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  • COVID-19 Update: Campus open to public Monday through Friday, 9AM-12PM and 2PM-5PM.

     

    As of July 6, campus services are available in person and in remote format. Visitors must follow the signs to health screening upon arrival.

Community Announcements

Colorado Governor Jared Polis

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    07/14: Update on State Response to COVID-19 Pandemic

    DENVER - Governor Jared Polis provided an update today to Coloradans on the state’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

    “Now is not the time to let our guard down and this pandemic is far from over. We have to do a better job of wearing masks, social distancing and washing our hands,” said Governor Jared Polis. “Colorado is seeing a slow, but steady rise in cases and hospitalizations. We are not seeing the same scenarios in other states like Texas and Florida, but here in Colorado we are only as good as our ability to take the necessary measures to protect ourselves and others. Drastic changes can occur in only a matter of weeks, which is why we need to remain vigilant. Masks continue to be our ticket to more economic growth and freedom.”

    The Governor pointed out that Colorado’s small businesses are performing slightly better than national averages on key metrics, including:

    • Making payments like rent, payroll, utilities, and loans
    • Number of employee hours worked
    • Number of employees retained

    Colorado’s unemployment rate, while still unacceptably high, remains three points lower than the national average. Governor Polis highlighted the Paycheck Protection Program and the $129 billion available for small businesses that need aid. Businesses can apply until August 8, and can visit choosecolorado.com for more details.

    The Governor also highlighted all the work done by the General Assembly during the 2020 legislative session, much of the legislation focusing on supporting Coloradans during the COVID-19 pandemic. These bills included direct housing assistance, help with utility bills, loans and grants for small businesses, assistance for those struggling with behavioral health issues and domestic violence, paid sick leave, and more.

    In addition, the Governor highlighted legislation extending and funding the reinsurance program for five more years to save people money on health care, legislation to refer a tobacco and vaping tax to the ballot to help schools during this challenging time, and provide free preschool to every child who wants it in Colorado, legislation to preserve and protect the air we breathe, and the bipartisan legislation to reform policing in Colorado communities. The Governor thanked the legislature’s Joint Budget Committee who had the difficult task of balancing one of the most challenging budgets in state history.

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    07/12: Issues Executive Orders in Response to COVID-19 Pandemic

    DENVER - Governor Jared Polis extended and amended Executive Orders in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Gov. Polis extended an Executive Order to expedite the processing of unemployment insurance claims for Coloradans and will help protect the economic well-being of Colorado’s communities impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

    The Governor extended an Executive Order to ensure that hospitals and other inpatient treatment facilities have sufficient healthcare resources and personnel to treat patients suffering from COVID-19. The Governor extended an Executive Order to maintain eligibility for Coloradans enrolled in Medicaid and the Children’s Basic Health Plan. 

    The Governor extended an Executive Order to provide relief to public utility customers to mitigate, respond to, and recover from the current economic disruption due to the presence of COVID-19 in the State. The Governor extended and amended an Executive Order ordering State agencies to help prevent evictions of tenants economically harmed by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

    The Governor extended an Executive Order to provide boards of county commissioners with broader discretion and greater flexibility to implement restrictions on open burning

    Gov. Polis amended and extended an Executive Order in light of the Colorado Supreme Court’s decision in Ritchie v. Polis. Gov. Polis extended and amended an Executive Order limiting in-person contact for the Secretary of State’s operations. The Governor extended an Executive Order concerning signature collection for Unaffiliated and Independent Candidates and authorizing the Secretary of State to create temporary rules for registered electors to receive and return candidate petitions over mail and email due to the presence of COVID-19.

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    07/09: Update on State Response to COVID-19 Pandemic

    DENVER - Governor Jared Polis was joined by Dr. Jonathan Samet, Dean of the Colorado School of Public Health to provide an update on the state’s response to COVID-19 and unveiled an interactive Colorado COVID model from the Colorado School of Public Health. This is a new tool that can help individuals, businesses, local public health agencies and local governments, visualize their own role in stopping the spread of COVID and preventing a public health emergency.

    “This exciting new tool at ColoradoCoronavirusmodel.com shows just how important our actions are in keeping our economy moving in the right direction and preventing a surge in cases. We are committed to using data and the latest information when making decisions, and this tool gives a glimpse into the type of data we are looking at,” said Governor Jared Polis. “It’s up to each of us to do a bit better than we have been at wearing masks, following social distancing protocols, and washing our hands. And not party. If we let up, even for a moment, then Colorado will begin to see more and more cases like our neighboring states. Wear a damn mask.”

    This application displays the predictive model of the COVID-19 epidemic in Colorado. Coloradans can use the model to see how different factors, like wearing a mask, can change the spread of COVID-19 in Colorado in the future. The factors can be adjusted to see how different scenarios play out. 

    For example, the following can be changed in the tool:

    • The current level of social distancing for the general population
    • The levels of social distancing for the general population starting in mid-August, about when many kids are going back to school
    • The level of social distancing for people over 65, who may be at a higher risk of a severe outcome if they contract covid
    • The portion of the population wearing masks
    • The number of contacts traced for every case
    • And how quickly those contacts are traced

    Visit http://coloradocoronavirusmodel.com/ 

    Gov. Polis today signed the Protect Our Neighbors Executive Order which directs CDPHE to create a certification process to allow local communities to move from Safer at Home in the Vast, Great Outdoors to Protect Our Neighbors. CDPHE will also issue a corresponding Public Health Order. To qualify for Protect Our Neighbors, a county or a region must: 

    • Certify that they meet qualification metrics established by CDPHE; and
    • Submit a mitigation and containment plan on what the county or region will do if they fall out of compliance with one or more of these metrics, and documentation of support for the plan by local officials, law enforcement, and any others identified by CDPHE. 

    Governor Polis highlighted a study that shows nationwide, universal mask-wearing would save five percent of the national GDP, which is about a trillion dollars of economic activity. The Governor fully supports the local mask ordinances, and applauded community leaders that have helped pass them.

    Gov. Polis also announced that the federal government has extended the application period for the Paycheck Protection Program until August 8. There is $129 billion remaining in the fund which can be used as forgivable loans for small businesses that need aid. Visit choosecolorado.com  for more information.

    In May, the Office of eHealth Innovation and the eHealth Commission secured $2 million in funding for telemedicine projects in partnership with Health Care Policy and Financing from the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid. Gov. Polis today announced the awardees for the first cohort of telemedicine projects. 

    The Office of eHealth and the eHealth Commission will distribute $394,844 to the following organizations for their innovative efforts:

    • Axis Health System in Southwest Colorado
    • Beverly Hawp & Associates in Colorado Springs
    • Clinica Family Health in the North Denver Metro Area
    • Colorado Coalition for the Homeless based in Denver
    • Developmental Disabilities Resource Center based in Lakewood, and 
    • Mental Health Center of Denver. 

    These projects were selected because they will better prepare the state for the next phase of COVID-19, provide insight for key partners such as the Department of Health Care Policy and Financing, and help solidify the new normal of expanded access to virtual care. 

    Gov. Polis signed Executive Order D 2020 126, extending the temporary suspension of certain regulatory statutes concerning juvenile justice, regional centers, and behavioral health due to the presence of COVID-19.

    View the Governor’s news conference and the Governor’s presentation.

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    07/02: Polis Urges Coloradans to Safely & Responsibly Celebrate 4th of July

    DENVER - Governor Jared Polis urged Coloradans to be safe, to wear masks, follow social distancing requirements, and to wash their hands this July 4th holiday weekend.

    “Whether Coloradans are enjoying our great outdoors or having a cookout, people should celebrate this 4th of July by staying on the trail that leads to suppressing the virus and rebuilding our economy. That means wearing masks, practicing social distancing and good hygiene, and avoiding risky activities,” said Gov. Polis. “This Independence Day is a time to celebrate our freedom that so many fought to gain, but with freedom comes responsibility, so please exercise personal responsibility, use common sense, and err on the side of caution.”

    Here are a few guidelines that Coloradans should follow:

    • Make It Safer: If you choose to participate in in-person activities, keep it small, keep your distance from others, wash your hands frequently, and wear a mask. Consider a smaller gathering than in years past, and try to stay outside where transmission of coronavirus is less likely. Don’t be afraid to change your plans if you feel uncomfortable about the risk.
    • Know Before You Go: Check fire bans and local COVID-19-related rules at your destination. If you plan to play in the great outdoors, be prepared with appropriate supplies. Just because we’re in the middle of a pandemic doesn’t mean we can ignore other safety rules that are meant to keep us all healthy and safe.
    • Prevent Fires:  It’s fire season, and this year we need to be even more careful due to added threats due to COVID-19. We want to prevent situations where people have to evacuate their homes, firefighters have to deploy to camps, and the resulting smoke worsens summer air quality, which would be very bad in the middle of a pandemic where the disease attacks your respiratory system. So please skip the fireworks and campfires this year.
    • How families can safely have holiday cookouts and gatherings : Summer gatherings this holiday should look different compared to a typical summer. It’s important to keep your distance and keep gatherings small. We’re asking you to continue to have less interactions with less people and do so in a safe way by wearing a face covering, remaining 6ft away from others, and washing your hands frequently. Additionally, being in an outdoor environment is ideal - we have the benefit of climate and sunshine to modify/decrease transmission.

    Learn more about the risks and benefits of everyday activities 

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    06/30: Extends Safer at Home and Updates Protect Our Neighbor Framework

    DENVER - Governor Jared Polis today extended the Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors Executive Order, and provided an update on Colorado’s next steps during the COVID-19 pandemic, introducing more details on the Protect Our Neighbors framework. The Governor was joined by Jill Hunsaker Ryan, the Executive Director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment; Dr. Rachel Herlihy, the state’s top epidemiologist; Joni Reynolds, the Gunnison County Public Health Director; and Jason Vahling, the City and County of Broomfield Public Health Director.

    “Protect Our Neighbors will allow Colorado to respond more swiftly and effectively at the community level in the event of another surge of cases. We live in a diverse state with cities, booming suburbs, small resort towns, and rural areas with plenty of wide-open spaces. Each community is having their own unique experience with this virus. Going forward, we want to increase our ability to tackle outbreaks at a community level and only issue statewide orders when absolutely necessary,” said Gov. Polis. “We are making some much-needed investments in our local public health agencies, so they can contain and quell an outbreak before it gets out of control. The fate of Colorado in both virus suppression and economic recovery is largely in the hands of Coloradans. If we continue taking the critical steps of staying at home, wearing masks when leaving the house and following social distancing practices, then we will get through this together.”

    The Governor did not announce any additional relaxing of restrictions today, but described the new phase: Protect Our Neighbors that will give local communities more freedom to provide economic opportunity while ensuring that they have the necessary public health capacity. The introduction of the new phase means that different parts of the state could be at different phases of reopening, based on local conditions and capabilities. 

    “Each day, we make progress to build the capacity of our public health system -- from ramping up statewide testing sites to onboarding new case investigators and contact tracers systemwide, to identifying creative ways to aggressively acquire PPE. I am proud of the team at CDPHE who have stood strong during this very difficult time, and I’m grateful for our local public health partners who are leading the response against COVID in their communities,” said Jill Hunsaker Ryan, executive director of the Colorado Dept. of Public Health and Environment. “It is important that Coloradans don’t let up now, and this new phase - Protect Our Neighbors - isn’t just words. It means we all accept personal responsibility for the things we can do every day to keep ourselves and others healthy.” 

    Moving forward, communities that can demonstrate strong public health and health care systems, paired with low virus levels, can take on more control over their reopening plans. In order to reopen to this greater extent, communities must have: 

    • Low virus prevalence; 
    • Health care capacity to handle a surge; and  
    • Strong public health capacity to contain outbreaks and surges locally, including the ability to test, track, and trace.

    In order to qualify for Protect Our Neighbors, a county (or region) must do two things:

    • Certify qualification according to the scientific metrics; and
    • Submit a mitigation and containment plan on what the county or region will do if they fall out of compliance with any of the metrics. This containment plan must be accompanied by letters of support from local elected leaders including county commissioners and mayors, the hospitals that serve that community, law enforcement, county emergency management, local public health, and if applicable, tribes.

    The certification process will begin next week. To learn more about how a community can qualify, click here

    Communities in Protect Our Neighbors will be able to permit all activities to occur at 50 percent of pre-pandemic capacity, with at least six feet between non-household members and no more than 500 people in one setting at a time. Local communities may issue more detailed guidelines or public health orders for different settings, so long as the capacity does not exceed these caps. 

    The Governor also discussed funding and support for local governments as Colorado looks to move into Protect Our Neighbors. In total, the state is investing $346 million in state and local capacity, with $75 million going directly from the state to Local Public Health Agencies. Gov. Polis also announced two new sources of available funding: a Planning Grant or Infrastructure Strengthening Grant. 

    All counties or local public health agencies can apply for a Planning Grant of up to $50,000. If counties have already identified infrastructure needs, they may apply for Infrastructure Strengthening Grants, with a maximum state award of $150,000 and a maximum total grant of $300,000. These grants will require local matching funds and can be spent on investments such as technology, community resource coordination, communication activities to increase compliance with the public health orders, funding for community-based partners and cultural brokers, and enhanced prevention and containment efforts.

    Governor Polis announced the closure of bars. Bars that have taken steps to open as restaurants may continue to operate in-person service, so long as they have patrons seated with their own party only in set seating, spaced six feet apart, and with no mingling. Bars are permitted to sell alcoholic beverages to-go for takeout or delivery consumption if the alcoholic beverages are sold with food. All of the guidelines previously in place around social distancing still apply. Bars may still operate if open under a county variance pursuant to the terms of that county variance. More information can be found in the Governor’s Executive Order.

    View the Governor’s presentation. Watch the full news conference on the Governor’s Facebook page.

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    06/27: Takes Action in Response to COVID-19

    DENVER - Governor Jared Polis signed Executive Orders today in response to the COVID-19 global pandemic. 

    The Governor signed an Executive Order directing the Colorado Department of Human Services to access federal funds for child care services during the COVID-19 pandemic to ensure stability and consistency for child care providers and protect the vital role they play for children and families.

    Gov. Polis signed an Executive Order extending the use of telehealth services due to the COVID-19 pandemic.  The Governor extended an Executive Order concerning the temporary suspension of certain requirements preventing the issuance of marriage licenses, and extended an Executive Order concerning the suspension of certain regulatory statutes

    The Governor extended an Executive Order ordering the temporary suspension of certain regulatory statutes concerning petition gathering for Unaffiliated and Independent candidates for office. 

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    06/24: Update on State Response to COVID-19

    DENVER - Gov. Polis today provided an update on the state’s response to COVID-19 and was joined by State Epidemiologist Dr. Rachel Herlihy to remind Coloradans about the importance of social distancing and wearing masks, especially with the upcoming 4th of July holiday. 

    “It remains critical that Coloradans continue taking steps to protect themselves and others. Our state’s success thus far has been due to the actions and personal responsibility of Coloradans, and that will continue to be true,” said Governor Jared Polis. “As long as we continue to wear masks and follow social distancing guidelines, we can avoid seeing cases climb like our neighboring states. As we continue to reopen, more of the responsibility is placed on the individual to do the right thing. I’m proud of how Coloradans have responded during this pandemic and believe we can continue to make the right choices moving forward.  As we plan to celebrate our nation’s birthday on July 4th and enjoy their summer, Coloradans should make plans in a safe way, with just their own family or one other family.”

    The Governor discussed the risk levels associated with different activities. He encouraged Coloradans to get out into the state’s great outdoors and participate in low-risk activities like camping, hiking, biking, outdoor exercise and activities.

    When deciding which activities they are comfortable participating in, Coloradans should ask themselves the following questions:

    • How many other people will be participating in this activity?
    • Is the activity outside?
    • Can I put distance between myself and others?
    • How long will the activity take?
    • Do I feel 100% healthy?
    • How will I get there? Biking, walking, and driving in a car are all safer than public transportation.
    • Do I live with someone who is more vulnerable to COVID-19, and would be at high risk if I happened to bring the virus home?
    • What is the value of this activity to me versus the risk I am taking?

    Coloradans can visit www.covid19.colorado.gov/risks-benefits to assess the risk level of certain activities.

    As Coloradans are spending more time outdoors, the state is reminding everyone to be responsible in Colorado’s natural spaces. Gov. Polis highlighted an initiative from the Colorado Tourism Office (CTO) encouraging visitors to show care, not only for destinations but also for the people who call them home. With lines like “How about a ski between you and me?” and “Keep a mask in your pocket, in case you need to rock it,” the CTO is creating a fun and memorable way to remember these important steps. Learn more

    Gov. Polis also highlighted a best practice being used by Eagle County and encouraged other counties to do the same. Eagle County has asked every hotel and short-term rental to give a letter to guests upon booking providing critical public health information. The letter asks all travelers to follow the “5 Commitments of Containment” while visiting Eagle County, which are:

    • I will maintain 6 feet of physical distance.
    • I will wash my hands often.
    • I will cover my face in public.
    • I will stay home when I am sick.
    • I will get tested immediately if I have symptoms.

    Governor Polis today released guidance to allow outdoor visitation at residential care facilities in order to minimize the potential spread of COVID-19. Some of the most important standards:

    • The facility cannot have outdoor visitation if the facility had any recent positive cases or outbreaks and has not completed the required isolation period of 14 days. Facilities with active cases are not allowed to offer visits. 
    • All visits must be scheduled. Prior to the visits, facilities must provide information about COVID-19, and instructions for self-screening on the day of the visit, social distancing and mask-wearing, and details about the visit.
    • The visitor must be greeted outside at a designated area by facility staff, and the staff member will perform temperature check and symptom screening in accordance with current CDC guidelines. 
    • All visitors must wear a face mask or cloth face covering. All staff and the resident must wear a surgical or cloth mask unless doing so would inhibit the resident’s health.  

    View the full guidance here

    The Governor also signed Executive Order D 2020 113, allowing voluntary or elective surgeries and procedures to proceed under certain conditions.

    The full news conference can be viewed on the Governor’s Facebook page.

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    06/20: Takes Action in Response to COVID-19

    DENVER - Gov. Polis signed Executive Orders in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    “Coloradans have done a great job wearing masks when leaving the house, staying physically distant from others, and washing our hands but we are only a few short steps ahead of the virus and we need to do better. The data is now starting to show a reversal of some of our gains, the 3-day moving average for cases is now going up in our state,” said Governor Polis. “This emergency extension helps Colorado further support our response efforts and remain prepared in the face of this global pandemic. I encourage all Coloradans to stay vigilant and we will get through this together.” 

    Gov. Polis signed Executive Order D 2020 109, extending the state of disaster emergency and providing additional funds for response activities due to the presence of coronavirus. 

    “Workers in stores and public-facing businesses have been wearing facial masks, and more and more companies are now thankfully requiring that customers wear masks to keep one another safe. Costco, Pizzeria Locale, and more and more Colorado businesses now require customers to wear masks. Today we are further protecting our state and county workers from infection by adding this best practice to the way we as a state do business,” said Governor Polis. “While we are doing our best to help people access public services virtually from the safety of your home, customers needing in-person services at our state and county government facilities will now also be safer by ensuring that those around them wear facial masks and I continue to encourage other businesses to make the right decision to protect their employees and customers by putting in place and enforcing mask requirements.”

    “I direct the Executive Director of CDPHE to issue a public health order requiring that employees, contractors, and others providing services for Mass Transportation Operations and Critical Businesses where employees, contractors, or others who interact in close proximity with other employees or with the public must: 1. Wear medical or non-medical cloth face coverings that cover the nose and mouth while working, except where doing so would inhibit that individual’s health,” the Executive Order reads. 

    Gov. Polis also signed Executive Order D 2020 108, to increase the Medicaid home health workforce and eliminate cost-sharing for coronavirus testing and treatment for Medicaid enrollees. “This Executive Order extends Executive Order D 2020 077, which suspends certain statutes to preserve the State’s Medicaid home health workforce and protect Medicaid enrollees from COVID-19 by reducing the need for in-person visits. I also temporarily suspend statutory requirements for cost-sharing for COVID-19 testing and treatment for Medicaid enrollees,” the Executive Order reads. 

    Governor Polis also extended Executive Order D 2020 112, concerning criminal justice as well as Executive Order D 2020 111, issuing emergency rules extending the expiration date of licenses and other documents. 

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    06/11: Importance of Wearing Masks

    DENVER – Governor Jared Polis today provided an update on the state’s response to COVID-19, where he emphasized reasons why Coloradans should continue wearing masks and also announced the Can Do Colorado Community Challenge. 

    “In order for Coloradans to enjoy more of the Colorado we all love, we have to continue wearing masks whenever we leave the house. When we pair social distancing with wide-spread mask-wearing, we put ourselves in a position for success,” said Governor Polis. “This isn’t just about protecting ourselves, it’s about protecting those around us and containing the virus in our communities. I’m proud of the way many businesses are stepping up and getting creative in serving their customers in as safe a manner as possible, it’s a great example of the Colorado spirit. We need more of that innovation and are encouraging more businesses to look at how they can operate in a way that prioritizes the safety of staff and customers.”

