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Sociology, Bachelor of Arts & Science

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Program Overview

The Sociology BA/BS program prepares students to develop critical and analytical skills to examine human society, emphasizing how culture and social structure combine to shape people’s attitudes, beliefs, and values. 

The sociology program helps students better understand social inequalities and their implications for social justice. Students will not only learn to understand social issues and social organization but also to resolve social problems and improve social conditions for communities. Students will develop the tools and skills to be able to take an active role in creating, managing, and growing groups and organizations.

Sociology graduates will have the skills to conduct research, analyze information and think critically about relationship building and community interactions.

The sociology program prepares students for various career paths such as education, research, government, business, human services, community organizing, program development, policy analysis, youth services, criminal justice, crime and violence prevention, and victim services.

Program Admission

"As a senior in the Sociology program, I have developed the ability to see the world in a different way. I have learned the importance of how society is working toward reconciling inequalities between races, social classes, and gender. By the way, I was 57 years old when I began college. I'll be 62 when I graduate. If I can do it, you can too!"

- Catherine Allen, Current Sociology Student

Faculty Support Student Success

Faculty advisors and mentors work closely with our majors to develop programs of study based on their interests and career goals. Sociology students can earn up to 9 credits of upper-division coursework in the major doing field experience work in a wide variety of internship placements.

Advanced students may choose to conduct their own research projects with the supervision and guidance of faculty for course credit. There are also opportunities for students to conduct independent studies for credit with the sponsorship of one of our faculty members.

Five reasons to study Sociology

  1. You will master a range of transferable skills opening doors to a wide range of career options.
  2. You will gain an understanding of different points of view from the diverse students in our program preparing you to succeed in an increasingly diverse and complex world.
  3. The varied topics of study and breadth of the discipline foster versatility and adaptability, complementing other degree programs. Many sociology majors opt to complete a second major in criminology or psychology.
  4. Our students want to make a difference in their community and in the world and the knowledge and skills you take away from the program prepare you to be a positive change agent.
  5. Relevant and dynamic as a field of study, sociologists engage the issues that impact our daily lives and examine how the rapidly changing social environment will shape our future.

The intellectual power of sociological thought and practice is in making us see the world in a new light thereby allowing us to gain insight into how our own lives are influenced by our social relationships and the social structures we create.

Frequently Asked Questions

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    WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF A DEGREE IN SOCIOLOGY?

    A degree in sociology enhances personal life satisfaction, responsible citizenship, and vocational opportunities. First, a degree in sociology provides unique, multifaceted, and more interesting ways of seeing the social world. Sociology graduates view social behavior and relations in ways others do not. They interpret differently what they read in newspapers, magazines, and books and what they see happening on television, at the movies, on the street, and in the home. Thinking and reflecting sociologically enriches a person’s experience over a lifetime as they see the extraordinary in the ordinary, the exceptional in the common, the exotic in the humdrum.

    Second, sociology graduates have a better understanding of the ways in which culture and social structure produce social and economic inequalities in organizational and institutional contexts. Such awareness can increase tolerance and guide informed civic involvement in such areas as voting, running for office, jury duty, volunteer work, and community service. Thoughtful reflection guiding constructive engagement not only contributes to community development but holds the potential to improve social and economic conditions for all members of society.

    Finally, studying for a sociology degree provides important knowledge and skills sought after by employers- creative and critical thinking, effective oral and written communication, research design and analysis, problem solving and strategic planning, and cooperative teaming. Sociology graduates’ knowledge of the structure and culture of specific organizations (hospitals, corporations, universities, police departments, courts) and institutions (family, education, economic, political) make them capable of effectively negotiating these environments and taking on leadership positions.

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    WHAT KINDS OF JOBS ARE AVAILABLE TO SOCIOLOGY GRADUATES?

    The sociology major prepares students to work in a wide variety of vocations including education, industry, government, business, and social service agencies. Many sociology graduates secure employment in youth services, drug rehabilitation, law enforcement, corrections, probation/parole, case management, and victim services. 

    Students should keep in mind, however, that many employers are looking more for employees with a broad range of knowledge and a generalized set of proficiencies than they are for employees with a very focused and highly specific set of skills. Recognizing that labor force requirements change rapidly, many government departments, private organizations, small businesses, and corporations seek new employees who are open to novel ideas, adaptable to new situations, highly trainable, well organized, team players, committed to the task at hand, and effective at getting the job done. Such employers will assume that a graduate with a B.A. or a B.S., and an overall average approximating a 4.0 (A), will possess these qualities, regardless of their major. 

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    WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE B.A. AND B.S. DEGREES IN SOCIOLOGY?

    The sociology requirements for the B.A. and the B.S. are identical. The difference lies in the fact that the B.A. requires foreign language certification while the B.S. does not.

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    HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE TO FINISH A SOCIOLOGY DEGREE?

    A sociology degree is designed to be completed in four years. The degree requires the accumulation of 120 credit hours. For students completing in four years, the schedule usually involves 30 credit hours per academic year or 15 hours per semester. Some students finish more quickly by taking additional courses in the summer. Others with demanding work or family commitments may take longer to finish.

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    HOW EASY IS IT FOR STUDENTS WHO WORK FULL TIME TO COMPLETE A DEGREE?

    While students who are working a 40 hour (or more) week face may face challenges in completing a degree in a timely fashion, the sociology program offers classes in a number of formats that provide choice and flexibility for working students. The department offers online and hybrid classes and some evening classes, both on the Pueblo Campus and in Colorado Springs. Distance education classes offered through the Division of Extended Studies enable students to build a flexible schedule year-round or earn an external degree if majoring in Sociology or Criminology.

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    WITH WHOM DO I CONSULT FOR ACADEMIC ADVISING?

    Any member of the sociology department is ready, willing, and able to advise sociology majors or minors. Consult the Faculty section of the website for department members’ phone numbers and email addresses.

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    What Additional Educational Opportunities Might I Pursue After Completing a Bachelor’s Degree in Sociology?

    Some sociology graduates continue to study sociology in advanced degree programs (MA, MS, Ph.D.). Employment for those with graduate degrees often involves research jobs in public or private agencies or teaching positions in colleges or universities. Employment opportunities for sociologists with advanced degrees also include executive positions with community non-profits or government agencies. Some sociology graduates pursue professional degrees in other areas such as law (JD), public administration (MPA), criminal justice, counseling, religious studies, disability studies, women & gender studies, social work (MSW), or business (MBA).

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    WHO CAN I TALK TO ABOUT MY FINANCIAL AID OR BILL?

    It is important to check your PAWS account regularly. Student Financial Services is open Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and is available via phone at 719.549.2753, email at financialaid@csupueblo.edu, and take walk-ins.

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    AM I QUALIFIED FOR SCHOLARSHIPS?

    You may be qualified for one or more scholarships offered by CSU Pueblo. You must have an updated FAFSA on file with Student Financial Services. Visit the Scholarships page for more information.

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Summer is Here.

Earn a $500 scholarship by enrolling in nine summer credits. Summer semester is a unique opportunity for our students and the perfect time to make progress in your degree.

Department of Sociology, Criminology, & Anthropology

Faculty and Staff

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