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American Sign Language

The American Sign Language Program at CSU Pueblo follows a proficiency-oriented philosophy that seeks to develop students’ ability in signing while also increasing their understanding of Deaf culture. 

Students can enroll in beginning ASL (ASL 101, ASL 102) and intermediate ASL (ASL 201, ASL 202). Each of these courses focuses on Deaf culture, Deaf history, ASL vocabulary/ grammar rules, and ASL structure. 

Every ASL course tries to create an immersive experience with a strong focus on building students’ signing abilities through practice inside and outside of class. Furthermore, students get to explore Deaf culture and community through special guests and community involvement. 

Why study ASL?

Having ASL as a second language can increase one's marketability. Many careers can be enhanced by the study of ASL as a second language. ASL is the third most used language in the U.S.A. 

Many people become sign language interpreters. There are many specialties to this profession, medical interpreting, legal interpreting, mental health interpreting, video relay interpreting, educational interpreting, and technological interpreting to name a few disciplines. Some ASL interpreters go on to work with the Dept. of Defense, the FBI, and the CIA as there are Deaf people employed in these agencies.​

Careers in each field of study can offer full time, gainful employment and bring competitive salaries in today's market. Many people choose to be freelance interpreters and decide their own hours of work availability. The possibilities are endless.​

The following classes can count towards General Education Requirement as well as a Humanities and Cross-Cultural Requirement

Requirements

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    ASL 101 Beginning American Sign Language I (3 credits)

    Development of skills for communicative interaction with and among the deaf by means of hand symbolization and cultural understanding. 
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    ASL 102 Beginning American Sign Language II (3 credits)

    Continuation of the development of skills for communicative interaction with and among the deaf by means of hand symbolization and cultural understanding. Prerequisite: ASL 101 or permission of instructor. 
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    ASL 201 Intermediate American Sign Language I (3 credits)

    Development of intermediate skills for communicative interaction with and among the deaf by means of hand symbolization and cultural understanding. Prerequisite: ASL 102.  
  •  

    ASL 202 Intermediate American Sign Language II (3 credits)

    Development of intermediate to advanced skills for communicative interaction with and among the deaf by means of hand symbolization and cultural understanding. Prerequisite: ASL 102.  

Resources and Activities for Students of ASL

Language Center

(PSYCH 147) This facility offers wonderful resources, services and activities.  You can find computers, books, DVDs and games. There are also tutoring and conversation partners waiting to help students exercise their language skills. Activities include movie nights, language circles, club gatherings, festivals, and game nights. It is the perfect place to exercise your language skills in a social environment. Daily hours of operation are Monday through Friday 9:00-5:00. Contact the Supervisor of the Language Center (Shureka Nyawalo) for additional information.

World Languages Department

Faculty and Staff

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