    Gov. Polis today announced the Can Do Colorado Community Challenge, an extension of Can Do Colorado which spotlights and supports innovative businesses that are finding creative ways to continue serving their customers safely, implementing teleworking, and reducing in-person interactions during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Can Do Colorado Community Challenge calls on local governments and businesses to continue finding safe and sustainable opportunities to jumpstart the local economy and implement these practices until a cure or vaccine is created. The state wants to continue to champion things like teleworking whenever possible; equity for essential workers; and helping communities provide safe spaces for all to walk, bike, dine, and conduct business.

    Various departments and organizations throughout state government are offering a wide array of resources, including grant funding and expert technical assistance to help reopen the economy safely while making progress towards important health goals. 

    Partnering departments and organizations include the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment, the Colorado Department of Local Affairs, the Colorado Department of Regulatory Affairs, the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment, the Colorado Department of Transportation, the Colorado Energy Office, the Governor’s Office of Economic Development and International Trade, the Regional Air Quality Council, and the Denver Regional Council of Governments. To learn more about the Challenge and how each agency is supporting, read the fact sheet

    The State of Colorado wants to hear first-hand stories about how the behavioral health system is impacting young Coloradans. Coloradans ages 12-26, will have the chance to fill out a survey detailing their mental health experiences. The survey will close on June 22. Given the well-documented uptick in mental and behavioral health issues among young people, it’s more critical than ever to have folks share their stories. In 2019, Gov. Polis directed the Colorado Department of Human Services to spearhead Colorado’s Behavioral Health Task Force to improve Colorado's behavioral health system. Fill out the survey here or at www.coloradoyouthsurvey.com.    

    Gov. Polis also reminded Coloradans to fill out their Census form, whether it’s the one that came through the mail or filled out online. The Census is critical to getting an accurate count of how many people live in the U.S., for determining Colorado’s representation in Congress, and funding from the federal government that every Coloradan benefits from.

    Governor Polis highlighted the story of an employee at the Colorado Department of Transportation who contracted COVID-19 and spent 34 harrowing days in the hospital before being able to return home. Mike Clark was in a coma for two weeks, and after waking up he needed physical therapy to swallow and walk again. Mike said, “If there is anything that should prompt you to wear a mask at work, it is the thought of lying in bed, in a hospital, atop a bed pan.” The Governor reiterated Mike’s message reminding all Coloradans to take the simple steps of wearing masks and following social distancing requirements to keep themselves and their loved ones safe. 

    View the Governor’s news conference.

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    06/04: Federal Governor’s Emergency Education Relief Funds

    DENVER - Governor Polis today announced $44 million in Governor’s Emergency Education Relief (GEER) funding for school districts, schools, and institutions of higher education, and other education-related entities to address the impact of COVID-19. The majority of these funds will be utilized for grants to school districts, public schools, and public institutions of higher education serving high-needs students in order to help prevent and address the “COVID slide” and support innovation and equity. In addition, the state will provide significant funding to increase capacity for Colorado Empowered Learning, the state-supported supplemental online program, in order to help school districts and schools access virtual content and professional development for educators in blended instructional models. 

    “The COVID-19 pandemic has created significant challenges across our state, but it has also created new opportunities to support innovation, increase equity, and improve our ability to offer high-quality blended instructional models across our state,” said Governor Jared Polis. “We are grateful to our federal partners for providing flexible funding that we can utilize to support Colorado students from preschool to higher education, increase capacity in rural areas, and invest in innovative approaches to improving student learning that can be replicated and scaled for years to come.” 

    The State of Colorado will also provide funding to ensure all Colorado students with financial need receive direct assistance and to support educator recruitment and retention in high-needs areas. In the coming weeks, the State will release more information about how to secure funding. 

    More information about the State of Colorado’s plans for GEER funding can be found below: 

    Over $33 million in grants to school districts, public schools, public institutions of higher education, and other education-related entities to support equity and innovation to address the COVID-19 crisis. The COVID-19 crisis has exacerbated existing achievement gaps for students who already face challenges, including low-income students, minority students, English-language learners, students with disabilities, and students experiencing homelessness or in foster care. With the majority of the GEER funding, the State will accept applications for a P-20 innovation fund to address the learning challenges related to the economic, social, and health impacts of COVID-19 in a manner that creates lasting innovations and improved student learning across both pre-K-12 and higher education. These grants will focus on student-centered learning, rethinking the student experience, strengthening and formalizing linkages between higher education, pK-12, and industry, and catalyzing innovations that can drive long-term impact and be sustainable after the life of the grant. The State of Colorado is pursuing research funding that will allow projects to be evaluated and to inform future efforts to address learning gaps for high-needs students. Priority will be given to proposals that serve children and families who have been disproportionately impacted from the health or economic effects of the virus, or rural areas, or to serve schools or school districts in priority improvement or turnaround. You can find more information about this fund here.  

    $5-6 million for dramatically increasing capacity for Colorado Empowered Learning. Governor Polis plans to work closely with the Colorado Department of Education to dramatically increase capacity for Colorado Empowered Learning, our state-supported supplemental online program that provides Colorado school districts, BOCES, and charter schools with access to fully-designed online courses, LMS platform options, professional development, and technical assistance for implementing blended and online learning models. These funds will allow school districts, BOCES, and charter schools greater access to this already developed and adaptive virtual content at low or no cost, and will help to build the capacity of our teachers by expanding access to professional development and coaching, whether in person or virtual, in blended instructional models.  

    $1 million for ensuring that all Colorado students with financial need receive direct support from institutions of higher education. Earlier this month, the U.S. Department of Education (ED) provided $144 million to Colorado’s public institutions of higher education, 50 percent of which needed to be utilized to provide direct support to students. However, some resident students with financial need were excluded from such aid. The Governor’s office plans to utilize a portion of GEER funds to help ensure all qualified students with financial need receive the support they need to weather this crisis.

    $3 million for investing in educator recruitment and retention to provide stability for school districts. The Quality Teacher Recruitment program provides support to organizations to recruit, select, train, and retain highly qualified teachers in areas that have had historic difficulty in attracting and keeping quality teachers. This program is even more important in an economic downturn, when school districts need support and stability in this area. Ensuring two years of funding for this program will help to support school districts that face significant challenges in the face of even further challenges with educator recruitment and retention this year.

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    06/04: Launches Campaign Encouraging Coloradans to Wear Masks

    DENVER - Governor Jared Polis today launched a new campaign, “Our Masks are Our Passport to the Colorado We Love,” including a public service announcement, encouraging Coloradans to wear masks as much as possible when they leave the house. 

    The Governor today delayed the start of the news conference to accommodate the timing of George Floyd’s memorial service. Gov. Polis praised the demonstrators who have continued making their voices heard and remarked on the wise words of Gianna Floyd, George Floyd’s daughter.

    “A video of George Floyd’s six-year-old daughter Gianna, being carried on the shoulders of one of George’s closest friends went viral this week. Smiling, she declares: ‘Daddy changed the world.’ And he certainly did. One of the best things about being a parent is those moments when our children show us wisdom in an unexpected way. Let us allow Gianna Floyd’s youthful wisdom to guide us in our quest for justice and equality. Let us live up to an innocent child’s expectations of what this country is capable of, and let us deliver on her promise of a changed world,” the Governor said.

    “The modeling shows that if we want to avoid a catastrophic breach of our health care system, and if we want to re-open our economy to a greater degree, then masks are absolutely essential,” Governor Polis said. “Here in our great state, your mask is your passport to the Colorado we love, and will play an important part in keeping yourself and those around you safe. Studies show that men are particularly reluctant to wear a mask, because they think it makes them look weak or uncool. But real weakness is being too insecure to wear a mask and then spreading coronavirus to your family when you get back home. At the end of the day, wearing a mask allows us to enjoy more of the Colorado we love.”

    Watch the public service announcement

    The Governor thanked Healthier Colorado, who partnered with the state to make this campaign happen, and the Colorado Outdoor Advertising Association who will be donating billboards for the campaign. The City of Westminster, Leevers Supermarkets, the Early Bird Restaurant, Pancho Cabrera, Metalonge, and all the volunteers were critical in the creation of this public service announcement. 

    Gov. Polis also signed Executive Order D 2020 092, amending and extending prior Executive Orders concerning non-medical face coverings, to provide discretion to employers and operators of places of public accommodation to deny admittance or service and require the removal of any individual who fails to wear a medical or non-medical face covering. This Executive Order takes effect immediately. 

    Today, the state finalized guidance for places of worship, outdoor recreation and personal recreation. Drafts were released on Monday, June 1 and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment solicited input from stakeholders and industry before releasing final versions today. This guidance now allows horses of worship to allow up to 50% capacity, but no more than 50 people for in-person worship. This also allows for pools to open in a limited capacity. 

    The Governor also announced plans to bolster the state’s education system through the Governor’s Emergency Education Relief Fund or the GEER fund. This $44 million from the federal government is intended to provide broad flexibility for Governors to address the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on high-needs students from preschool through higher education. The majority of this funding will be utilized for a new P-20 Equity and Innovation Fund. School districts, charter schools, institutions of higher education, and tribes will be invited to apply alone, in consortia, or with a partner. These funds will be utilized to address the impact of COVID-19 slide by transforming schools, improving transitions between P-12 and higher education, and increasing student-centered learning. 

    Gov. Polis announced that the Behavioral Health Task Force will publish an interim report outlining short and long-term impacts on the behavioral health system, including access to and affordability of services. Members will also evaluate the behavioral health crisis response to COVID-19 and recommend improvements for future events.

    The task force is sponsored by Lieutenant Governor Dianne Primavera. Members of the task force include:

    • Yadira Caraveo, State House of Representatives
    • Cara Cheevers, Colorado Division of Insurance
    • Lila Cummings, Colorado Hospital Association
    • Curt Drennen, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Co-Chair
    • Daniel Darting, Signal Behavioral Health Network
    • Doyle Forrestel, Colorado Behavioral Healthcare Council
    • Camille Harding, Colorado Department of Human Services
    • Joy Hart, Colorado Department of Corrections
    • Brenda Heimbach, El Paso County Public Health Office
    • DeAnne House, Ute Mountain Ute
    • Cheri Jahn, Colorado Provider Association
    • Jan James, Larimer County Human Services 
    • Tracy Johnson, Colorado Department of Health Care Policy and Financing
    • Kim Nordstrom, Colorado Access
    • Carrie Paykoc, Office of eHealth Innovation
    • Rod Pelton, State House of Representatives
    • Susie Walton, Park County Human Services
    • Robert Werthwein, Colorado Department of Human Services, Co-Chair
    • Leon Wittner, Consumer - parent
    • Anthony Young, Association of Black Psychologists

    The Governor also announced the state is launching LIFELINE PASS, a project that will encourage nursing homes and senior care facilities to allow visitation from relatives who safely test negative for Coronavirus. As the state works on the guidelines over the next week or so, this new program will allow people who test negative for Coronavirus, and have no known exposure or symptoms, to visit their loved ones. A 48-hour pass after a negative test can reduce the risk of spreading coronavirus to those who are most vulnerable and help make sure that residents of those facilities can receive visits in a reasonably safe way.

    View the full news conference on the Governor’s Facebook page.

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    06/03: COVID Relief Fund

    DENVER - Gov. Polis and the COVID Relief Fund today announced the fourth round of grants. This round of funding provided a total of $2.97 million to 145 community-based organizations serving Coloradans who are being disproportionately affected by COVID-19. Funds were distributed for this round in the Impact and Recovery priority areas.

    “Though it may feel we are getting back to normal, it’s important to remember that we are far from it, and many Coloradans are still struggling,” said Governor Jared Polis. “I’m so proud of how Coloradans have stepped up to donate their time or money to help our communities. These important funds are going directly to organizations on the ground who are working to help those impacted by the virus. This is a difficult time for many people, but we have to remember that we will all get through this together.”

    Of the total applications that were approved, $1.28 million was awarded to 63 organizations in the Impact priority area and $1.69 million was awarded to 82 organizations for Recovery. The Fund’s review committees and Decision and Allocation Committee engaged in a coordinated review process to ensure alignment with the Fund’s eligibility criteria and were informed by community data and insights from across Colorado to ensure grant awards are in service to the most acute needs of communities.

    Through four rounds, 650 grants have been disbursed for a total of $14 million to organizations located in 58 counties and serving all 64 counties.

    View the list of grantees in the fourth round here. View the list of donors here

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    06/02: COVID-19 Response

    DENVER - Governor Jared Polis today provided an update on the state’s response to COVID-19 and discussed Safer at Home and In the Vast, Great Outdoors. The Governor also addressed the senseless murder of George Floyd and demonstrations in Denver and across the country. 

    “Our state has some of the most beautiful natural open spaces in the world and we want Coloradans to safely enjoy our vast, great outdoors. While we are all still safer at home, we are also able to practice better social distancing in our great outdoors than in confined indoor spaces,” said Gov. Polis.  

    “What happened to George Floyd was not only wrong, it was brutal. It was inhumane. It was murder,” Governor Polis continued. “But the reality is that this is much larger than the need to hold one officer and others accountable. It’s about a pattern of injustice and unfair treatment that Black Americans and communities of color have endured, not only in our criminal justice system, but in every area of American society. We need to listen to the voices of those who are crying out for reform, and we need to take action. To those peacefully protesting, I want you to know that I see you, I hear you and I grieve with you. And more importantly, I want to work with you. Spray paint can be power washed, and windows can be fixed, but the black lives taken can’t be replaced or brought back, and the pain and injustices that our black community members have suffered will take years and decades to repair. I am ready, willing, and eager to be your partner in that work.”

    The Governor provided an update on Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors, encouraging Coloradans to enjoy the state’s incredible outdoor spaces, where people are better able to follow social distancing requirements. The level of risk for outdoor activities is low enough that older Coloradans and those with underlying conditions are now able to go outside and participate in Colorado’s natural beauty. Everyone should continue wearing a mask and following social distancing requirements while outdoors. 

    The Governor also discussed the levels of risk Coloradans can be exposed to through various activities. Staying home is considered low risk, outdoor activities is considered a moderate risk, outdoor gatherings are a higher risk, and indoor gatherings are the highest risk. 

    The state is also opening up playgrounds and swimming pools at limited capacity, and has also released draft guidance on reopening houses of worship, certain forms of outdoor recreation and personal recreation, and updates to the child care and personal services guidances. The state is currently soliciting feedback, which can be submitted here. Final versions will be released on Thursday.

    Gov. Polis today announced that Colorado is now running 7,000 - 8,000 tests per day. The state now believes it is capturing 50% of symptomatic cases, up from 33% and growing. 

    In addition, Gov. Polis announced a new partnership with the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), who will mobilize more than 800 AmeriCorps and Senior Corps members to support the state’s COVID-19 response through contact tracing and other associated work.

    Contact tracing means following up with individuals who came into contact with an infected individual to ensure they get tested and quarantine themselves if necessary. 300 AmeriCorps NCCC members, based out of the Southwest Region Campus in Aurora, will start immediately. 350 VISTA Summer Associates will be hosted by the Community Resource Center in Denver and Conservation Legacy in Durango, both existing AmeriCorps VISTA projects, with 100-200 additional Senior Corps volunteers to join in Denver.

    With more than one thousand contact tracers working in Colorado, the state will be able to address outbreaks more quickly, which will reduce infections and save lives. 

    Organizations are currently recruiting for the new positions announced today, the first of which begin on June 22. Those who serve as VISTA Summer Associates will earn a stipend and an education award at the end of their service. For more information on requirements and details on how to apply visit www.colorado.gov/servecolorado

    View the full news conference.

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    05/25: Issues Guidance for Restaurants, Summer Camps and Private Camping

    DENVER - Gov, Jared Polis today announced updates to Safer at Home and changes to restaurants, summer camps and private camping. 

    “We are still a long way from returning to normal, but these updates are a step in the right direction because Coloradans are doing a good job so far limiting our social interactions. If we can continue staying at home as much as possible, wearing face coverings and washing our hands when leaving the house, then we will be able to slow the spread of the virus while reigniting our economy. If not, it will cost lives, and the economic pain will also be worse,” said Governor Jared Polis.

    “Coloradans value our diverse culinary scene and amazing restaurants, and I’m proud that our state is now providing science-based guidelines on how restaurants can open as safely as reasonably possible for their employees and customers. Diners will have more space between tables and at many restaurants, more opportunities to eat outside. The safest thing anyone can do is stay home whenever possible, but for those who want to shop and dine we want to make sure it can be done as safely as possible,” the Governor continued. 

    Governor Polis updated and extended the Safer at Home Executive Order. The executive order also directs CDPHE to develop and issue guidance related to restaurants and summer camps.

    Beginning on May 27, restaurants will be able to open for in-person dining at 50% capacity of the indoor posted occupancy code limit, but they can not exceed 50 people, whichever is less. They are also encouraged to provide as much outdoor services as possible. Bars will remain closed. Establishments that do not serve food will be evaluated in June. Read the full restaurant guidance here

    Children’s day camps and youth sports camps will open on Monday, June 1, 2020. Residential overnight camps will be closed in June. Decisions for July and August overnight camps will be made in mid-June. Children’s residential camps that choose to operate as day camps must work with the Colorado Department of Human Services and their local public health agency (LPHA) for approval. Day camps, including mobile, youth sports camps, and outdoor camps, must operate with restrictions and strong precautionary measures, as specified in the guidance

    “I know this has been a very different school year than many students were expecting, and thanks to the success of our social distancing efforts so far, Colorado kids will be able to enjoy day camps and youth sports camps this summer in as safe a manner as possible. The risk, though less, is still very real, and it’s up to families to make the best decisions that work for them. We also appreciate the critical role that day camps, along with daycare which has already been operating in as safe a manner as reasonably possible, play in supporting working parents,” Gov. Polis said. 

    Effective May 25, 2020 private campsites are open. If a host county would like to keep campsites closed, county commissioners should consult with their local public health agency, and then notify the Colorado Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and CDPHE in writing. Campgrounds in the State Park system are already open.

    “Our outdoors are part of who we are as Coloradans, and our campgrounds provide more people with the opportunity to safely enjoy Colorado’s natural beauty at a safe distance from others,” said Governor Polis. 

    Executive Order D 2020-049, which closed ski resorts has expired. Ski resorts may work to secure approval from their local authorities in order to open.

    Read the FAQ document here and the Executive Order here. A Public Health Order will be released tomorrow, Tuesday. The Safer at Home Executive Order has been amended and extended until June 1, 2020 to reflect these changes.

    The Governor will hold a media availability tomorrow at 1:30 p.m. More details to follow. 

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    05/20: Signs Executive Order

    DENVER - Gov. Polis today signed an Executive Order allowing the operation of alternate care sites in Colorado. 

    “In the event that a COVID-19 infection surge threatens to overwhelm our healthcare resources, the State may activate alternate care sites (ACS) to increase hospitals’ capacity to provide care to COVID-19 patients. The ACSs will be used to provide care to COVID-19 patients who no longer require inpatient hospitalization but still require some medical care and observation to ensure their safety and well-being while recovering from COVID-19,” the Executive Order reads. 

    To read the full Executive Order, click here

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    05/18: Agreement on the Disbursement of Federal CARES Act Funds

    DENVER - Governor Jared Polis, in collaboration with legislative leadership, announced today the allocation of $1.674 billion in federal funds from the CARES Act that will immediately support the State’s robust response to the COVID-19 crisis as well as key investments needed for economic recovery. 

    “COVID-19 has taken the lives of too many Coloradans and disrupted our way of life, and this has been a very challenging time for our entire state. I am grateful for the support we have received from the federal government, but there will still be hardship ahead. This immediate disbursement ensures that no Coloradan has to go without a hospital bed when they need one, that the state can continue to scale up testing and containment, and protect our most vulnerable. It allows parents to return to work by ensuring that our schools have needed resources to adapt to our new reality and helps our frontline local governments in their coronavirus response. My administration is working closely in a bipartisan way with the federal delegation and legislative leadership to do everything in our power to help Coloradans overcome this generational challenge. The steps we are taking now will allow us to increase much needed economic activity in our state,” said Gov. Polis.

    “This agreement quickly channels over $1.6 billion directly to our school districts, universities and local governments to help them retain first responders, support our health care workforce, protect our veterans and seniors and rapidly expand contact tracing so we can safely restart our economy. Schools and universities can use it to help them prepare for the fall so parents can go back to work and we can rebuild our workforce. I look forward to the bipartisan work ahead to allocate the remaining funds and pass legislation that helps Coloradans and small businesses get through this crisis.” Speaker KC Becker, D-Boulder. 

    “The CARES Act funding is an indispensable lifeline for our state––helping us ease the immediate economic and public health pains caused by COVID-19. But it’s nowhere near enough in terms of recovery,” said Senate President Leroy Garcia. “As members of the legislature, we will continue working hard alongside the Governor and the Joint Budget Committee to protect Coloradans during this challenging time. However we need Congress to do much more, especially for those communities like mine in Pueblo that the CARES Act explicitly left behind.”

    Governor Polis signed an Executive Order today authorizing the following transfers:

    1. For Medical expenses and Public health expenses incurred or expected to be incurred in the State’s Disaster Emergency Fund, $48 million transferred for FY 2019-20 and $157 million set-aside for FY 2020-21. This includes amounts expected to be distributed to local public health agencies for COVID-19 response.
    2. For Expenditures to comply with public health measures pertaining to maintaining veterans living facilities, State prisons and other State facilities with congregate care, including sanitation and effectively implementing social distancing measures, $2 million transferred for FY 2019-20 and $8 million set-aside for FY 2020-21. These funds will be available to improve the safety of our prisons, veterans living facilities, youth services centers, and mental health facilities.
    3. For Expenditures incurred to respond to second-order effects of the emergency, including caseload increases for at-risk pupils and human services programs during the COVID-19-driven recession, $2 million transferred for FY 2019-20 and $57 million set aside for FY 2020-21.
    4. For Expenses to respond to second-order effects of the emergency, including payments for emergency rental and mortgage assistance, as well as additional direct assistance where appropriate, for individuals that have been economically impacted by COVID-19, with preference given to individuals that are ineligible for other forms of assistance such as unemployment insurance, food benefits, or direct federal stimulus payments, $10 million transferred for FY 2019-20.
    5. For Expenses associated with the provision of economic support in connection with the COVID-19 public health emergency, including payments to stimulate the economy by supporting Colorado’s workforce with school-aged children, $500 million transferred to local school districts and proportionally by student population to the Charter School Institute and the Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind and $25,000 to each Board of Cooperative Education Services (BOCES) in the state for a total of $510 million above the Constitutionally required state share of public school finance to increase free instructional hours for our kindergarten through 12th grade education system while complying with COVID-19 public health orders, including facilitating distance learning and social distancing for in-person contact hours, and mitigating lost learning, and $450 million transferred to public institutions of higher education to increase student retention and completions, given Colorado’s critical shortage of skilled workforce. 
    6. For Payroll expenses and other necessary State expenditures for public safety, public health, health care, human services, and similar employees whose services are substantially dedicated to mitigating or responding to the COVID-19 public health emergency, $85 million set aside for FY 2019-20 and FY 2020-21, including at the Office of the State Controller for expenses related to accounting for and monitoring the use of federal funds related to the COVID-19 public health emergency.
    7. Expenses of local governments that did not receive a direct distribution of funds in the CARES Act to facilitate compliance with COVID-19-related public health measures, $275 million for FY 2019-20 and FY 2020-21. 

    These resources will support local communities both directly, as funds flow from State agencies to local partners, and indirectly. A significant portion of the allocation for the public health response will flow directly to local county public health agencies to ensure we have a robust statewide response through testing and contact tracing.  In addition to these funds, our local communities are receiving significant federal resources, including $125 million to Colorado communities from the Department of Health and Human Services, more than $16 million in Community Development Block Grants, $8 million in Community Services Block Grants, and an estimated $30 million to local governments for COVID-19 testing. 

    In addition to these funds, the state of Colorado has already received or is expected to receive, several direct transfers to fulfill critical needs including $2.25 million and as much as $8 million for crisis counseling and mental health support, $15.4 million in LEAP funds to help Coloradans pay their home heating bills, and $9.1 million in Byrne Justice Assistance grants to support local law enforcement adopt to COVID-19.  The administration looks forward to engaging with the legislature on how to best serve Coloradans with these funds.  

    The Governor sent a letter to the legislature today. 

    The remaining $70 million in unallocated funds will be transferred to the General Fund for appropriations for when the legislative session resumes.

  •  

    05/18: COVID Relief Fund

    DENVER — Gov. Polis and the Colorado COVID Relief Fund today announced the third round of grants given to Colorado organizations working with those who have been impacted by the coronavirus. 

    “We’re excited to announce this new round of grants to help those impacted by COVID-19,” said Governor Jared Polis. “We know this is a difficult time for many Coloradans and these organizations are on the ground, working in their communities to provide support. It’s times like these when we see the best in each other, when we lend a helping hand to one another. We want to thank everyone who has donated their money and time to help provide relief to Coloradans across our state.”

    Through three rounds, the Fund received 2,451 applications for a total request of $54.2 million. 505 organizations have received grants for a total of $11.1 million. Grants have been disbursed to organizations located in 56 counties in Colorado that are serving all 64 counties.

    Funds for deadline four (Saturday, May 16 at 7 p.m. MT) will be distributed in the Impact and Recovery priority categories. Funds for deadline four are intended for community-based organizations mitigating impact and preparing for recovery.

    To see the full list of grantees in Cycle 3, click here. To see the full list of applicants Cycles 1-3, click here. For the donor list, click here

    To learn more about the Relief Fund, visit www.helpcoloradonow.org.

  •  

    05/18: Expanded Testing Capacity

    WHEAT RIDGE — Gov. Polis provided an update on the state’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic at the STRIDE Community Health Center in Wheat Ridge and addressed the state's increased testing capacity. 

    Today Governor Polis announced that Colorado has reached a critical goal, and now has the supplies and capacity to test anyone with COVID-19 symptoms. On April 29, Gov. Polis set the goal of testing all symptomatic Coloradans by mid-May. At the time, the state was only able to test some symptomatic individuals. With the increased capacity, Gov. Polis is now encouraging anyone with symptoms to get tested for the virus. 

    “Getting tested is a crucial part of our response to this virus, and I’m proud to say that any Coloradan who is showing symptoms, can and should get tested,” said Governor Jared Polis. “This ensures that infected individuals get the care they need, and prevent spreading the virus to others. This is an all-hands on deck effort for Coloradans. Significant progress in expanding testing had been made through our partnership with cities, counties, hospitals, community health clinics, and retailers in every corner of the state.”

    Colorado can now test:

    • Any individual who has COVID-19 symptoms
    • Any individual who is employed as a health care worker, nursing home worker or first responder
    • Any essential worker who directly interacts with the public while working, per state or employer guidelines

    During the press conference, the Governor was tested for COVID-19 and expects to receive results in 48 hours. 

    The Governor was joined by Dr. Savita Ginde, Chief Medical Officer for STRIDE and Ben Wiederholt, STRIDE’s CEO. STRIDE offered its first COVID test in mid-March and has continued to help the state scale-up testing. As a community health center, they have gone above and beyond to provide testing, despite having a much smaller budget than many private partners. 

    There are four ways that Coloradans can get tested:

    • Health care providers
    • Local community-based testing sites
    • Specialized testing sites
    • Private sector partners

    Coloradans can get tested at no cost. The Division of Insurance has directed Colorado-regulated insurance plans not to charge copays for testing, and Medicaid patients can also get tested without cost. For individuals without insurance, community testing sites can send samples to the state lab and the state will cover the cost. In addition, Coloradans shouldn’t be worried about losing their jobs if they test positive for COVID-19 as most Colorado businesses are now required to provide paid leave for those who test positive.

    There are two types of test available: Viral (swab based) testing and Antibody (serology) testing. Viral tests determine if the virus is present in a person’s body. They are most relevant for diagnosing new infections quickly after a person has become infected, and help contain the spread. Antibody tests test for the body's response to the virus, and can be used in research to provide information about where the virus has been and the extent of its spread, but can’t be used in individual patient care due to outstanding scientific questions.

  •  

    05/14: Communities Come Together

    DENVER - Gov. Jared Polis, individuals, and communities across Colorado are coming together this Friday evening at 7 PM MT to honor and remember the more than 1,000 Coloradans that  we have lost to COVID-19. Friday, May 15 is also Peace Officers Memorial Day, which the state will commemorate by lowering flags to half staff and we  encourage Coloradans across our state to commemorate as well.

    “This global pandemic has cost 300,000 lives across the world and over 1,000 in Colorado alone. Too many Coloradans have lost family members and friends to this deadly virus, and we honor and celebrate their lives especially because many victims couldn’t have proper in-person funerals, remembrances, and wakes,” said Governor Jared Polis. “This is a challenging moment for many of our friends and neighbors and to those Coloradans who are struggling: you are not alone and we are all in this together. We still have work to do to stop the spread of this virus and can defeat this virus by staying home as much as possible, wearing facial masks when in public, and washing our hands regularly. Together we can avoid burying and remembering more Coloradans far too early.”

    Coloradans can participate by wearing a protective face covering or masks for a minute of silence to display their effort to do their part to save lives at 7:00 p.m. They can also post on social media to raise awareness about the remembrance event. 

    To recognize the Day of Remembrance, the State Capitol, along with cities, counties and other organizations, will be turning their lights red at 7:00 p.m. to honor those who have passed. The state is encouraging buildings and businesses across the state to turn their lights red at 7:00 p.m. and for police and fire departments to turn their lights on at 7:00 p.m. for one minute. Additionally, cities may consider creating a Proclamation to commemorate this event.

    At the time of this release, the following cities, counties have confirmed that they will participate:

    City and County of Broomfield

    City of Lone Tree

    Town of Kersey

    City and County of Denver

    City of Louisville

    Town of Lyons

    City of Alamosa

    City of Loveland

    Town of Mancos

    City of Arvada

    City of Manitou Springs

    Town of Monument

    City of Aurora

    City of Northglenn

    Town of Morrison

    City of Boulder

    City of Pueblo

    Town of Mountain Village

    City of Burlington

    City of Sheridan

    Town of Mt. Crested Butte

    City of Castle Pines

    City of Thornton

    Town of Nederland

    City of Centennial

    City of Victor

    Town of Oak Creek

    City of Colorado Springs

    City of Westminster

    Town of Pagosa Springs

    City of Commerce City

    City of Wheat Ridge

    Town of Palisade

    City of Craig

    City of Woodland Park

    Town of Paonia

    City of Dacono

    City of Yuma

    Town of Parachute

    City of Durango

    Commerce City

    Town of Parker

    City of Edgewater

    Town of Avon

    Town of Rangely

    City of Englewood

    Town of Bennett

    Town of Red Cliff

    City of Federal Heights

    Town of Blue River

    Town of Severance

    City of Fort Collins

    Town of Breckenridge

    Town of Silverthorne

    City of Fort Morgan

    Town of Carbondale

    Town of Silverton

    City of Fountain

    Town of Crested Butte

    Town of Telluride

    City of Fruita

    Town of Dillon

    Town of Vail

    City of Glendale

    Town of Dolores

    Adams County

    City of Glenwood Springs

    Town of Elizabeth

    Boulder County

    City of Grand Junction

    Town of Estes Park

    Douglas County

    City of Greeley

    Town of Frederick

    Elbert County

    City of Greenwood Village

    Town of Frisco

    Lake County

    City of Gunnison

    Town of Garden City

    Las Animas County

    City of La Junta

    Town of Granby

    Park County

    City of Lafayette

    Town of Grand Lake

    Pueblo County

    City of Lakewood

    Town of Green Mountain Falls

    Summit County

    City of Lamar

    Town of Gypsum

    City of Littleton

    Town of Keenesburg

    The following sports organizations have confirmed that they will participate: 

    Kroenke Sports & Entertainment

    at the Pepsi Center

    Empower Field 

    at Mile High

    Colorado Rockies 

    at Coors Field

  •  

    05/04: Governor Polis Signs Executive Order

    DENVER - Gov. Jared Polis today signed Executive Order D 2020 057. This continues the extension for filing and remitting state and state-administered local sales tax until May 20, 2020.

    “The economic impacts of COVID-19 are significant, and threaten to undermine the economic stability of many Coloradans and local businesses. The risk of contamination posed by COVID-19 has necessitated closure of multiple businesses. Employers and employees in virtually all sectors of the economy have been hard hit. We must take action to shore up economic security, employment, community cohesion, and community recovery including showing flexibility with tax payments,” the Executive Order reads. 

    This EO is an extension of Executive Order D 2020 023.

  •  

    04/30: Governor Innovation Response Efforts

    DENVER - As part of Colorado’s response to COVID-19, Colorado’s Office of eHealth Innovation (OeHI) is expanding access to telehealth resources for Coloradans. The state is developing a coordinated and collaborative approach to health information technology and digital health solutions in partnership with the Innovation Response Team (IRT). OeHI and the eHealth Commission are moving forward critical and strategic infrastructure projects to support Coloradans through the COVID-19 emergency response and beyond. 

    “Colorado has moved swiftly to secure funding and launch new innovations so health providers and Coloradans can access and use telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Lt. Governor and Office of Saving People Money on Health Care Director Dianne Primavera. “I am seeing health providers and community leaders reach out to those in need in new and different ways. Mental health centers, hospitals, community organizations and clinics across Colorado have gone from in-person care to virtual visits in a matter of days. By using telemedicine to treat individuals and families in their own homes we are not only slowing the spread of COVID-19, but making it easier for Coloradans to get the physical and behavioral health care they need during this challenging time.”

    “For years, OeHI has been piloting technology, infrastructure, and payment models to expand the use of telemedicine. In response to this unprecedented situation, our state and local governments, health providers, tech community, and payers have acted quickly and are using telemedicine to provide care for Coloradans to keep them healthy and safe during the pandemic,” said Carrie Paykoc, Director of the Office of eHealth Innovation and Chair of the Innovation Response Team Telemedicine Task Force. 

    As part of the Innovations Response Team (IRT) Telemedicine effort, OeHI set up a leadership team to drive telemedicine technology, policy, and communications efforts during COVID-19. The chairs of each IRT Telemedicine Sub-Task Force include Rachel Dixon, CEO of Prime Health and eHealth Commissioner, Kyle Legleiter, Senior Director of Policy at the Colorado Health Foundation, and Cara Bradbury, Project Lead with OeHI. The goal of this effort is to ensure access and use of telemedicine for both patients and health providers.  

    Coloradans interested in learning more about telehealth should visit COVID-19.Colorado.gov or StayHomeColorado.Colorado.gov for more information. The IRT has worked closely with the Governor’s Office and Department of Public Health and Environment to add information about telehealth and what options exist for Coloradans and for health providers

    As a result of the Governor’s Telehealth Executive Order and Emergency Regulations from Health Care Policy and Financing (HCPF) and the Department of Insurance (DOI)- health providers and communities are providing health care with telemedicine for both physical and behavioral health- in new and innovative ways. Within two days, the Mental Health Center of Denver went from in-person visits to 100% virtual visits for all of their mental health services. Without the recent emergency policy changes to Medicaid reimbursement this would not be possible. Additionally, Aurora Mental Health is providing care to their patients for routine mental health services, crisis, and withdrawal management (detox) using telemedicine phone calls, which is allowed in Colorado for uninsured and Medicaid clients. In addition to mental health needs OeHI, together with the eHealth Commission and the IRT is also focused on supporting individuals in rural communities and those most vulnerable during the pandemic.

    To guide this work in the coming days, weeks, and months, Governor Polis and Lt. Governor Primavera are relying on the OeHI and eHealth Commission to oversee, coordinate, and strategize health IT policy, infrastructure and innovation in a way that leverages the lessons learned through the innovation response, as well as existing foundational efforts established through Colorado’s Health IT Roadmap, which focuses on leveraging Colorado’s health information exchanges (Colorado Regional Health Information Organization and Quality Health Network) to provide trusted infrastructure. As part of this work, OeHI and the eHealth Commission have launched a Statewide Data/Information Governance on Health Committee facilitated by the Colorado Health Institute to develop a flexible framework for the use and access of health information. 

    For those interested in sharing their telemedicine efforts, the OeHI is asking local communities, community-based organizations and health providers to share their stories. Please complete this form. This information will be used to inform learning collaboratives, policies, infrastructure and funding opportunities.

  •  

    04/29: Update on State Response to COVID-19

    DENVER - Governor Jared Polis today provided an update on the State’s response to COVID-19, reiterated the importance of Safer at Home, and discussed the State’s testing strategy. 

    “These next few weeks are critical and I know Coloradans will continue to be safer at home as much as possible and wear masks when in public,” said Governor Jared Polis. “Testing is an important puzzle piece to Colorado’s response to this pandemic and the state continues ramping up our testing capability, infrastructure, and epidemiological work and will continue to aggressively seek resources through the private sector and federal government. When this crisis began the state could only run 140 tests per day and we have increased that capacity 20-fold, with more to come.”

    To date, 67,094 tests have been conducted in Colorado. Colorado has been running 3,000 tests per day, and there is the lab capacity to run 10,000 tests, but supply constraints don’t allow for that yet. The goal is to increase testing from 3,000 to 5,000 per day by the early May and up to 8,500 by the end of May. In order to reach testing goals, Colorado is working to increase testing supplies, availability of testing, and epidemiological capacity. Testing will help the State identify those who are sick, identify hotspots around the State, and protect those who are vulnerable, but it must be accompanied by isolation or quarantine and follow-up contact tracing to get maximum suppression impact.

    There are two types of COVID-19 tests: nasal swabs and blood tests. Nasal swab tests can diagnose whether people have COVID-19; blood tests typically measure the body’s response to the virus and not the presence of the virus itself. Colorado is still in need of a number of testing supplies to conduct swab tests including:

    • PPE: Gloves, masks, eye gear, and gowns
    • Lab: Extraction and detection reagent
    • Test: Test kits and swabs
    • Equipment to do testing

    Currently, those who can be tested include symptomatic health care and frontline workers, symptomatic hospital and nursing home patients, symptomatic workers and others in outbreaks, and some symptomatic community members. By May 15, the State hopes to also include all symptomatic community members, as well as broader outbreak testing. The State is also working to build a robust program to prevent hotspots in senior, long term care, and congregate care facilities, and other vulnerable populations such as people experiencing homelessness.

    There are four types of testing sites in Colorado: 

    • Private sector hospitals and health care facilities
    • Local community based testing sites
    • Targeted testing for outbreaks and at-risk populations
    • Collaborations between the State and private sector partners

    Through a contract with the Colorado School of Public Health, CDPHE has grown its COVID-19 epidemic response team from 31 staff to 56 staff, nearly doubling capacity to perform outbreak response, case investigation, and contact tracing work. The new students will undergo training this week and begin case investigation and contact tracing work next week, working closely with State and local public health staff.

    The Governor also provided an update on testing at senior living facilities. There have been a total of 1,171 tests run with 99 positives (55 Symptomatic, 33 asymptomatic, 11 unknown) at four facilities. In addition, today there is testing happening at the Veterans Community Living Center at Fitzsimons in Aurora. The State is also partnering with Colorado State University to test 45,000 nursing home workers in the coming months. By May 1, the State expects to have weekly supplies of 85,521 masks, 388,733 gloves, 7,840 gowns, and 10,413 pairs of eye protection for nursing home workers. 

    The Governor also provided an update on the Equity Task Force and announced its members today. Members include:

    • Congressman Joe Neguse 
    • Farduus Ahmed, Hope Communities
    • Harry Budisidharta, Asian Pacific Development Center
    • Lizeth Chacon, Colorado People's Alliance
    • Eudelia Contreras, Lake County Build a Generation
    • Maggie Gomez, Center for Health Progress
    • Joline Dorce, Dawn Clinic
    • Rudy Gonzales, Servicios de la Raza
    • Reverend Amanda Henderson, Interfaith Alliance of Colorado 
    • Deidre Johnson, Center for African American Health
    • Adrianne Maddux, Denver Indian Health and Family Services
    • Denise Maes, ACLU Colorado 
    • Kenny Maestas, Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition
    • Omar Montgomery, Center for Identity and Inclusion-University of Colorado Denver 
    • Priscilla Montoya Vitello, Latino Community Foundation
    • Michelle McHenry-Edrington, Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition
    • Rosemary McDonnell-Horita, Atlantis Community, Inc. 
    • Rosemary Lyttle, NAACP
    • Ricardo Perez, Hispanic Affairs Project
    • Alex Sánchez, Roaring Fork Latino Network and Voces Unidas
    • Carmen Stevens, San Luis Valley Immigrant Rights Center
    • Representative from the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe  
    • Representative from the Southern Ute Tribe

    Click to see the Governor’s presentation.

    View the news conference on the Governor’s Facebook page and view the ASL version here

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    04/28: Transition to Safer at Home

    Gov. Polis Provides Update on Transition to Safer at Home

    DENVER - Governor Jared Polis today provided an update on Colorado’s transition to Safer at Home and discussed how this will impact Coloradans. The Governor also discussed the Executive Order and Public Health Order from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment that outlines Safer at Home requirements. 

    “The Stay-at-Home order has done just what we wanted it to - slowed the spread of the virus and bought us time to expand the capacity of our health care system. We are in this for the long haul, and Coloradans need to be prepared to follow social distancing requirements in the weeks and months ahead,” said Governor Jared Polis. “If Coloradans let up over the next few weeks, if we fail to take this new phase seriously -- we might have to face staying at home again and all of our gains will be lost. I cannot stress this enough - we must continue to stay home as much as possible, wear facial masks  when out, and be cautious and careful. We are nowhere near being back to normaL, but we will get through this together.” 

    In March, the Governor outlined a number of goals for the Stay-at-Home order which included:

    • Slowing the spread of the virus
    • Buying time to build health care capacity
    • Buying time to acquire masks, gloves, ventilators, etc.
    • Buying time to grow testing capacity & obtain supplies.

    The state continues working to increase testing capacity and acquiring more critical personal protective equipment and supplies, but Colorado’s Stay-at-Home order has met the short-term goals the Governor identified last month.

    Safer at Home is meant to provide a more sustainable way of living for Coloradans, while managing the spread of the virus to ensure our healthcare system has the capacity to manage an influx. Goals of this period include:

    • Managing the spread of the virus (R0 between 2 and 1)
    • Accessing to world-class health care for every Coloradan that gets sick
    • Finding a more sustainable way to live 
    • Helping more Coloradans earn a living, while protecting health and safety
    • Minimizing secondary health effects (mental and behavioral health impacts)

     The Safer at Home Executive Order is set to expire 30 days from April 27, but can be amended or extended at any time. 

     Changes happening during Safer at Home will be phased in, with different changes going into effect April 27, May 1 and May 4. 

    Monday, April 27

    Retail businesses can open for curbside delivery. Real estate home showings can resume. Elective medical and dental procedures may resume if facilities are following required safety protocols. 

    Friday, May 1

    Retail businesses can phase-in a public opening if they are implementing best practices. 

    Personal services can open if they are implementing best practices.

    Monday, May 4

    Offices can reopen at 50% reduced in-person staffing capacity, if best practices are being implemented to protect the health and safety of employees. Businesses are encouraged to allow employees to continue telecommuting at higher levels if possible. Child care facilities can also expand or reopen if they are following Safer at Home requirements.  

    Vulnerable populations and seniors must continue to stay at home except when absolutely necessary. It’s important to note that even as some businesses begin more economic activity, no vulnerable worker can be compelled back to work if their work requires in person work near others. against their will. Given the severity of COVID-19 on vulnerable individuals it’s not in the state’s interest, the employer’s interest, or the worker’s interest to unnecessarily expose them to these very real risks. It’s also important to note that it’s illegal to discriminate against vulnerable workers. 

    Colorado is a diverse state and the Governor knows each community will have different needs. Under the Safer at Home phase, local governments will have a variety of options when it comes to slowing the spread of the virus and protecting their communities. 

    • Local governments can implement the guidelines of Safer at Home to match the state.
    • Local governments can go farther than the state, including but not limited to stay-at-home orders or additional protective measures.
    • Local governments can relax guidelines more than the state. To do so, local governments will need to demonstrate proof of 14 consecutive days of decline of infection of COVID-19 in the county. They also must
    • submit an application to CDPHE that includes a written COVID-19 suppression plan approved by the appropriate local public health authority, all hospitals within the jurisdiction and elected leadership.

    View the Governor’s presentation and find the Frequently Asked Questions document. View the Executive Order and view the Public Health Order. Watch the Governor’s press conference and watch ASL

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    04/21: State Response

    DENVER - Today Governor Jared Polis discussed modeling data that shows how Coloradans are doing their part during the stay-at-home order and what next steps will look like as health and safety restrictions change in the coming days and weeks. 

    “Coloradans in every corner of our state have stepped up and taken responsible steps to help bend the curve of this pandemic and we are grateful for these shared efforts that helped save lives and slow the spread. The deadly virus will continue to be with us, and we must wear masks and socialize less to avoid its rapid growth. For seniors and those with pre-existing conditions, it’s important to stay home whenever possible through May. Though we are moving into a sustainable way of living during this pandemic, there are tough days ahead,” said Governor Jared Polis.

    “This is a marathon - not a sprint, which was the easy part - now we need to pace ourselves and these distancing measures need to be sustainable. We’re going to have to learn to live with coronavirus for a while, but we must live not with anxiety or fear, but with extreme caution, especially if you are a member of a vulnerable population. I am thrilled that we are on the path to a sustainable way of living more safely, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t the potential that we have to return to a more cautious approach if the state sees a spike in new cases.”  

    The Governor discussed new modeling showing the state will not need to extend the Stay-at-Home order that is set to expire at the end of the week, but will need to continue a variety of long-term social distancing measures. The modeling shows that the Stay-at-Home order has reduced social interactions by 75-80% since it went into effect. Currently, Colorado has 10,000 reported cases, however, the state believes the real number is closer to 65,000-75,000 Coloradans -- about 1.1%-1.3% of the population. 

    There are three levels of social distancing, which include: Staying at Home, Safer at Home, and Protect our Neighbors. On April 27, the state will be moving onto the Safer at Home phase. During this phase Coloradans will no longer be ordered to stay home, but are still strongly encouraged to do so. Vulnerable populations and seniors must continue staying home except when absolutely necessary and K-12 school districts and postsecondary institutions will continue to suspend normal in-person instruction until the end of the school year.  

    It’s important to note that there may be a fluctuation between the levels to recover from outbreaks, meaning that Colorado could return to the Stay-at-Home phase if there is a significant increase in cases or spread of the virus.

    Local governments will have the opportunity to implement stricter restrictions, particularly those who may be experiencing an outbreak. 

    For more details on what the Safer at Home phase of the pandemic looks like, please view the Governor’s presentation here

    The latest Colorado model report is now available to the public.

    Watch the Governor’s news conference here. To stay up to date, visit COVID19.Colorado.gov

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    04/16: Social Distancing

    Gov. Polis Presents Key Indicators That Will be Considered in Modifying Colorado’s Social Distancing Guidance

    DENVER – Governor Jared Polis announced the key indicators that are guiding Colorado’s process for ongoing updates to policies, guidance, and requirements on statewide social distancing measures. These will be used to get the state through COVID-19 pandemic while minimizing loss of life and further economic disruption.

    “Coloradans have done an amazing job of staying at home. Staying at home whenever possible is likely to remain one of the most important, if not the most important tool we have to flatten the curve and save lives. But we also know that we are in this for the long haul. It is likely to be many months until there is a vaccine or herd immunity, and we need a way of life that is sustainable psychologically and economically while meeting the health goals spelled out today,” said Gov. Jared Polis. “As we reopen our state, we know that things will work differently than they did before, and we must enshrine social distancing in the way we live, work, and play in a sustainable way for a matter of months. The science and data will provide the information we need to adapt our policies to build upon what works and change what isn’t working.”

    The Governor thanked Coloradans for working together to help flatten the curve and save lives. The Governor also noted that expanding capacity for health care beds is on track. Gov. Polis is focused on sustainability and ensuring that Coloradans are able to safely earn a living without the risk of running out of hospital beds after the expiration of the stay-at-home order.

    Current steps to stop the spread of COVID-19, including the temporary closure of bars and restaurants in Colorado communities, the state’s stay-at-home order, and the cultural adaptation of mask-wearing, have yielded positive results in slowing the spread of COVID-19. But these swift measures have also taken a toll on the state and local economies and threatened the state’s health care system and most vulnerable populations.

    Until Colorado builds immunity - through a vaccine or herd immunity - or until scientists are able to deliver a truly effective clinical treatment, the state will need to:

    • Implement social distancing measures in an economically and psychologically sustainable manner 
    • Ensure the capacity to care for those who are ill (COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 related illnesses) without sacrificing the quality of care
    • Increase efforts to prevent infection in vulnerable Coloradans 

    The Governor outlined three stages for the state’s response to COVID-19: urgent, stabilization, and recovery. Colorado is currently in the urgent phase and the Governor discussed how Colorado will get to stabilization and recovery.  

    The state of Colorado continues working toward a return to a sustainable way of life that protects public health and the economy. Key elements of that strategy include:

    • Increasing the capability to protect Coloradans and communities through forms of testing and support for those who test positive or have been exposed. 
      • Increased testing 
      • Testing must be coupled with robust containment efforts locally, regionally, and statewide. 
      • Robust containment includes: Expanded contact tracing capacity; Increased epidemiology staff; Expanded isolation support services.
    • Reducing the spread to vulnerable Coloradans who are at risk.
      • Taking additional steps to protect nursing homes, senior care facilities. 
      • Action plan for responding to outbreaks as they occur 
    • Hospitals and health systems managing increased demand.
      • Hospitals have internally increased beds
      • New beds through additional alternative care sites:
        • Ranch, Larimer County Fairgrounds and Events Complex
        • Colorado Convention Center in Denver
        • St. Anthony North in Westminster
        • St. Mary-Corwin Medical Center in Pueblo
        • Western Slope Memory Care in Grand Junction 
    • Businesses maintaining physical and social distancing. 
      • Non-critical businesses will need to engage in similar social distancing measures, which will be enforced, as the critical businesses are during this period of time including but not limited to wearing masks,
      • physical distancing, staggering shifts, and allowing telecommuting to the extent practicable

    These key indicators will inform ongoing monitoring and potential modifications of social distancing measures, like reinstating stay-at-home orders at the community level, regionally or statewide if necessary.  

    Within the next five days, the state expects the data and the science to determine what level of suppression the stay-at-home order has achieved. Also within the next five days, the state expects to have the data and science to determine what level of ongoing social distancing Coloradans need to strive for to effectively manage the future spread of COVID-19. 

    Moving forward, the state will be reporting facility-level data on a weekly basis. This information will include the name and type of the facility, date the outbreak occurred, and total cases reported there. Data will cover health care, correctional and other settings. This can include long-term care facilities, assisted living facilities, state prisons, county and city jails, factories, schools, child care centers, and more. There are currently 231 nursing facilities, 706 assisted living facilities and 21 intermediate care facilities in Colorado. In addition, the Colorado Hospital Association has announced that hospitals will now be releasing information about discharges. 

    To view the Governor’s presentation click here

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    04/14: Additional Action

    Gov. Polis Takes Additional Action to Limit Spread of the Coronavirus 

    DENVER - Gov. Jared Polis today signed two Executive Orders to limit the spread of COVID-19. 

    The Governor signed Executive Order D 2020 035, amending Orders D 2020 007 and D 2020 021, which supports emergency child care for essential workers and temporarily suspends certain statutes, enabling schools and school districts to focus on delivering instruction and student services. Read the Executive Order here

    The Governor also signed D 2020 036 extending Executive Order D 2020 005, as amended by Executive Order D 2020 008, which limits in-person contact for the 2020 elections and the secretary of state’s operations. The Executive Order is extended by an additional 30 days. Read the Executive Order here

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    04/13: Hotel and Motel Owners

    Gov. Polis Urges Hotel and Motel Owners to Provide Rooms for State’s Most Vulnerable 

    DENVER - Today Gov. Polis sent a letter encouraging hotel and motel owners and operators to rise to the challenge in addressing COVID-19 by entering agreements to temporarily house homeless Coloradans, along with some of the state’s most vulnerable.

    The need for non-congregate rooms is urgent as there is a real potential for currently sheltered people to be forced into large scale, dangerous facilities or back onto the streets. The letter encourages hotel and motel owners to work with their local leaders to find innovative solutions on this vital effort. Read the letter here

    The Governor also sent a letter in response to the General Assembly, Denver City Council and RTD Board, saying that he will mobilize 250 Colorado National Guard (CONG) members to support existing shelters in the City and County of Denver with staffing shortages for those who are experiencing homelessness during the COVID-19 pandemic. The state will also be providing planners from the CONG to support local emergency operation centers and help stand up an expansion of capacity through new shelters through the use of recreation centers, hotels, or motels, if requested.

    The CONG will also help increase hospital capacity for those who need medical care and ensure those experiencing homelessness have access to those resources. Read the letter here. 

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    04/08: Stay at Home Guide

    Gov. Polis Provides Update on Colorado Response to COVID-19, Announces StayAtHomeCO Guide

    DENVER - Governor Jared Polis provided an update today on Colorado’s response to COVID-19 and announced a stay at home guide for Coloradans.

    “Everyone is working hard, doing their part, and giving what they can so that we can defeat this virus and get back to normal life here in our great state. This is a critically important time for Coloradans to stay at home to do our part to help save lives,” said Governor Jared Polis. “I know that for so many Coloradans, our faith plays an important role in our lives. We want all Coloradans to have the chance to celebrate the upcoming religious holidays with their loved ones safely. Even though we can’t be together physically, we can be together emotionally and spiritually.”

    Gov. Polis discussed important guidelines the administration has released for upcoming religious holidays Coloradans of different faiths will be celebrating, including Easter, Passover, and Ramadan. The Governor encouraged faith leaders to offer online or drive-in services in order to serve their congregations or safely accommodate worshippers by ensuring a six-foot distance between them. 

    Other guidelines are:

    • Staff should still be kept to the least amount of people possible;
    • Each person should wear a protective face mask covering; 
    • Coloradans with symptoms shouldn’t come to help or listen for risk of spreading coronavirus;
    • Those in a vulnerable age group or who have a respiratory or auto-immune condition should stay home;
    • Consider providing hand sanitizer and asking about signs of illness prior to admitting; 
    • Sanitize all equipment and use the CDC’s and CDPHE’s cleaning guidance. 

    The Governor has held numerous calls with faith leaders during this pandemic and was joined by Rev. Henderson has served as the Executive Director of The Interfaith Alliance of Colorado.

    Read the guidance here.  

    The Governor also announced new online resources for Coloradans in the form ofhttps://stayathomeco.colorado.gov/ which includes free resources to support Coloradans while they are at home, from wellness, to services, to education, to entertainment and more. Coloradans can also visit covid.colorado.gov to get information from all state agencies, including the Department of Public Health and Environment’s COVID19.colorado.gov which has the most recent available data. 

    The Governor also provided an update on the Help Colorado Now relief efforts. To date, Coloradans have donated nearly $10 million, with $1 million of that coming from more than 5,000 donors. Coloradans can visit www.helpcoloradonow.org to donate their time or money to the relief efforts. 

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    04/06: Extended Stay at Home Order

    DENVER - Gov. Polis signed Executive Orders today taking further action to address COVID-19 in Colorado. 

    Gov. Polis signed an Executive Order amending and extending D 2020 017 to extend the state-wide stay at home order until April 26, 2020. View here. The Governor also rescinded Executive Order D 2020 013 requiring all Colorado employers to reduce their in-person workforce by 50%. This is being rescinded because it is superseded by the stay at home Executive Order. Read the Executive Order here

     The Governor also signed an Executive Order extending D 2020 012, which limits evictions, foreclosures, and public utility disconnections, as well as expedites unemployment insurance claims processing. Read the Executive Order here

     Gov. Polis is taking steps to help families and businesses by extending additional tax filing and payment deadlines. Gov. Polis signed an Executive Order issuing a one-month extension for filing and remitting state and state-administered local sales tax. Read the Executive Order here

     In addition, the Governor extended Executive Orders on the temporary suspension of elective and non-essential surgeries and procedures, the closure of ski areas, the suspension of in-person requirements for notarizations, and the issuance of marriage licenses when county clerk and recorder offices are closed, as well as the suspension of other regulatory requirements, including clarifications to alcohol delivery and takeout, requirements related to taxicab carriers, in-person processes for background checks, and driver’s license and identification card renewal, due to the presence of COVID-19. 

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    04/03: Colorado Mask Campaign

    USE FACEMASKS BUT DON’T ABANDON SOCIAL DISTANCING, HYGIENE RECOMMENDATIONS

    DENVER - Governor Jared Polis today announced the Colorado Mask Campaign which encourages individuals to wear non-medical cloth face masks when they go out for essential business due to COVID-19 pandemic. Public health officials also urge people to not expect the masks to protect against the virus and become lax on critical social distancing and proper hygiene measures. 

    The recommendation by the Governor to wear a mask is voluntary but is being requested to protect the most vulnerable community members, to sustain the health care system for the next few months and to slow the spread of COVID-19.

    “We are recommending people wear cloth masks, not the medical masks, as it is critical we save those for our health care professionals,” said Dr. Chris Urbina, medical director for the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment. “Remember, wearing a face mask is not a substitute for social distancing, washing your hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based solution and coughing into your elbow or a tissue.”

    Urbina reminds people that when wearing a face mask, avoid adjusting the mask and touching your eyes, nose and mouth. “If you are sick stay at home,” he added.

    Public health officials are requesting the public refrain from buying and using critical medical masks and other personal protective equipment that healthcare workers need to do their job safely and effectively.

    The public is asked to use fabric masks beginning today and those coverings can include bandanas, scarves, sewn fabric masks or by repurposing a t-shirt or dish towel to fit your face. The masks should cover the nose and mouth. All cloth masks should be worn once and then washed with hot water and soap before wearing them again.

    The Centers for Disease Control has announced that 25% of people infected with COVID-19 are asymptomatic and spreading infected respiratory droplets. A face covering helps lower the risk of spreading by someone who may be sick and not realize it. Cloth face coverings can be worn to reduce the spread of large droplets. This can help prevent community spread when people travel from their homes for necessary activities like grocery shopping. Individuals should also wear masks while recreating.

    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the most vulnerable in Pueblo by:

    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.
    • Stay home when you’re sick.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:

  •  

    03/30: Colorado Case Updates

    DENVER - Gov. Jared Polis provided an update on Colorado’s response to COVID-19 as well as information on current cases in Colorado, including the number of cases, hospitalizations, and fatalities. Gov. Polis was also joined by Dr. Marc Moss, head of pulmonology at the University of Colorado - Anschutz Medical Campus and a doctor at UC Health who came to represent the thousands of medical professionals working on the front lines in Colorado. 

    While the virus is still spreading rapidly in Colorado, our community will start to see the effects of the recent steps we’ve taken in the coming days and weeks. In the near-term, it is crucial that we all stay home whenever possible to avoid jeopardizing the health of their friends, family, and community,” said Governor Jared Polis.

    “During this challenging time, though we must be distant physically from one another for our health, I encourage Coloradans to remain close to our loved ones through different forms of communication like telephone and video chat and through acts of kindness.”

    “As a pulmonary specialist, I have been on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic. We’re seeing this virus significantly impact Coloradans of all ages and we are now caring for an unprecedented number of critically ill patients,” said Dr. Marc Moss. “Our health care system is preparing for the worst and hoping for the best. We continue working alongside our fellow health care workers to ensure we are doing everything we can to care for our patients.”

    The Governor continued to urge Coloradans to stay home. Gov. Polis discussed the supplies that the state Colorado has requested from the federal government, what has been distributed thus far and what the remaining need it currently has and what is needed for Colorado to effectively slow the spread of the virus and protect the health and safety of Coloradans. 

    The Governor also discussed state traffic data as an important proxy to demonstrate the impact of recent social distancing and stay-at-home measures. Colorado has seen a 60% reduction of cars on the road over the last four weeks. This data was collected across the state on interstates, U.S. and state highways, and other roads from a network of more than 50 automatic traffic recorders (ATRs).

    These ATRs provide traffic count data that can be analyzed hourly, daily, and weekly and used to compare current traffic levels to baseline levels. Traffic levels can show changes in behavior, whether that’s a reduction in weekday work commuting, and changes in weekend driving that may be associated with errands or recreation. Between March 1-25, the average daily volume of vehicles is decreasing by 400 cars per day. View the presentation here

    On Saturday, March 28, the federal government approved a Major Disaster Declaration request for Colorado, unlocking access to more federal resources for the state. This designation, combined with the legislation passed by Congress and signed by the President, is welcome relief on both the emergency management front and the economic front. The Governor has held daily calls with Colorado’s federal delegation 

    On Sunday, March 22, Gov. Polis announced the creation of the Innovation Response Team (IRT). Today he announced the appointment of Sarah Tuneberg, an entrepreneur and emergency manager with more than a decade of public health and emergency management experience, as the Director of the IRT. The IRT is building a mass testing program for the COVID-19 virus, creating a suite of services for citizens under isolation or quarantine, developing mobile and other technologies to help track the spread of the virus and support infected citizens, and developing locally-sourced alternatives for constrained critical medical supplies.

    Watch today’s press conference here

  •  

    03/30: New Executive Order

    DENVER - Gov. Polis signed an Executive Order temporarily suspending the personal appearance requirement before notarial officers to perform notarizations. 

    The Executive Order also authorizes the Secretary of State to promulgate and issue temporary emergency rules in order to facilitate remote notarization.  

    Read the Executive Order here

  •  

    03/28: Major Disaster Status

    Gov. Polis Secures Major Disaster Status for Colorado

    DENVER - On Wednesday, March 25, Governor Polis submitted an urgent request to the federal government to help Colorado deal with the COVID-19 pandemic. Today, Governor Polis announced that President Trump and the federal government had approved the Governor’s request in declaring a Major Disaster for the State of Colorado. 

    “Colorado is now eligible to receive additional federal resources to help address the global epidemic impacting our state, the nation, and the world. This declaration ensures that Colorado can be on a level playing field with other states that already have this status like New York and Washington when it comes to federal disaster funding and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) assistance,” said Governor Polis. “Now more than ever, it’s important that Coloradans stay home whenever possible. I thank the members of Colorado’s federal delegation who advocated for this funding to recognize the seriousness of this public health crisis unfolding hour by hour in our state. We are forging new and innovating partnerships daily with the federal government and the private sector to minimize the health threat and the economic threat of the virus.” 

    Colorado is one of the states with the highest presence of COVID-19 on a per-capita basis, with a unique situation unfolding in our mountain communities. Colorado continues facing a shortage of resources in addressing this pandemic. 

    Read Governor’s Polis request which was supported by the majority of Colorado’s federal delegation here.  The Governor has engaged with Colorado’s congressional delegation daily on multiple calls and efforts to prioritize areas of federal relief. Members of Colorado’s federal delegation sent a letter to the President on Thursday urging him to approve Governor Polis’ request. Read their letter here. 

    California, Washington and New York have received these declarations

     

  •  

    03/25: Stay at Home Order

    Gov. Polis Announces Statewide Stay-At-Home Order, Provides Update on Colorado Response to COVID-19 

    ***INFORMACIÓN SEGUIDA EN ESPAÑOL***

    CENTENNIAL - Today Gov. Polis announced a statewide stay-at-home order beginning on Thursday, March 26 at 6:00 a.m. and will last until April 11, 2020. The Governor also provided an update on the state’s response to COVID-19 and actions taken to limit the spread of the virus. 

    “Coloradans are living through a global pandemic and this decision was made to help save lives,” said Governor Jared Polis. “We will continue doing everything we can to get the resources Colorado needs to address COVID-19 and protect the health and safety of all Coloradans. In true Colorado spirit, we’re seeing our friends, family and neighbors rise to the challenge, donating their time, money or extra supplies to support relief efforts at the state and local levels. We are in this together and this is the season to stay at home to save lives.” 

    This executive order means Coloradans should not be leaving their homes except for critical activities including: 

    • Obtaining food and other household necessities including medicine
    • Going to and from work if you are a critical employee
    • Seeking medical care
    • Caring for dependents or pets
    • Caring for a vulnerable person in another location
    • Cannabis and liquor stores will remain open 
    • Or participating in outdoor recreation at a legally-mandated safe distance of six feet or more from other parties

    Read the full order here. Read the FAQ here. Read the public health order here. Watch the press conference here.  

    Colorado continues facing a shortage of resources in addressing this pandemic, which is why the Governor sent a letter to the Trump administration urging the president to declare a Major Disaster for the State of Colorado. A major disaster declaration would free up resources for medical care, housing, unemployment assistance, crisis counseling, hazard mitigation and more. California, Washington and New York have received these declarations. Read the request here. 

    While the state is facing a shortage of resources, Coloradans are stepping up to try and fill the gap. More than 7,000 Coloradans have already signed up to volunteer on www.helpcoloradonow.org, nearly 1,300 of which have medical training. The Colorado COVID Relief Fund has also raised more than $7 million since launching late last week. 

    Gov. Polis requested and received dual-status commander authority to ensure unity of command, allowing regular, federal military units to be controlled by a single commander representing the Governor. This will help to eliminate confusion and conflict and allow the state to streamline the utilization of military personnel in this response.

    The Governor announced that the state lab has eliminated its backlog and there will be new labs coming online at the University of Colorado, Colorado State University, University Hospital, and Children’s Hospital. The Governor thanked CSU and CU for their willingness to test the personal protective equipment the private sector is ramping up that the state needs now. 

    Governor Polis also provided an update on the federal stimulus package which included $377 billion for small business loans and grants, $1200 in direct cash assistance to Americans based on income eligibility.

    The Governor also provided an update on the Innovation Response Team, introducing two new members: Lucy Sanders and Tim Miller. Lucy is the CEO and a co-founder of the National Center for Women & Information Technology and will head up Isolation Services. The objective is to provide people who are in self-isolation or home quarantine with critical supplies like food and access to health care, and also ancillary services to make their at-home experience as comfortable as possible. Tim Miller is the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Rally Software and will head the Software Development Team. The objective is to build applications and web sites for both government and citizens to manage all aspects of the crisis, and provide the state with key data. 

    The Governor also noted that the Innovation Response Team is working as hard as they can to identify manufacturers and supply chains, but urged the private sector to help in this effort.

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    03/20: Grand Princess Passengers

    Colorado welcomes home 39 Colorado passengers from the Grand Princess cruise ship

    DENVER, March 20, 2020: The State of Colorado is welcoming home 39 cruise ship passengers who have been under U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) quarantine since their ship docked in California on March 9. 

    As requested by Governor Jared Polis in a letter to HHS Secretary Alex Azar, all passengers returning to Colorado are asymptomatic at the time of travel. If passengers were symptomatic in any way, they remain in federal care and will not be returning to Colorado at this time. 

    The 39 Coloradans will fly into Denver International Airport on March 20 at 3:30 p.m. on private charter airplanes and will not enter the concourses or main terminal. They will return to their homes via private vehicle or state-provided private van and will continue to self-quarantine until they have been in quarantine for a full 14 days, which includes their time in federal quarantine. 

    Forty-three Colorado residents were passengers on a Grand Princess cruise ship that docked at the Port of Oakland on March 9. Some passengers aboard the Grand Princess cruise ship experienced symptoms of COVID-19. Asymptomatic passengers have been in federal quarantine at the Dobbins Air Reserve Base, Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, and Travis Air Force base. 

    Two of the 43 Coloradans will be returning on a different flight from Dobbins Air Reserve Base in Atlanta, Georgia. This flight has not yet been scheduled. An additional two passengers are currently symptomatic at Travis Air Force base and will be returning to Colorado at a later time.

    Passenger demographics for the 43 Colorado passengers from the Grand Princess cruise ship:

    In order to protect passenger privacy, we are not releasing individual information about any passengers.

    The Coloradans will be returning to their homes in these cities: Aurora, Boulder, Castle Rock, Colorado Springs, Denver, Edwards, Ft. Collins, Greeley, Lakewood, Littleton, Longmont, Loveland, Westminster, Wheatridge, Windsor

    Ages:
    • 80s: 3
    • 70s: 15
    • 60s: 14
    • 50s: 4
    • 40s: 1
    • 30s: 2
    • 20s: 2
    • <18: 2

    To respect and protect passenger privacy, we ask that members of the media do not stage at the airport before the flight arrives. In order to be accommodating, the state suggests that media who are planning to shoot do so after the passengers have left the airport. There will be a media staging area at the Signature Flight Support building at the Denver International Airport. There will be no official statement or opportunity for interviews. 

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

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    03/19: Federal Loan Assistance

    Gov. Polis Secures Federal Loan Assistance for Colorado’s Small Businesses 

    Approval Unlocks Billions in Economic Recovery Loans for Small Businesses Impacted  by COVID-19

    DENVER – Colorado small businesses impacted by COVID-19 can seek individual small business loans up to $2M as part of the Small Business Administration’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan program. Small businesses throughout all 64 counties may seek SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loans. Governor Jared Polis announced that Colorado’s application for federal disaster area designation has been approved.  

    “The economic impact of COVID-19 has been felt across our state. We are committed to protecting public health and safety and will continue fighting to ensure the pain that Colorado’s small businesses are feeling is limited. This critical designation allows small businesses in all 64 Colorado counties to seek federal recovery loans that can help them through this challenging time. I thank the Colorado federal delegation for their efforts to help unlock this assistance,” said Governor Polis. 

    The SBA Disaster assistance provides low-interest federal loans for working capital to Colorado small businesses that have realized economic injury from COVID-19. Funding was appropriated through the US congressional Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act.  

    “Colorado’s Office of Economic Development and International Trade is committed to helping our small businesses access these vital funds,” said Executive Director Betsy Markey. “Eligibility information, loan application links and emerging economic recovery resources can all be found at choosecolorado.com.” 

    “Small businesses are the fabric of our economy and their success is dependent on the ability to freely market products and services to communities across the state and world,” said SBA Regional Administrator Dan Nordberg. “Local small businesses are bearing the brunt of that impact and facing a severe decline in customer traffic.  SBA’s top priority is to assist businesses adversely impacted by the Coronavirus (COVID-19) and our Economic Injury Disaster Loans can be the working capital lifelines they need to weather this difficult time.”

    Small businesses, private non-profit organizations, small agricultural cooperatives and small aquaculture enterprises impacted by COVID-19 can seek federal loans to pay key needs such as fixed debts, payroll, and accounts payable.

     

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    03/17: Public Places Closing

    To prevent COVID-19 Spread

    Closed starting at 8:00am - March 17, 2020 for 30 days

    • Restaurants and bars
    • Movie and performance theaters
    • Casinos
    • Gyms
    • Breweries
    • Coffeehouses

    Restaurants may offer a delivery service, window service, walk-up service, drive-through service, or drive-up service.

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    03/16: Economic Impacts

    Economic Forecast Shows COVID19

    Impacting Economy

    DENVER - Today, the Office of State Planning and Budgeting released the March economic forecast showing the significant economic impact of COVID-19. The overall economic impact is difficult to anticipate and depends on both the extent to which the epidemic can be slowed or contained and the effectiveness of federal fiscal and monetary policy interventions. 

    “COVID-19 has impacted the global economy and is having a significant impact on our state’s economy as well. I would call the economic situation in complete flux, and until we have a much better idea what’s going on I wouldn’t put much stock in any economic forecast, although we know the news isn’t good,” said Governor Polis.

    “My top priority during this time is protecting the health and safety of Coloradans which also minimizes damage to our economy. We’re doing everything we can to minimize the long-term economic impact of this global pandemic and ensure that Colorado is prepared to come back stronger than before when this crisis is over.” 

    While Colorado’s economy has expanded since the December forecast, the rapid spread of the COVID-19 virus poses a significant risk to the state’s economy. Economic activity is expected to slow sharply over the coming months as schools and businesses close and consumers stay home in an attempt to slow the spread of the pandemic. While this forecast projects that consumer and business activity will return to normal levels relatively quickly once schools and businesses reopen, there is an increasing risk that extended closures could trigger a recession as consumers stay home and workers and businesses lose income.

    As in Colorado, the economic outlook for the U.S. has deteriorated since December due to the recent expansion of COVID-19 into the country and the economic losses associated with widespread emergency closures of schools and businesses. Despite strong economic momentum in recent months, a sharp decline in economic activity is expected but there is still uncertainty. 

    General Fund revenue is expected to grow 1.2 percent in FY 2019-20 after growing by 7.2 percent in FY 2018-19. The General Fund revenue projection was revised down from the December forecast by $301.2 million in FY 2019-20 and $400.5 million in FY 2020-21 due to the expected impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. The primary General Fund revenue streams affected include individual and corporate income taxes and sales taxes.

    With these updated revenue projections, the General Fund reserve now is projected to be $225.8 million below the Governor’s requested statutory reserve amount of 7.5 percent of appropriations in FY 2020-21 under the Governor’s budget request, as amended January 15, 2020.

    Cash fund revenue is projected to remain flat in FY 2019-20 after growing by 5.8 percent in FY 2018-19. The forecast for FY 2020-21 is lower than the December forecast by $52.8 million, due largely to lower expected severance tax collections caused by lower oil prices after Saudi Arabia’s March 9th announcement that it would increase production volumes. Cash fund revenue is projected to grow by 1.5 percent in FY 2020-21 and 1.6 percent in 2021-22.

    Revenue subject to TABOR is not expected to exceed the Referendum C cap in either FY 2019-20 or FY 2020-21 after exceeding the cap by $428.3 million in FY 2018-19. TABOR revenue is not expected to exceed the Referendum C cap again until FY 2021-22, when the projected surplus is $216.6 million.

    To see the forecast presentation, click here

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    03/15: Ski Areas Closing

    Gov. Polis Issues Executive Order Suspending Down Hill Ski Area Operations for One Week 

     DENVER - Governor Jared Polis issued an executive order this evening in response to COVID-19 (coronavirus). 

    “Never would I have believed that a global pandemic would force the temporary closure of our world-class ski resorts. I have been skiing since I was four years old. Our family has had a place in Vail for three decades. And, like so many Colorado families, we were planning a ski trip with our kids over their spring break next weekend. Beyond being a major part of our way of life, skiing supports our workers and businesses,” said Governor Polis.

    “For those of us who treasure living our lives outdoors, sacrificing our fun is the easier part; but for those who depend on employment in our Colorado high country, the uncertainty of how long they will be out of a job is terrifying. It is with a profound sense of pain and grim responsibility that I take the agonizing action that this moment demands. I take solace in knowing that while we will be temporarily closed for business, we will be saving the lives of hundreds, perhaps thousands of Coloradans in the days and weeks ahead.”

    COVID-19 is a highly contagious viral disease that has spread throughout many of Colorado’s communities including our mountain communities where premier ski resorts are located.  Public health officials have concluded that disease control measures aimed at specific individuals or groups are no longer sufficient to contain the further spread of the virus.  

    “The challenges posed by COVID-19 are unique and place significant burdens on hospitals and medical personnel.  We are aware of the great cost that mountain communities face if our downhill ski resorts close, even temporarily.  These costs will be borne by local residents and businesses, and by the individuals and families who come to Colorado to enjoy our beautiful mountains and world-renowned skiing.  But in the face of this pandemic emergency we cannot hesitate to protect public health and safety,” the executive order reads. 

    The executive order directs downhill ski resorts to suspend operations for one week to slow the spread of COVID-19  and conserve medical resources in the state’s mountain communities. 

    The Governor will continue to monitor the course of the COVID-19 outbreak in the state and may amend this Executive Order accordingly.

    Read the full executive order here.

Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment

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    07/01: Safer-At-Home public health order allowing professional sports to resume and temporarily closing bars

    DENVER, July 1, 2020:  The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) released an amended Public Health Order 20-28 for the Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors phase. The order is effective until July 30.

    The new guidance and changes are listed below:

    • Professional sports may resume pre-season practices, training, and league play after receiving approval from CDPHE on a reopening plan that details disease prevention and mitigation strategies.
    • Bars that do not serve food from a licensed retail food establishment must close to in-person service. Bars that offer food from a licensed retail food establishment for on-premise consumption and follow the restaurant requirements - including seating all patrons at tables a minimum of 6 feet apart - may operate up to 50% of the posted occupancy limit or 50 patrons indoors, whichever is less. Additionally, bars may use the calculator for indoor events  to allow for occupancy up to 100 patrons indoors.  All bars may continue to operate to-go, curbside and delivery service.
    • Libraries are no longer limited to curb-side only services, though curbside services are encouraged.
    • Real estate open houses may occur in accordance with indoor event requirements.

    “We have started to see an increase in cases and are making every effort to prevent transmission of this virus,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Rachel Herlihy. “Bars are more likely to have people congregating and mingling in close proximity, and for longer duration. We have updated the public health order to limit the operation of bars and other alcohol establishments to be in line with our current level of disease transmission.”

    For extensive information on Safer-at-Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors phase, including sector-specific guidance, please visit covid19.colorado.gov/safer-at-home

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

  •  

    07/01: State provides tips for enjoying a safe Independence Day holiday

    DENVER, July 1, 2020 -- As Coloradans get ready to celebrate Independence Day weekend, state officials ask everyone to continue acting responsibly to limit the spread of COVID-19 and to follow all fire restrictions. Colorado has made great progress, but we don’t want our summer fun to result in more cases. We all share the responsibility for protecting the workers we interact with, our loved ones, and higher-risk populations. While celebrating, Coloradans should:

    • Wear a face-covering when around others. 
    • Convene only in small groups.
    • Maintain 6 feet of physical distancing.
    • Follow all local COVID-19 guidelines and fire restrictions. To check fire conditions and restrictions, visit www.colorado.gov/dfpc/fire-restriction-information
    • Avoid risky activities that could lead to COVID-19 exposures or physical injuries. To learn about how to stay safe and assess risks, visit covid19.colorado.gov/risks-benefits

    “With the freedom that we celebrate this weekend comes responsibility,” said Scott Bookman, the state health department’s Incident Commander for COVID-19. “We hope everyone will keep taking the daily preventive steps -- especially wearing masks and practicing physical distancing -- to protect themselves and their communities. And with people out picnicking and barbecuing, it’s crucial to think ahead and plan for frequent hand-washing.”

    Coloradans who choose to travel should check with the local public health agency at their destination to make sure they are up to date on guidelines, restrictions, and COVID-19 related rules. Those looking to explore the vast, great outdoors should check out COTREX to see what trails, trailheads, and activities are allowed on state and federal public lands -- and to see which places are not crowded.

    Coloradans also should take steps to prevent fires. It’s fire season, and this year Coloradans need to be especially careful, both due to high fire danger and the added risks and complexity that COVID-19 adds to the equation. The actions of all Coloradans can prevent situations where people have to evacuate their homes and firefighters and first responders have to deploy to camps. Additionally, we want to prevent air pollution from smoke, which could impact those who are at higher risk for severe illness. 

    Public officials are also asking Coloradans to avoid risky behaviors this weekend to maintain our current sufficient levels of emergency response capacity for hospitals, search and rescue, and first responders.

    “We really need everyone to get through this weekend with all of their fingers intact,” Bookman said. “Usually we see a lot of emergency room visits on Independence Day. Right now our hospital capacity is good, but we need people to play it safe and stay out of the hospital if you can.”

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

  •  

    06/30: Protect-Our-Neighbors roadmap

    DENVER, June 30, 2020: The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) today announced the final roadmap for local communities to qualify for the Protect our Neighbors phase of the COVID-19 response. Local communities will be able to qualify for this status to gain more local control in their communities if they meet certain criteria, including low viral transmission and preparedness of the public health agency to successfully respond to an increase in cases. Once communities meet certification criteria, submit a surge mitigation plan, and are approved by the state, they will be able to permit activities at 50% of pre-pandemic capacity, with at least 6 feet between non-household members, and no more than 500 people in one setting at a time. 

    “This is the gold standard of pandemic preparedness, and it is a goal for our communities to aspire to. Not all of our communities will be able to achieve this goal immediately, ” said Jill Hunsaker Ryan, executive director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. “It’s going to be up to all of us to keep wearing masks, washing our hands, and keeping our distance. We need to all do our part to keep transmissions low and prevent a surge on our hospital systems.”

    Next week, CDPHE will provide more information and training on the process for applying for certification, as well as grant funding that will be available to help communities enhance their COVID-19-related planning and infrastructure.

    Three things will enable a community to qualify for Protect-Our-Neighbors certification status:

    • Low disease transmission levels (including stable or declining COVID-19 hospitalizations or fewer new cases in the past two weeks),
    • Local public health agency capacity for testing, case investigation, contact tracing, and outbreak response (including the ability to test 15 people per 10,000 residents per day; the ability to conduct case investigation and contact tracing for at least 85% of assigned cases within 24 hours; a plan that documents the ability to investigate and contact trace their share, based on population, of our state’s overall 500 cases per day goal; and strategies to offer testing to close contacts of outbreak-associated cases)
    • Hospital ability to meet the needs of all patients and handle the surge in demand for intensive hospital care (including the capacity to manage a 20% surge in hospital admissions/patient transfers and two weeks of PPE available.)

    A county may seek to qualify for Protect Our Neighbors by themselves, or voluntarily form a “region” with neighboring counties. Communities that can demonstrate strong public health and health care systems -- paired with low virus levels -- can take on more control over their own reopening plans and help the state avoid statewide shutdowns. 

    “Protect Our Neighbors empowers local governments, public health agencies and partners to meet the needs of their communities and scale their response,” said Hunsaker Ryan. “If communities are successful in controlling the outbreak locally, the state will not have to rely on suppressing the virus through extreme statewide shutdowns.”

    Protect Our Neighbors requires all Coloradans to continue to support and protect people who are at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19, including older adults and people with underlying medical conditions. It’s important to remember that different communities may be in different phases -- Stay-At-Home, Safer-At-Home, or Protect Our Neighbors -- and may move between levels during this pandemic. Communities that are able to loosen restrictions under Protect Our Neighbors may need to tighten restrictions again to Safer-at-Home or Stay-at-Home levels if they see case increases, outbreaks, or a surge on their hospital systems.

    The Protect-Our-Neighbors metrics were drafted by a workgroup consisting of epidemiologists and public health experts from the CDPHE, the University of Colorado School of Public Health, and local public health agencies from across the state. The group included representatives from urban, rural and frontier counties. In addition, the workgroup consulted health care coalitions and health care systems leadership in drafting treatment metrics. They met over the course of five sessions and reviewed scientific literature, case studies, and expert consultation to develop metrics that would achieve the goal of ensuring that they signify a systems readiness for broader reopening.

    In order to help support communities’ ability to achieve success, the state is making additional federal CARES Act funding available: 

    • Planning Grant of up to $50,000 to engage consultants and community partners, and to fund community engagement efforts with communities impacted by and at increased risk.  
    • Infrastructure Strengthening Grants of up to $300,000 (up to $150,000 in state funds + local match) to invest in technology; community resource coordination; communication activities to increase compliance with the public health orders; funding for community-based partners and cultural brokers; and enhanced prevention and containment efforts. 

    For extensive information on Protect-Our-Neighbors, including guidance for communities to qualify for this phase, please visit covid19.colorado.gov/protect-our-neighbors

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

  •  

    06/19: Amended public health order

    State health department releases amended public health order for Safer-at-Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors

    Additional activities, including events and bars, allowed with abundant precautions

    DENVER, June 19, 2020: The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) released an amended Public Health Order 20-28 for the Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors phase. This public health order allows bars to open following updated restaurant guidance and provides updated guidance for higher education, personal services, and manufacturing. It also outlines the steps required to allow residential camps and indoor and outdoor events to resume while minimizing the potential spread of COVID-19. 

    The department sought and incorporated feedback from the public and stakeholders before finalizing the guidance released June 18. The new guidance and changes are listed below.

    • Guidance for residential camps. This guidance allows groups of 25 or fewer campers outdoors and 10 or fewer indoors. Designated camp groups must not mix with other groups, and camps must train staff about COVID-19 precautions and be able to isolate sick staff or campers.
    • Guidance for indoor events and outdoor events. This guidance includes limiting capacity based on the square footage of the event space, implementing single-direction traffic and social distancing at entrances and exits, and booth layouts that promote social distancing. Planners can use this Social Distancing Space Calculator tool to calculate the appropriate square footage to keep staff and customers safe. This tool is based on a model built by Boulder County.
    • Guidance for bars and restaurants. This guidance increases the capacity at restaurants and allows bars to open, following the same guidance. Outdoor bar service may be done in conjunction with local authorities. The guidance also states that extra-large venues can possibly have more than 50 patrons, but should use the Social Distancing Space Calculator tool to determine how many additional patrons over 50 they can accommodate indoors, up to 100 patrons total.
    • Guidance for higher education.  The guidance encourages continued remote learning, but states that institutes of higher education may open up to 50% capacity per room, up to 50 people. Similarly, they can use the Social Distancing Space Calculator tool to determine how many students over 50 they can accommodate, up to 100 total.
    • Guidance for personal services. This new guidance allows for services that necessitate the removal of the customer’s mask or face covering (e.g. for facials, beard trims, etc.), as long as the service provider takes extra precautions, such as requiring them to wear a face shield while conducting the service. The new guidance reinforces the need for masks or face coverings to be worn at all other times, as well as the need to ensure a minimum of 6 feet of separation between work stations, customers, and customers and providers when services are not being performed.
    • Guidance for manufacturing. This guidance states that manufacturing may resume with up to 50% capacity per room, or up to 50 people, whichever is fewer. Worksites must implement procedures to ensure 6 feet of distance between employees, unless doing so impacts worker safety. Employees and visitors are required to wear masks or face coverings whenever possible, unless doing so would inhibit the employee’s health. 

    Public health orders establish requirements that Coloradans must follow while guidance documents provide clear instructions for how businesses and individuals can comply with the public health orders. 

    For extensive information on Safer-at-Home, including sector-specific guidance, please visit covid19.colorado.gov/safer-at-home

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

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    06/16: State health department seeks public input

    DENVER, June 15, 2020:  The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) is seeking feedback on additional draft guidelines for the Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors public health order. Coloradans can review draft guidelines in the following areas: 

    The deadline for providing feedback is Wednesday, June 17, at 5 p.m. The draft guidance may be updated based on stakeholder feedback and will be finalized on Thursday, June 18.

    CDPHE is also soliciting feedback on an upcoming public health order -- Protect Our Neighbors. The Protect Our Neighbors phase comes after Stay at Home and Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors phases. 

    Coloradans can review the draft framework, and provide feedback by Thursday, June 18, 11:59 p.m.

    Local communities will have the ability to enter the Protect Our Neighbors phase in late June, if they meet thresholds that will be defined in the order and guidance. Thresholds will include a local community’s ability to contain surges in cases and outbreaks through testing, case investigation, contact tracing, isolation, quarantine, site-specific closures, and the enforcement of public health orders.

    With more activities open and available to the public, it is everyone's responsibility to do whatever they can to reduce the spread of the disease. Always stay home when you are sick. If you go out, remember the big three: wear a face covering; wash your hands frequently; and maintain physical distance with others.

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

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    06/16: Risks and benefits of activities during the COVID-19 pandemic

    DENVER, June 16, 2020: As restrictions on gatherings are loosened, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has released a guide to help people understand the potential risks of travel and a variety of other optional activities.

    In Colorado, most things that can be done with prevention precautions in place are open. While there is no way to ensure zero risk of infection, deciding whether an activity is worth the risk is an individual decision.

    “People need to be informed, then use their judgement to make individual decisions about what works best for them, their household members, and their communities,” said state epidemiologist Dr. Rachel Herlihy, CDPHE. “We really need everyone’s help to contain COVID-19 in Colorado. We all need to have fewer interactions with fewer people while maintaining social distancing.”

    People should first consider whether they or the people they live with have any extra risk of serious illness from COVID-19, Herlihy said. People with extra risks should aim to limit in-person interactions with others as much as they can, and carefully consider the risks and benefits of activities in which they choose to participate.

    After that, there are a number of important considerations, including whether the activity is indoors or outdoors, the group size, and the amount of time spent doing the activity. And there are a number of ways to make activities safer, including wearing a face covering, spending less time, and maintaining physical distance.

    Visit the department’s risk and benefits web page to learn more.

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

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    5/27: Safer-At-Home public health order

    DENVER, May 27, 2020: In accordance with Governor Jared Polis’ executive order, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) amended two public health orders, extending Safer-at-Home and Voluntary and Elective Surgeries and Procedures. People at higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19 are urged to continue to stay home except for necessary medical care, and the general public is encouraged to stay at home as much as possible and limit social interactions. The public is also advised to wear masks or face coverings when leaving their home. 

    The Safer at Home Executive Order has been amended and extended until June 1, 2020.  According to that order, additional businesses can open with abundant precautions. This includes:

    • Private campgrounds, effective May 25.
    • Dine-in at restaurants, effective May 27. 
    • Day camps and sports camps for kids, effective June 1.
    • Curbside service at libraries.
    • Personal training at pools (indoor pools may have no more than 4 people).

    Also included in this public health order, ski resorts are allowed to work with their local public health agency to reopen. For extensive information on Safer-at-Home, including sector-specific guidance, please visit covid19.colorado.gov/safer-at-home.

    The second public health order extends the voluntary and elective surgeries and procedures public health order for 30 days. It is also updated to reflect revisions to dental practices based on new CDC guidance.

    All services included in the public health order are subject to physical distancing requirements. They are also encouraged to implement symptom monitoring protocols, including temperature monitoring and symptom screening questions, where possible. Additional guidance can be found here.  

    To see frequently asked questions, click here. The orders may be changed or extended again.

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

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    05/20: Repayment Agreement

    Denver, CO – May 20, 2020  The effort to fight COVID-19 has created economic hardships that have put some Coloradans in a struggle to pay their rent.

    Executive Order D2020 051 signed by Governor Jared Polis on April 30 placed a moratorium on evictions and late fees for failure to pay rent that will expire on May 30, unless it is extended. The same executive order grants the Colorado Department of Local Affairs (DOLA), Division of Housing (DOH) the authority to provide a template for renters and landlords to make payment arrangements, which may be initiated by either party to prevent late amounts from becoming immediately due when the moratorium expires.

    “The rental moratorium for people impacted by the pandemic is not a free month of rent, it’s a measure to protect the economy while keeping people safer in their home,” said DOH Director Alison George. “At the property level, when tenants pay their rent, landlords can pay their mortgages, pay for maintenance, and pay the staff necessary to operate their properties.”

    The MODEL Repayment Agreement for Tenants and Landlords resides on the DOH Eviction and Foreclosure Prevention website, along with other resources for Coloradans who need help in meeting their financial obligations for housing. Those who have accumulated past due rent are encouraged to take advantage of the MODEL Repayment Agreement template as soon as possible.

    In the Governor’s previous Executive Order DOLA received $3M in state emergency funds to assist with rental and mortgage assistance for families below 50 percent of the area median income (AMI). The division has an interactive map on their website to help families find resources due to COVID-19.  Coloradans can also call 211 to find the resources that best meet their needs.

    The MODEL repayment agreement is intended to help manage amounts due to keep people housed. Rental assistance may prevent families from getting too far behind in payments. These efforts are aimed at helping families across Colorado stay financially sound.

    “If you can pay your rent, you should,” George said. “These are challenging times that really show just how interconnected we all are.”

    DOLA’s Division of Housing is dedicated to the creation of affordable housing that is accessible, safe and secure for all Coloradans. For complete information on COVID-19 resources from DOH, visit: cdola.colorado.gov/housing-covid19

  •  

    04/28: Kaiser Permanente

    CDPHE and Kaiser Permanente expand testing capacity across the Front Range for health care workers and first responders

    (DENVER – April 28, 2020) – Kaiser Permanente is increasing COVID-19 testing for symptomatic member and non-member health care workers and first responders (emergency medical technicians, law enforcement, firefighters, corrections officers) referred by the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment (CDPHE). Kaiser Permanente is also testing non-members referred by CDPHE who have been deemed essential to public welfare.

    In partnership with CDPHE, Kaiser Permanente has been providing testing at eight tent site locations across the front range for non-member health care workers and first responders since March 27. They recently announced their ability to increase testing capacity at each location for non-members. Testing is available by appointment only and is intended for symptomatic individuals.

    Testing locations can be found at the Kaiser Permanente Loveland, Rock Creek (in Lafayette), Westminster, Lakewood, Aurora Centrepoint, Lone Tree, Parkside (in Colorado Springs), and Acero (in Pueblo) medical offices in Colorado. Hours of operation for the eight tents are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., daily. Rock Creek, Westminster, and Acero tents are not open on weekends.

    To schedule a test for non-members:

    • Health care workers and first responders from any part of the state who are not members of Kaiser Permanente should first contact CDPHE at
    • 303-692-2700 for initial screening. 
    • CDPHE will coordinate appointments for individuals who meet testing criteria.
    • All samples will be processed by the CDPHE state lab. Test results will be reported directly to each individual by the CDPHE.

    If you are a Kaiser Permanente member and are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms, please visit kp.org/coronavirus or call our 24/7 advice line at 303-338-4545 or 1-800-218-1059 (TTY 711).

  •  

    04/27: Western States Pact

    Colorado & Nevada Join California, Oregon & Washington in Western States Pact

    Western States Governors: Health outcomes and science – not politics – will guide decisions to modify stay at home orders

    DENVER – Colorado Governor Jared Polis and Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak today announced their respective states are joining California, Oregon and Washington in the Western States Pact -- a working group of Western state governors with a shared vision for modifying stay at home and fighting COVID-19.

    “Coloradans are working together to slow the spread of COVID-19 and have important information to share with and to gain from other states.  I’m thrilled Colorado is joining the Western States Pact,” said Governor Polis. “There’s no silver bullet that will solve this pandemic until there is a cure so we must have a multifaceted and bold approach in order to slow the spread of the virus, to keep our people safe and help our economy rebound.”

    “I’m honored to have the State of Nevada join the Western States Pact and believe the sharing of critical information and best practices on how to mitigate the spread, protect the health and safety of our residents, and reopen responsibly will be invaluable as we chart our paths forward,” said Gov. Steve Sisolak. “Millions of visitors from our fellow Western states travel to Nevada every year as a premier tourism destination, and this partnership will be vital to our immediate recovery and long-term economic comeback.”  

    California Governor Gavin Newsom, Oregon Governor Kate Brown and Washington Governor Jay Inslee recently announced they would be working together under a shared vision for gradually modifying their state’s stay at home orders and fighting COVID-19. They listed three shared principles as foundational to the agreement:

    • Our residents’ health comes first. As home to nearly one in five Americans and gateway to the rest of the world, the West Coast has an outsized stake in controlling and ultimately defeating COVID-19.
    • Health outcomes and science – not politics – will guide these decisions. Modifications to our states’ stay at home orders must be made based off our understanding of the total health impacts of COVID-19, including: the direct impact of the disease on our communities; the health impact of measures introduced to control the spread in communities —particularly felt by those already experiencing social disadvantage prior to COVID-19; and our health care systems’ ability to ensure care for those who may become sick with COVID-19 and other conditions. This effort will be guided by data. We need to see a decline in the rate of spread of the virus before large-scale reopening, and we will be working in coordination to identify the best metrics to guide this.
    • Our states will only be effective by working together. Each state will work with its local leaders and communities within its borders to understand what’s happening on the ground and adhere to our agreed upon approach.

    As part of the Western States Pact, the Governors commit to working together toward the following four goals: 

    1. Protecting vulnerable populations at risk for severe disease if infected. This includes a concerted effort to prevent and fight outbreaks in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities.
    2. Ensuring an ability to care for those who may become sick with COVID-19 and other conditions. This will require adequate hospital surge capacity and supplies of personal protective equipment.
    3. Mitigating the non-direct COVID-19 health impacts, particularly on disadvantaged communities.
    4. Protecting the general public by ensuring any successful lifting of interventions includes the development of a system for testing, tracking and isolating. The states will work together to share best practices.
  •  

    04/27: Safer-At-Home

    State health department releases Safer-At-Home public health order Launches Safer-At-Home website landing page

    DENVER, April 27, 2020: In accordance with Governor Jared Polis’ executive order, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) enacted a public health order, implementing Safer-at-Home. Per the order, some businesses can open with abundant precautions; people 65 and older and those at higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19 must continue to stay home; and the general public is strongly advised to stay at home and only leave for specific tasks. The order is intended to better support the state’s social, mental, and economic health while responding to this pandemic. 

    For extensive information on Safer-at-Home, including sector specific guidance, please visit covid19.colorado.gov/safer-at-home.

    All services included in the public health order are subject to physical distancing requirements and are still encouraged to implement telework options and staggered schedules when possible. They are also encouraged to implement symptom monitoring protocols, including workplace temperature monitoring and symptom screening questions, where possible. Additional guidance can be found here.  

    To read the latest version of the public health order, click here. To see frequently asked questions, click here. The order went into effect at 6 a.m. on April 27, 2020, and ends at 11:59 p.m. on May 26, 2020. The order may be changed or extended.

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

  •  

    04/23: Investigation Process for Positive COVID-19 Cases

    Pueblo, CO – Pueblo County residents who are tested for COVID-19 can be notified of their results numerous ways. Currently, those individuals who are confirmed positive for COVID-19 receive official notification from one of the following either the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment, their doctor or a lab.  

    When PDPHE officials are notified an individual has tested positive, they begin to investigate into whom the infected person may have been in contact with when they started experiencing symptoms. Common symptoms of COVID-19 include a cough, shortness of breath and a fever of 100.4 or higher. Other symptoms can include headache, chills, muscle pain and sore throat.  

    In addition to finding out who the infected individual had contact with, public health officials will investigate to what extent the interaction occurred. To be considered a contact, a person must be with the infected (tested positive) patient within 6 feet for more than 10 minutes. Anyone who is found to have been in contact with the infected individual will be advised to self-quarantine for 14 days and monitor themselves for any symptoms. If the individual begins to experience symptoms, they should isolate immediately and contact their health care provider.  

    When public health officials determine through the investigation that there are at least two or more confirmed COVID-19 positive cases in a facility or non-household group within a 14-day period, it will be classified as a COVID-19 facility outbreak. The facility will follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines and work with public health on the investigation in notifying workers and clients to contain the outbreak inside that facility. 

    When an investigation determines and outbreak may have spread outside of the facility, those at risk in the community with be notified.  

    “Because COVID-19 spreads quickly and easily through facilities among people who are in close proximity of each other, I want to assure the public if there is an outbreak at any facility in Pueblo County, everyone who is impacted will be notified in a timely manner,” said Randy Evetts, public health director of the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment.  

    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the most vulnerable in Pueblo by: 

    • Follow Governor’s order to stay at home through April 26. 
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities 
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people  
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them. 
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary. Contact your medical provider. 
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you are sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:  

  •  

    04/23: COVID-19 Testing Site Opens

    Pueblo, CO. – Local public health officials announced today the drive-up community testing site at the Colorado State Fairgrounds is now open to anyone who has symptoms of COVID-19.

    The testing site, which opened April 22, initially was opened for first responders, health care workers, anyone over the age of 65 and critical business employees. Testing is now expanded to include anyone from Pueblo County and neighboring counties who have symptoms of COVID-19, which include cough, difficulty breathing, a fever of 100.4 or greater, headache, chills, muscle pain and sore throat. No physician order is required.

    “This is a great opportunity for the Pueblo community to open testing to anyone who needs it,” said Randy Evetts, public health director for the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment. “We feel based on the other sites that have opened in the community to support first responders and health care workers, we believe we can safely extend testing at the state fair site to anyone who is symptomatic.”

    Evetts added anyone in surrounding counties who has symptoms of COVID-19 can be tested at the site.

    The testing site is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at the Colorado State Fairgrounds, 1001 Beulah Avenue (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue). The first 250 individuals daily will be tested. Anyone being tested must have identification and must be in an enclosed vehicle. No walk-ups or motorcycles will be allowed at the testing site.

    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the most vulnerable in Pueblo by:

    • Follow Governor’s Stay-At-Home order through April 26.
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.
    • Stay home when you are sick.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:

  •  

    04/21: Shooting Ranges Allowed to Open

    Pueblo, CO  Pueblo’s public health director, Randy Evetts, announced today the reopening of outdoor gun and archery ranges in the county.  Indoor ranges remain closed. 
     
    Shooting ranges have been closed since March 25 when Governor Jared Polis issued an executive order requiring non-critical businesses, organizations, and agencies to close.  Later some exceptions were clarified but gun ranges were not specifically addressed. 
     
    Local public health directors have sought additional clarification from the State regarding gun ranges but no information has yet been provided.  Given this delay, Evetts recommended the outdoor ranges be allowed to temporarily open under strict social-distancing guidelines to provide an opportunity for outdoor recreation. 
     
    Evetts noted, “Outdoor gun and archery ranges provide additional safe outdoor activities for our residents.  Shooters are usually in their own shooting alley or at individual shooting benches.  Social distancing is easily maintained at 6-feet or more between benches or alleys.” 
     
    Gun ranges are expected to follow all Public Health Orders regarding social distancing.  Patrons should wear a cloth face mask and wash their hands often.  Surfaces should be disinfected if possible.  In addition other guidelines must be followed including: 
    • No sale of food, beverages, ammunition or other supplies on site 
    • No rentals of guns or archery equipment 
    • No tournaments or events 
    • No fees or reservations will be made on site.  Reservations and payments should be made online or by other alternative methods.   
    “The opening of the outdoor ranges remains conditional on guidance from the Attorney General that might require closure and may be revoked in the interest of public health should the COVID-19 pandemic worsen in Pueblo County, “Evetts said. 
     
    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the most vulnerable in Pueblo by: 
    • Follow Governor’s Stay at Home Order to stay at home through April 26, 2020. 
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities. 
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people. 
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms or shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher.  Call your medical provider before visiting them. 
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary. 
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you’re sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched 
    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 
  •  

    04/21: FEMA-Sponsored Testing Site

    El Paso County, CO – The FEMA-sponsored COVID-19 testing site in El Paso County is expanding to Pueblo County. With additional testing resources becoming available in El Paso County, the FEMA testing site will greatly expand local testing capability and disease surveillance in Pueblo County.

    Testing will still be available in El Paso County at the UCHealth site, located at 175 S. Union Blvd. in the back parking lot. Testing is available for symptomatic health care workers, first responders and individuals over the age of 65. 

    Beginning Wednesday, April 22, 2020, the Pueblo County site will be open from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Up to 250 tests will be provided each day and will be offered Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday of each week through May. The following people experiencing symptoms are encouraged to come get tested:

    • Health care workers
    • First responders
    • Individuals who are over 65 years
    • Critical business workforce

    See below for more details on testing:

    • The site is located at Colorado State Fair Grounds, enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue
    • Individuals only need to bring a picture ID and organization ID, if applicable
    • Qualified individuals will be tested, regardless of insurance status
    • There is no cost for the testing, and no need to have a doctor’s prescription to receive testing
    • This is a drive-through site and you will not be getting out of your car
    • Please do not bring pets or others in your vehicle that will not be getting testing

    “Having this FEMA-sponsored testing site is a great local resource that benefits the entire Southcentral region,” said El Paso County Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Program Manager Lisa Powell. “We are excited that Pueblo County will be able to increase targeted local testing capability with the welcome addition of this site.”

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:    

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at  Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 8AM – 5PM, Monday – Friday 719-583-4444.  

    El Paso County Public Health also encourage residents and media to seek out credible, reliable information from the following sources:

    For media inquiries, please reach out to the Pikes Peak Regional Joint Information Center: (719) 299-7700.

  •  

    04/21: Additional Grant Funding

    Secretary DeVos Delivers $6 Billion in Additional Grant Funding to Support Continued Education at America’s Colleges, Universities

    WASHINGTON — After quickly making available more than $6 billion for colleges and universities to provide direct emergency cash grants to students, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced today an additional $6.2 billion is now available to higher education institutions to ensure learning continues. The funding is available through the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund authorized by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, signed into law by President Donald J. Trump less than one month ago. 

    “This pandemic has made clear every single education institution should make important investments to ensure learning continues when unexpected circumstances arise,” said Secretary DeVos.

    “Accordingly, the additional funds made available today can be used to expand remote learning programs, build IT capacity, and train faculty and staff to operate in a remote learning environment so that at any moment institutions can pivot quickly. I hope that institutions that already have robust remote learning capacity will consider using this funding to support additional emergency cash grants for students.”

    The CARES Act allows institutions to use up to one half of the total funds received to cover any costs associated with significant changes to the delivery of instruction due to the coronavirus. The funding for these “Recipient Institutional Costs” is separate from the funding previously made available for “Emergency Financial Aid Grants to Students.”

    In order to access the funds, higher education institutions must submit a Certification and Agreement for Recipient Institutional Costs, which can be found here. Institutions must also have executed the Certification and Agreement for Emergency Financial Aid Grants to Students before submitting the second certification and agreement. So far, about 50% of eligible postsecondary institutions have applied to receive the Emergency Financial Aid Grants to Students. 

    School allocations are set by a formula prescribed in the CARES Act, which is weighted significantly by the number of full-time students who are Pell-eligible but also takes into consideration the total population of the school and the number of students who were not enrolled full-time online before the coronavirus outbreak. The Department is utilizing the most recent data available from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) and Federal Student Aid (FSA) for this calculation.

    The funding allocations announced today are part of the nearly $31 billion Congress allocated to the Department to distribute to students, K-12 schools, and higher education institutions under the CARES Act. The Department, at the Secretary's urging, is working to make funds available as quickly as possible.

    The Department has taken quick action to support higher education students from the start of the coronavirus outbreak. Colleges and universities were given immediate regulatory flexibility so students' educations could continue online. Under the leadership of President Trump, the Department also provided student loan relief to tens of millions of borrowers by setting all federally held student loan interest rates to zero percent and allowing borrowers to defer payments for 60 days without interest. The CARES Act extends those benefits to six months.

    The Department also stopped all federal wage garnishments and collections actions for borrowers with federally held loans in default. And, within 13 days of President Trump signing the CARES Act into law, the Department made $6.2 billion available for emergency cash grants for higher education students. The Department has also disbursed $7 million to Gallaudet University and $13 million to Howard University in accordance with the CARES Act, which allocated this funding to help these unique institutions address the challenges associated with coronavirus.

    The Department continues to update ed.gov/coronavirus with information for students, parents, educators and local leaders about how to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

    For more information about COVID-19, please visit the following websites: coronavirus.govcdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html, and usa.gov/coronavirus.

    ###

  •  

    04/20: Pilot Symptom Tracker

    State health department launches pilot version of symptom tracker survey as part of statewide COVID-19 tracking

    (DENVER) April 17, 2020: The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) has launched a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even if the person experiencing symptoms is unable or does not need to get a test. Although the data collected using this survey cannot replace official case data confirmed by testing, it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in a given area or region. 

    The symptom tracker will appear on the “do you have symptoms?” webpage on the COVID-19 website. Data from the tracker will provide local public health agencies with data for their coverage area. This could help public health officials understand when outbreaks are occurring in given locations and, in some cases, follow up with certain individuals who may need additional support. Knowing about potential outbreaks more immediately can help inform decisions to take action at the local level. 

    Several local public health agencies had previously created their own symptom trackers over the last month. The results from their surveys will also be included in the aggregate data reports that CDPHE will eventually release publicly. 

    “If Coloradans are feeling symptoms related to COVID-19, such as a dry cough, fever and shortness of breath, they can serve the public health response by isolating themselves and voluntarily reporting those symptoms using the symptom tracker,” said Jill Hunsaker Ryan, Executive Director of CDPHE.

    Future versions of the symptom tracker will route people with COVID-19 symptoms to the appropriate resources for them. People who report their symptoms will be able to opt in to receive automated help managing their symptoms via text message. The system will route them to various resources, from telemedicine to behavioral health support.

    This survey will collect personal health information, which the department will safeguard, protect, and report only in aggregate. More information about how data will be collected, shared and protected is available on our FAQ page.  

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

     

  •  

    04/13: Race and Ethnicity Data

    DENVER, April 13, 2020: The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is releasing all available race and ethnicity data on reported cases of COVID-19 in the state. 

    The race and ethnicity data released today represents 75% of all reported COVID-19 cases. Cases with an unknown race or ethnicity are excluded from these calculations. 

    Initial disease reports to public health are often missing information on race and ethnicity. CDPHE is drafting a public health order to clarify the type of data the department needs from health care entities. The public health order will help the department have a more complete dataset moving forward. 

    Using the data available now, the percentage of cases is statistically higher for Hispanic, Black/African American, and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Coloradans compared to the overall population distribution. The following graph has more complete information about the percentage of cases and deaths by race and ethnicity:  

    Here are the cases collected and analyzed by race/ethnicity by number:* 

    • Total: 5188 cases with race and ethnicity data
    • American Indian or Alaskan Natives (non-Hispanic): 24 cases, 0.46% 
    • Asian (non-Hispanic): 116 cases, 2.24% (statistically lower)
    • Black or African American (non-Hispanic): 363 cases, 7.00% (statistically higher)
    • Hispanic: 1,458 cases, 28.10% (statistically higher)
    • Multiple racial categories (non-Hispanic): 96 cases, 1.85% (statistically lower)
    • Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (non-Hispanic): 29 cases, 0.56% (statistically higher)
    • Other: 38 cases, 0.73% (no test performed as population data do not include ‘other’)
    • White (non-Hispanic): 3,064 cases, 59.06% (statistically lower) 
    Here are the deaths among cases collected and analyzed by race/ethnicity by number:
    • Total:  249 deaths among cases with race and ethnicity data
    • American Indian or Alaskan Natives (non-Hispanic): 2 deaths, 0.80% 
    • Asian (non-Hispanic): 7 deaths, 2.81% 
    • Black or African American (non-Hispanic): 17 deaths, 6.83% 
    • Hispanic: 44 deaths, 17.67% 
    • Multiple racial categories (non-Hispanic): 3 deaths, 1.20% 
    • Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (non-Hispanic): 4 deaths, 1.61% 
    • Other: 0 deaths (no test performed as population data do not include ‘other’)
    • White (non-Hispanic): 172 deaths, 69.08% 

    Colorado has racial disparities in certain chronic diseases due to unequal access to health care and economic opportunities occurring over many generations. Because studies have shown people with underlying health conditions are more likely to die of the virus, tracking racial and ethnic data is a high priority for the department. 

    
“We know that social and health care inequities affect outcomes, and that becomes even more apparent in times of disaster,” said Jill Hunsaker-Ryan, Executive Director of CDPHE. “There have been generations of institutionalized barriers to things like preventive medical care, healthy food, safe and stable housing, quality education, reliable transportation, and clean air. Research shows that these types of factors are the most predictive of health outcomes. There is much to be learned from this disaster, and the uneven effects of COVID-19 on different communities will perhaps be one of the most profound lessons. It’s apparent now more than ever why we must bridge these inequities and even more closely track the outcomes of COVID-19 by race and ethnicity." 

    CDPHE is working continuously on data analysis and will update case data by race/ethnicity and other factors as it is available. Starting tomorrow, CDPHE will add race and ethnicity data to its daily refresh of data.

    *Unless otherwise indicated, the percentage listed is not statistically different from the general population distribution.

  •  

    04/09: Grants for college students

    Secretary DeVos Rapidly Delivers More Than $6 Billion in Emergency Cash Grants for College Students Impacted by Coronavirus Outbreak

    First wave of CARES Act funding will provide aid to students for expenses like course materials, technology, housing, food, health care, and childcare

    WASHINGTON — U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced today more than $6 billion will be distributed immediately to colleges and universities to provide direct emergency cash grants to college students whose lives and educations have been disrupted by the coronavirus outbreak. The funding is available through the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund authorized by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, signed into law by President Donald J. Trump less than two weeks ago.

    “What’s best for students is at the center of every decision we make,” said Secretary DeVos. “That’s why we prioritized getting funding out the door quickly to college students who need it most. We don’t want unmet financial needs due to the coronavirus to derail their learning.”

    The CARES Act provides nearly $14 billion to support postsecondary education students and institutions. Colleges and universities are required to utilize the $6.28 billion made available today to provide cash grants to students for expenses related to disruptions to their educations due to the COVID-19 outbreak, including things like course materials and technology as well as food, housing, health care, and childcare. In order to access the funds, the Department must receive a signed certification from the higher education institution affirming they will distribute the funds in accordance with applicable law. The college or university will then determine which students will receive the cash grants.

    School allocations are set by formula prescribed in the CARES Act that is weighted significantly by the number of full-time students who are Pell-eligible but also takes into consideration the total population of the school and the number of students who were not enrolled full-time online before the coronavirus outbreak. The Department is utilizing the most recent data available from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) and Federal Student Aid (FSA) for this calculation.

    Institutions will receive allocations and guidance for the institutional share of the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund in the coming weeks. Institutions will be able to use these funds to cover costs associated with significant changes to the delivery of instruction due to the coronavirus.

    Additional information on institution-level funding for students, including data tables, can be found here. The Secretary’s letter to college and university presidents with additional information on this funding allocation can be found here.

    The funding allocations announced today are part of the nearly $31 billion Congress allocated to the Department to distribute to students, K-12 schools, and higher education institutions under the CARES Act. The Department, at the Secretary’s urging, is working to make funds available as quickly as possible.

    Under the Secretary’s leadership, the Department has taken quick action to support higher education students from the start of the coronavirus outbreak. Colleges and universities were given immediate regulatory flexibility so students’ educations could continue online. The Secretary also provided student loan relief to tens of millions of borrowers by setting all federally held student loan interest rates to zero percent and allowing borrowers to defer payments for 60 days without interest. The CARES Act extends those benefits to six months. The Department also stopped all federal wage garnishments and collections actions for borrowers with federally held loans in default.

    The Department continues to update ed.gov/coronavirus with information for students, parents, educators and local leaders about how to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

    For more information about COVID-19, please visit the following websites: coronavirus.gov, cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html, and usa.gov/coronavirus.

  •  

    04/03: Distributing Critical Resources

    State health department distributes third allotment from Strategic National Stockpile

    DENVER, April 3, 2020: The Colorado State Emergency Operations Center (EOC) and Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) are distributing critical resources to help communities respond to COVID-19. This week, Colorado received a third allotment from the Strategic National Stockpile, which is being distributed across the state.  

    The Strategic National Stockpile is “the nation’s largest supply of potentially life-saving pharmaceuticals and medical supplies for use in a public health emergency severe enough to cause local supplies to run out.” This week Colorado received its third allotment, which included:

    • 122,490 N95 masks
    • 287,022 surgical masks
    • 56,160 face shields
    • 57,300 surgical gowns
    • 392,000 gloves
    • 3,636 coveralls

    Colorado has received a total of the following materials from all three allotments:

    • 220,010 N95 masks
    • 517,000 surgical masks
    • 100,232 face shields
    • 100,140 surgical gowns
    • 504,000 gloves
    • 3,816 coveralls

    Information about the first allotment can be found here and the second allotment can be found here.

    The State Unified Command Group, which is part of the State EOC, will distribute these materials to every county health department and tribe throughout the state where they are needed most. The following factors were used to determine allocation:

    • county population
    • portion of the population that is older than age 65 proportional to the state population
    • the number of nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and hospitals
    • if the county or tribe has received supplies previously

    All counties health departments and tribes in the state will receive supplies. CDPHE will work with regional staff to coordinate deliveries.

    There are many ways people can contribute to these efforts:

    • The EOC is coordinating requests for supplies, donations of supplies, vendors who can provide supplies, and trained medical personnel. Please follow the three steps on the Colorado Business EOC website [colorado.gov/cobeoc/business-members-and-vendors] to create an account in the state resource database. The State EOC uses this database to fill all resource requests from state and local agencies during emergencies.
    • Coloradans who wish to donate or volunteer to help those affected by COVID-19 should visit www.helpcoloradonow.com.
    • There is an urgent need for blood. Go to vitalent.org to sign up to donate blood.

    Personal protective equipment (PPE) is meant for single-use and is recommended by the CDC to be used for COVID-19 testing. In order to preserve these important resources for critical health care needs, CDPHE is urging the public to not wait for a test to self-isolate. People who are not at high risk of severe illness may not need to be evaluated in person or tested for COVID-19. Not everyone with symptoms will be tested right away. Call your health care provider only if your illness becomes more severe, especially if you are experiencing shortness of breath. 

    If you have any symptoms -- even mild ones -- public health urges you to stay home and isolate yourself until: 

    • You have had no fever for at least 72 hours (without the use of medicine) AND
    • Other symptoms (cough, shortness of breath) have improved AND
    • At least 7 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared.
    • Anyone in your household you have had close contact with (within six feet for approximately 10 minutes) should self-quarantine for 14 days, even if you haven’t been tested for COVID-19.
    • If you have a medical emergency, call 911. If you have severe respiratory symptoms, especially shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, tell the 911 dispatcher about your symptoms. Do not wait for a COVID-19 test to call 911.

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

  •  

    03/30: Testing Strategy

    State health department provides update on statewide COVID-19 testing strategy 

    DENVER, March 30, 2020: Testing for COVID-19 continues to be a top priority for the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE). The Colorado Unified Coordination Group (UCG)  is currently supporting strategic, targeted community testing for health care workers and first responders, and are working to increase the state’s testing capabilities.

    There are two primary routes to testing in Colorado today:

    1. Hospital staff, hospitalized patients, and vulnerable, symptomatic patients receiving care at health care facilities can get tested at those facilities.
    2. Critical health care workers and first responders who have symptoms can get tested at community testing sites being run by local public health agencies in various communities.

    “Right now, due to limited supplies of testing kits and personal protective equipment, testing needs to be focused on the people who are the most at-risk from this disease and the people in charge of caring for and keeping the rest of us safe. It’s important to protect the most critical element of the health care system. We are working hard to get the supplies and capacity to move to broader public testing, but until then our message remains the same: if you have only mild symptoms, self-isolate and don’t wait for a test,” said Scott Bookman, CDPHE COVID-19 Incident Commander. 

    The state has distributed 4200 testing kits and PPE to local public health agencies in El Paso, Larimer and Mesa Counties. The counties will use these supplies to test healthcare workers and first responders across their regions. The CDPHE lab also sent 300 testing kits to the Ute Mountain Ute tribe. More testing kits will be provided to local public health agencies once those supplies are received from FEMA.

    Meanwhile, the UCG  is working to develop plans that local public health agencies can use to conduct their own community testing sites when testing kits are more readily available. 

    Personal protective equipment (PPE) is meant for single-use and is recommended by the CDC to be used for COVID-19 testing. In order to preserve these important resources for critical health care needs, CDPHE has recommended that health care providers prioritize testing according to these tiers: 

    TIER 1 

    • Hospitalized patients
    • Health care workers with symptoms

    TIER 2

    • Patients in long-term care facilities or other residential settings such as homeless shelters or correctional facilities with symptoms
    • Patients over age 65 with symptoms
    • Patients with underlying conditions with symptoms*
    • First responders with symptoms
    • Critical infrastructure workers with symptoms**
    • People with symptoms who work with vulnerable populations or in group residential settings

    TIER 3

    • Other individuals with symptoms

    CDPHE is urging the public to not wait for a test to self-isolate. People who are not at high risk of severe illness may not need to be evaluated in person or tested for COVID-19. Not everyone with symptoms will be tested right away.

    Call your healthcare provider if your illness becomes more severe, especially if you are experiencing shortness of breath. You can use telehealth or a nurseline to get medical guidance; find out more and access a  list of telehealth and nurseline resources here:
    https://covid19.colorado.gov/telehealth-and-nurselines

    If you have any symptoms -- even mild ones -- public health urges you to stay home and isolate yourself until: 

    • You have had no fever for at least 72 hours (without the use of medicine) AND
    • Other symptoms (cough, shortness of breath) have improved AND
    • At least 7 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared.
    • Anyone in your household you have had close contact with (within six feet for approximately 10 minutes) should self-quarantine for 14 days, even if you haven’t been tested for COVID-19.
    • If you have a medical emergency, call 911. If you have severe respiratory symptoms, especially shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, tell the 911 dispatcher about your symptoms. Do not wait for a COVID-19.
  •  

    03/30: Survey on Attitudes

    tate health department releases survey results showing attitudes about COVID-19 

    DENVER, March 27, 2020:  The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) released results from a survey asking Coloradans about their perceptions and attitudes related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Nearly 45,000 Coloradans completed the survey between March 22 and March 24, 2020. 

    Highlights of the survey include:

    • 72% of respondents are “very concerned” about COVID-19 in Colorado.
    • Among 18-29-year-old respondents, 59% are “very concerned” about COVID-19 in Colorado.
    • Nearly 90% of respondents think it’s somewhat or very likely that they would get sick from the novel coronavirus.
    • Half (50%) of the respondents have a combination of symptoms indicative of generalized anxiety over the last two weeks.
    • A large majority of the respondents are taking extra precautions around COVID-19 to keep the community healthy:
      • 97% are washing their hands with soap and water more frequently.
      • 96% are avoiding large gatherings.
      • 70% are working from home.
      • 35% are stockpiling food and other household items.
    • Three in four respondents would try to get tested if they were exposed or had symptoms. The most common reason respondents selected would be to help the public health system build a better picture of how the virus is spreading.
    • Of those who would not get tested:
      • Three in four respondents said they would isolate themselves from others regardless.
      • More than 50% of respondents would not get tested because they are not sure if they meet the criteria for testing.
      • 3% think the virus isn’t that serious.
    • 40% of part-time, full-time, or self-employed respondents do not have access to paid leave if they were not able to work because of illness.
    • 43% of respondents are now working from home in response to the COVID-19. (Note: This survey was conducted prior to the state-wide stay-at-home order.)
    • 11% of respondents have had their hours reduced, 9% have temporarily lost their jobs and 1% have permanently lost their jobs due to COVID-19.

    “This survey shows what we already knew, that Coloradans are strong, and we are all in this together,” said Jill Hunsaker Ryan, executive director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. “We’re relieved to see that so many people are doing their part to slow the spread of this deadly virus. If we keep this up, we will protect our health care system from being overloaded with critical cases and countless lives will be saved.”

    This survey was fielded among a sample of Coloradans who accessed the survey by going to the CDPHE website. This sample may have been more concerned about COVID-19 and may have been more likely to have made behavior changes. The link to the survey was shared widely after release, so that bias may have been reduced. Although people of all racial and ethnic groups took the survey, Hispanic and Black or African American participants are underrepresented.

    The complete dashboard is available here and also at covid19.colorado.gov/about-covid-19.

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

  •  

    03/26: Dialing 2-1-1

    State of Colorado Activates 2-1-1 Colorado to Connect Coloradans with Human Services Resources During COVID-19 Pandemic 

    CENTENNIAL (March 26): Today, in partnership with Mile High United Way, the Colorado State Emergency Operations Center activated 2-1-1 Colorado to connect Coloradans with human service resources statewide. Coloradans can reach 2-1-1 Colorado online at 211Colorado.org, by dialing 2-1-1 or texting your Zip Code to 898-211. Do not call 911 for COVID-19 questions unless it is a medical emergency. 

    2-1-1 Colorado is a confidential and multilingual service connecting people across the State of Colorado to vital resources in their local community. 2-1-1 serves as one central location where people can access over 7,500 health and human service resources. 

    Callers may experience long wait times, as demand for information is high. 2-1-1 Colorado is hiring in order to reduce wait times and meet Coloradans’ needs. Coloradans can also reach 2-1-1 Colorado online at 211Colorado.org.

    2-1-1 provides navigation services to resources such as:  

    • Housing, including shelters and transitional services.
    • Rent and utility assistance.
    • Applying for SNAP benefits by phone.
    • Childcare.
    • Food/meals.
    • Transportation.
    • Clothing/personal/household needs.
    • Mental health and substance use disorders. 
    • Employment.
    • Education.
    • Medical clinics.
    • Dental clinic.
    • Other government/economic services. 

    2-1-1 will work in conjunction with The Colorado Health Emergency Line for the Public (CO HELP), a toll-free hotline for the latest public health information. If Coloradans are looking for general information about COVID-19, such as the number of cases in Colorado, the list of symptoms, or how you can protect yourself, they can call CO HELP by dialing 303-389-1687 or 1-877-462-2911.  

    "2-1-1 Colorado provides an invaluable service to thousands of individuals and families across Colorado. 2-1-1 is committed to meeting the growing needs of our community members impacted by the outbreak, and we are expanding our capacity to reach more people in need of support. We encourage all of our neighbors in need of immediate resources to connect with 2-1-1 Colorado to get help. We are grateful to the State of Colorado for their support and all the volunteers and donors who are supporting us to be able to answer the call,” said Christine Benero, President and CEO, Mile High United Way. 

    2-1-1 Resource Navigators are available to help by phone, Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. and have access to a language translation service to accommodate over 170 languages. Coloradans can also reach 2-1-1 toll-free by dialing 866-760-6489. 

    2-1-1 and CO HELP cannot offer medical advice or assistance. If you are having a medical emergency, call 911.

     

  •  

    03/25: Strategic National Stockpile

    State health department to distribute resources from Strategic National Stockpile

    DENVER, March 25, 2020: The Colorado State Emergency Operations Center (EOC) and Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) are distributing critical resources today to help communities respond to COVID-19. 

    This week, Colorado received a second allotment from the Strategic National Stockpile, which it will begin distributing across the state today.  

    The Strategic National Stockpile is “the nation’s largest supply of potentially life-saving pharmaceuticals and medical supplies for use in a public health emergency severe enough to cause local supplies to run out.” This week Colorado received its second allotment, which included:

    • 49,920 N95 masks
    • 117,500 surgical masks
    • 21,312 face shields
    • 20,820 surgical gowns
    • 108,000 gloves

    CDPHE estimates that these supplies are sufficient for approximately one full day of statewide operations under normal standards of care. Information about the first allotment can be found here

    The State Unified Command Group, which is part of the State EOC, will distribute these materials to every county health department and tribe throughout the state where they are needed most. The following factors were used to determine allocation:

    • County population.
    • Portion of the population that is older than age 65 proportional to the state population.
    • The number of nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and hospitals.
    • If the county or tribe has received supplies previously.

    All county health departments and tribes in the state will receive supplies. CDPHE will work with regional staff to coordinate deliveries.

    “Because of the finite amount of supplies, we, and numerous other states across the country, are not receiving the amounts we are requesting. However, the State of Colorado is not waiting to resolve this issue; we are working with the private sector and the public to find ways to increase our inventory of critical medical equipment and supplies,” said Mike Willis, Director of the State EOC.

    There are many ways people can contribute to these efforts:

    • The EOC is coordinating requests for supplies, donations of supplies, vendors who can provide supplies, and trained medical personnel. Please follow the three steps on the Colorado Business EOC website [colorado.gov/cobeoc/business-members-and-vendors] to create an account in the state resource database. The State EOC uses this database to fill all resource requests from state and local agencies during emergencies.
    • Coloradans who wish to donate or volunteer to help those affected by COVID-19 should visit www.helpcoloradonow.com.
    • There is an urgent need for blood. Go to vitalent.org to sign up to donate blood.

    Personal protective equipment (PPE) is meant for single-use and is recommended by the CDC to be used for COVID-19 testing. In order to preserve these important resources for critical health care needs, CDPHE is urging the public to not wait for a test to self-isolate. People who are not at high risk of severe illness may not need to be evaluated in person or tested for COVID-19. Not everyone with symptoms will be tested right away. Call your healthcare provider only if your illness becomes more severe, especially if you are experiencing shortness of breath. 

    If you have any symptoms-- even mild ones-- public health urges you to stay home and isolate yourself until: 

    • You have had no fever for at least 72 hours (without the use of medicine) AND
    • Other symptoms (cough, shortness of breath) have improved AND
    • At least 7 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared.
    • Anyone in your household you have had close contact with (within six feet for approximately 10 minutes) should self-quarantine for 14 days, even if you haven’t been tested for COVID-19.
    • If you have a medical emergency, call 911. If you have severe respiratory symptoms, especially shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, tell the 911 dispatcher about your symptoms. Do not wait for a COVID-19 test to call 911.

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

  •  

    03/20: Testing Resources

    State health department sending testing resources to communities throughout Colorado

    Drive-through testing site will be open in Salida on Saturday 

    DENVER, March 20, 2020: The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) is sending testing resources to specific communities that have not yet had testing that will yield vital information about how the disease is spreading. CDPHE is also strongly advising the public: If you have symptoms (fever, cough, and shortness of breath), don’t wait for a test to self-isolate.

    The State is expanding testing to include a temporary drive-through site at the Chaffee County Fairgrounds at 10165 County Road 120, Salida, CO on Saturday, March 21. The Colorado National Guard and Chaffee County Public Health are supporting these efforts. Chaffee County residents who are symptomatic and have a doctor’s order can show up between noon and 4 p.m. for the test. 

    People who come to be tested should know and do the following: 

    • Testing is free. Proof of insurance is not required. 
    • Bring a written or electronic copy of the doctor’s order. Individuals should not go to their doctor’s office but should call to get an emailed or faxed copy of the order. Bring a form of photo ID (driver’s
    • license, school ID, work badge, etc.) that matches the name on the doctor’s order. 
    • If there are multiple people in one vehicle, each person to be tested must have their own doctor’s order.
    • The first 100 people 
    • in the queue will have access to the drive-up testing; all other vehicles that arrive after that will be encouraged to seek testing from a private provider. Always call ahead and speak with the health
    • care facility in advance before going there for testing or treatment.
    • Individuals will drive through a secured area and will remain in their vehicles throughout the entire testing process. 
    • Be prepared for long wait times. No restrooms will be available.
    • Bring water and other items to be comfortable while waiting. 
    • Telephonic interpretation will be available for speakers of other languages. 

    CDPHE also plans to send testing resources to other locations next week. CDPHE is prioritizing testing in areas that have not been highly tested to better understand where the disease is occurring and respond. These sites will serve high-risk patients who have been pre-selected by area health care providers. They will not accept walk-up or drive-up patients.  

    The state health department is also strongly advising that if you have mild symptoms, stay home and avoid contact with others. Call your health care provider only if your illness becomes more severe, especially if you are experiencing shortness of breath. If you have a medical emergency, call 911 and tell the dispatcher your symptoms. People who are not at high risk of severe illness may not need to be evaluated in person or tested for COVID-19. Not everyone with symptoms will be tested right away. 

    If you have mild symptoms, suspect you were exposed, and are either unable to get tested or waiting on test results:

    • Please stay home and isolate yourself until:
      • You have had no fever for at least 72 hours (without the use of medicine)
      • AND
      • Other symptoms (cough, shortness of breath) have improved
      • AND
      • At least 7 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared.
    • Anyone in your household you have had close contact with (within six feet for approximately 10 minutes) should
    • self-quarantine
    • for 14 days, even if you haven’t been tested for COVID-19.

     

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

  •  

    03/16: Parents and Guardians

    State health department provides recommendations for parents and guardians

    DENVER, March 16, 2020: The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has recommendations for parents and guardians with children at home from school.

    Closing schools is a powerful way to slow the spread of COVID-19 and protect people at higher risk from getting very sick or dying. Though kids are thought to be at lower risk for severe disease from COVID-19, they can easily spread it to others.

    “We are all in this together. Nearly every child could have an  interaction with an older adult or others at risk of getting severe illness from  COVID-19. This is not just about keeping kids safe, which is absolutely important; it’s about keeping the whole community safe by limiting and slowing the spread,” said Dr. Rachel Herlihy, state epidemiologist, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

    When school is closed, kids and adults should practice social distancing. Aim to stay 6 feet away from others as much as possible. Do not take children into any social setting when they are sick. 

    The complete set of recommendations is available on the website.

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting colorado.gov/cdphe/2019-novel-coronavirus.

  •  

    03/15: Colorado Cases

    CDPHE confirms 24 additional new presumptive positive cases in Colorado

    DENVER, March 14, 2020: The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) confirmed 24 new presumptive positive cases in Colorado, based on overnight test results. That brings the total number of presumptive positive cases to date to 101.

    The test results include 20 from the state lab and 4 from private testing facilities that are receiving samples from health care providers. The state can confirm completed test results on approximately 800 people in Colorado since testing started on February 28.

    Because of the large number of new cases, CDPHE is shifting to report aggregate data for new cases, instead of listing details on each specific case. Additionally, the release of these updated numbers of cases will be released once per day, at approximately noon.

    Total new presumptive positive cases: 24

    Age of individuals:
    • 20s – 4
    • 30s – 5
    • 40s – 5
    • 50s – 5
    • 60s – 2
    • 70s – 2
    • 80s – 1
    County of residence:
    • Adams - 3
    • Arapahoe – 3
    • Denver – 5
    • Eagle – 4
    • El Paso – 1
    • Gunnison - 2
    • Jefferson – 2
    • Mesa - 1
    • Pitkin – 1
    • Weld - 1
    • Out of state - 1 (Currently located Denver County)

    Resident/Visitor:
    • Residents: 23
    • Visitors: 1
    Gender:
    • Female: 11
    • Male: 13
    To ensure expedience on reporting presumptive positive cases, the state will provide overall testing statistics as soon as we are able on the website.

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting our website.
  •  

    03/13: Drive-up Testing Site

    Lab to implement changes to drive-up

    CDPHE drive-up COVID-19 testing site in Lowry tested more than 650 Coloradans in 2 days

    *We ask members of the media to help us disseminate this information as soon as possible 

    DENVER, March 12, 2020: The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment's (CDPHE) drive-up COVID-19 testing site in Lowry has collected tests for more than 650 Coloradans since Tuesday, March 11. The results of these test results will give the state much needed epidemiological intelligence that is critical for policy decisions.

    Due to the overwhelming response in the first two days, we will be operating with limited capacity on Friday, March 13. This will ensure the safety of our lab and health care workers and minimize unnecessary wait times. Because Colorado now has capacity for private labs to conduct testing, CDPHE encourages anyone who is symptomatic or who believes they may have been exposed to COVID-19 to call or email your physician first for guidance, obtain a doctor’s order for testing, and request information about private providers where you can get tested. Always call first before reporting to a health care facility for testing.

    Any medical provider with a relationship with Labcorp or Qwest can send out the test, but be sure to contact your provider ahead of time because many providers have centralized sites for collection due to safety precautions.

    CDPHE has determined that traffic patterns, on-site staffing, and lab testing capabilities can handle a maximum of 100-150 vehicles in the drive-up queue. 

    • Testing at the drive-up site will take place from noon-2 p.m. on Friday, March 13.
    • The first 100-150 vehicles in the queue will have access to the drive-up testing; all other vehicles that arrive after that will be encouraged to seek testing from a private provider. Always call ahead and speak with the health care facility in advance before going there for testing or treatment.
    • If you have a medical emergency, call 911- do not report to the testing site, as it is not a diagnostic facility not a care facility. If you have severe respiratory symptoms, especially shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, tell the dispatcher about your symptoms. Do not wait for a COVID-19 test to call 911.
    • If you are ill or suspect that you were exposed, but are not able to be immediately tested, please stay home, self-isolate, and contact your physician. 
    • For the safety of drive-up lab workers, hours of operation will be contingent upon safe weather. We will announce if we need to close the site due to unsafe conditions.
    • Unsafe conditions include any weather that can make personal protection equipment ineffective, such as any precipitation, wind, or colder temperatures. 
    • While waiting for their test results, individuals should stay at home. Those who receive positive test results may be issued isolation orders. Depending on test volume, we aim to contact individuals directly with their results within 72 hours.

    Gov. Polis has deployed the Colorado National Guard to help manage logistics, traffic, and other assistance with capacity for the site.

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting colorado.gov/cdphe/2019-novel-coronavirus.

Pueblo Department of Publich Health and Environment

  •  

    07/15: Possible Community Exposure to COVID-19 at Desert Hawk Golf Course

    The Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment is notifying golfers, patrons and employees of the Desert Hawk Golf Course of a possible exposure to COVID-19. The exposure time frame is from June 29 to July 3, 2020.

    “This is a public notice contacting anyone who was at Desert Hawk Golf Course June 29- July 3,” said Randy Evetts, director of the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment. “Anyone who was at Desert Hawk Golf Course during this time should monitor themselves for symptoms of COVID-19 for at least 14 days after being at Desert Hawk Golf Course.”

    Two Desert Hawk Golf Course employees tested positive for COVID-19 over a 14-day period which according to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, is an outbreak.

    Individuals who were at Desert Hawk Golf Course during this time should get tested. If you are showing any symptoms, even mild, remain at home, contact their health care provider, and get tested. Free testing is available at the Colorado State Fairgrounds Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday 9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.

    “We strongly recommend the community continue to abide by Governor Polis’ Safer at Home and in the Vast Great Outdoors order, wash your hands frequently, wear a cloth mask that covers your mouth and nose when out in public, practice social distancing and frequently clean all common surfaces,” Evetts said.

    Public health officials recommend employees, golfers, and patrons keep in mind the following tips to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 in public places:

    • If you have symptoms of COVID-19 you should notify your employer, stay at home, and contact your health care provider. Symptoms are fever or chills, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting and diarrhea. This list does not include all possible symptoms. Visit cdc.gov for the list of symptoms as it continues to be updated with more information learned about COVID-19. 
    • If you have symptoms of COVID-19 do not return to work until your symptoms have subsided and isolation timelines have been met (14 days since being at the golf course during the time period of June 29 to July 3, 2020).
    • If you have no symptoms but have a family member at home who tested positive for COVID-19 or have a family member with COVID-19 symptoms, they should notify their employer and public health to determine quarantine precautions.
    • If you are showing any COVID-19 symptoms when you arrive to work for the day, employees should immediately separate from other employees, report to your supervisory, return home, contact your health care provider and get tested.

    Pueblo County has had seven outbreaks, four are resolved and three are active. CDPHE’s report of outbreaks at facilities statewide is updated weekly on Wednesdays at https://covid19.colorado.gov/data/outbreak-data

    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the most vulnerable in Pueblo by:

    • Follow Governor's Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors order
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities.
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Seek preventative and routine care through your primary care provider and use the emergency room when medically necessary.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.
    • Stay home when you’re sick.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:

  •  

    07/10: Enforcing State Public Health Orders

    July 10, 2020 Pueblo, CO -Pueblo County and the City of Pueblo are working collaboratively with the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment to enforce the state mandated Public Health Orders.

    “We have a number of businesses who are investing money, time and resources to ensure they are complying with the public health orders but there are still a few businesses who choose to ignore these orders,” said Randy Evetts, public health director for the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment.

    Evetts said in an effort to protect the health of the community and even the playing field for all businesses, the health department will continue to investigate all reports of violations of the public health orders. The goal is voluntary compliance. However, businesses who continue to ignore the orders will be issued a notice of violation and can face a court appearance and/or a fine.

    “Specifically we receive a number of complaints daily regarding employees not wearing masks as required, lack of attention to capacity limits, and other violations of the Public Health Orders. These orders are state mandates not just guidelines,” said Evetts. “First we try to educate our businesses about the orders and provide technical assistance to help them comply. When that is not successful and we continue to receive complaints, our team of inspectors will investigate and if necessary issue a notice of violation. If the violations are not corrected, then tickets will be issued and civil or criminal actions may be taken.”

    Public health officials along with local law enforcement and the 10th Judicial District Attorney’s Office continue to work collaboratively to ensure the health and safety of the community by supporting the enforcement of the public health orders.

    “All of our agencies have worked to educate the public on the dangers of the coronavirus and the community has largely cooperated with our efforts,” said District Attorney Jeff Chostner. “To the extent that some individuals or businesses have not complied with the Governor’s health directives, all of us will use the authority that has been granted us by the Legislature to apply the necessary sanctions for the health and benefit of county residents. In some cases that might mean civil action, in others criminal. All will depend on the facts of each situation, but enforcement will be applied as necessary to effect public health for our community.”

    Mayor Nick Gradisar said he strongly supports enforcement efforts and added the City of Pueblo will be hiring 10 COVID-19 Education and Enforcement technicians to ensure local businesses are aware of the requirements of the Pueblo County variance. The variance Pueblo County received allows for fewer restrictions in indoor and outdoor spaces as compared to the state’s public health order.

    “Our goal is to first educate the business community and secondly, to enforce those requirements,” Gradisar said. “A business that fails to follow the rules will jeopardize their license to do business in the City of Pueblo, or their liquor license if they have one.”

    Gradisar added “We want to have a thriving economy in Pueblo, even during this pandemic, but that can only happen if everyone is careful and follows the rules. I want our establishments to know that someone is watching and that we will respond to complaints in a timely manner.” 

    Per the state public health order, all employees are required to wear a mask when working and it is highly recommended the public to wear masks when away from home, including when going into businesses, to help reduce the spread of the virus.

    “The more precautions the general public takes, the greater chance we have of opening more businesses and keeping them open,” said Pueblo County Commissioner Garrison Ortiz.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends wearing a cloth face mask especially in indoor public settings and businesses where people are in close contact and proper social distancing cannot always be maintained. The virus is primarily spread through droplets. Wearing a facial covering keeps the droplets that may contain the virus from spreading. Wearing a cloth face covering will help protect people around you, including those at higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19 and workers who frequently come into the close contact with other people.

  •  

    07/09: Pueblo Approved Variance table

  •  

    07/08: Pueblo Updates

    Mask Up Pueblo Campaign Kicks Off
    The Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment has launched a new social media campaign designed to highlight why community leaders and the general public are wearing a mask. All individuals wearing a mask are encouraged to share of picture of themselves with their mask and a short message about why they are wearing a mask. The photos will be featured on the PDPHE Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages. Don’t forget to use the hashtag #MaskUpPueblo. View the first post on Facebook here. Submit photos and captions to sarah.joseph@pueblocounty.us.

    Pueblo County’s Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site
    Pueblo County’s free COVID-19 drive-thru testing at the Colorado State Fairgrounds continues every Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday beginning at 9 a.m. There is no limit to the number of people who can be tested per day.

    Currently, the following individuals can be tested for COVID-19 at Pueblo’s COVID-19 Drive-Thru Testing:

    • Any individual who is symptomatic (symptoms include body aches, loss of sense of taste or smell, cough, difficulty breathing, fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain
    • Anyone over the age of 65 (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • African American, Latino, American Indian Tribes (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • Anyone who had contact with a person who has tested positive for COVID-19
    • Health care workers and first responders (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • A resident of a long-term care facility or anyone experiencing homelessness
    • Attended a large gathering or protest

    The testing site at the Colorado State Fairgrounds (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue) is drive-thru only and individuals must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves, children and individuals unable to give the test to themselves will be turned away. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    View a short video of the COVID-19 Self-Swabbing Test https://youtu.be/vsQVxsQY3jc

    State Health Department Releases Information on Protect-Our-Neighbors Certification
    The Colorado Department of Health and Environment released a guide and application form that allows local communities to apply for Protect-Our-Neighbors certification if they meet certain criteria. Criteria that must be met includes low viral transmission levels, local public health agency capacity for testing, case investigation, contact tracing and outbreak response and hospital ability to meet the needs of all patients and to handle the surge in demand for intensive care. The guide to apply for Protect-Our-Neighbor can be found here.  Communities that cannot meet certification for criteria for Protect-Our-Neighbor can apply for variances for Safer-at-Home.

    Pueblo’s COVID-19 Updates to be Released One Time per Week
    As a coordinated response to the COVID-19 public health emergency, the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment will provide updates from a variety of local agencies responding to this health emergency and COVID-19 case updates. Local updates will only go out at 4 p.m. Wednesdays.

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 case updated will be Monday through Friday at 4 p.m. on the following websites, puebloemergency.info and pueblohealth.org.

    Pueblo’s COVID-19 Case Updates
    Health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced today two Pueblo County residents have died related to COVID-19. A 99-year-old female and a 67-year-old male, who both previously were reported positive, died. The reported deaths bring the total in Pueblo County to 31.

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced 25 new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County since Thursday, July 2. The positives cases are a 11-year-old female, 25-year-old female, 26-year-old female, 27-year-old female, 28-year-old female, 44-year-old female, 47-year-old female, 51-year-old female, 62-year-old female, 71-year-old female, 21-year-old male, 22-year-old male, 22-year-old male, 26-year-old, 30-year-old male, 30-year-old male, 32-year-old male, 45-year-old male, 46-year-old male, 49-year-old male, 50-year-old male, 54-year-old male, 58-year-old male, 77-year-old and an 83-year-old male. Pueblo County has a total of 416 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. The total number of people testing, 9,215 is not reflective of everyone testing negative in Pueblo County.

    Confirmed and probable cases have been combined to align with state and national data. However, the COVID-19 Status Update chart will continue to show probable cases.

    As cases continue to be investigated, the data in this update is subject to change.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Confirmed and Probable COVID-19 Case in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age       Cases
    Group

    0-9        6
    10-19   16
    20-29   73       
    30-39   46       
    40-49   68
    50-59   65
    60-69   48
    70-79   40
    80+      54        

    Confirmed and Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female            245
    Male               167
    Unavailable    4                     

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Death by Age Group
    Age      Cases
    Group
    0-9       0

    10-19    0
    20-29    0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   3
    60-69   4        
    70-79    7        
    80+      17

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Deaths by Sex
    Female            11
    Male               19
    Unavailable    1

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to: 

    • Follow the Governor’s Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors order.
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities.
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher, chills, headache, sore throat and new loss of smell or taste, call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Seek preventative and routine care through your primary care provider and use the emergency room when medically necessary.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.
    • Stay home when you’re sick.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday (closed for government holidays) 719-583-4444.

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    07/01: Pueblo Updates

    Pueblo’s COVID-19 Updates to be Released One Time per Week
    As a coordinated response to the COVID-19 public health emergency, the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment will provide updates from a variety of local agencies responding to this health emergency and COVID-19 case updates. Beginning Wednesday, July 8, local updates will go out at 4 p.m. Wednesdays.

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 case updated will be Monday through Friday at 4 p.m. on the following websites, puebloemergency.info and pueblohealth.org.

    Bars Remain Open in Pueblo as a Result of Local Variance
    Bars in Pueblo remain open after Governor Polis announced a closure statewide in an effort to reduce mingling and the spread of COVID-19 resulting in increased cases. As Pueblo County’s variance was approved June 11, 2020 bars are one of the categories allowed to be open. Pueblo’s bars must serve the amount of food required by their liquor license (pretzels, frozen burritos, etc).
    Read Pueblo’s variance guidelines for bars here.

    Pueblo County’s Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Resumes July 6
    Pueblo County’s free COVID-19 drive-thru testing at the Colorado State Fairgrounds will be closed the rest of the week but will resume testing on July 6. Testing will continue through the end of the month every Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

    Currently, the following individuals can be tested for COVID-19 at Pueblo’s COVID-19 Drive-Thru Testing:

    • Any individual who is symptomatic (symptoms include body aches, loss of sense of taste or smell, cough, difficulty breathing, fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain
    • Anyone over the age of 65 (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • African American, Latino, American Indian Tribes (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • Anyone who had contact with a person who has tested positive for COVID-19
    • Health care workers and first responders (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • A resident of a long-term care facility or anyone experiencing homelessness
    • Attended a large gathering or protest

    The testing site at the Colorado State Fairgrounds (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue) is drive-thru only and individuals must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves, children and individuals unable to give the test to themselves will be turned away. The first 250 individuals each day able to self-administer the test will have access to drive-up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    View a video of the COVID-19 Self-Swabbing Test https://youtu.be/vsQVxsQY3jc

    Pueblo County EOC, COVID-19 Hotline Closed for Fourth of July Holiday
    The Pueblo County Emergency Operations Center and the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline will be closed Friday, July 3 in observance of the Fourth of July holiday. The daily update media briefing, which includes updates on Pueblo County’s COVID-19 cases, will not be distributed on Friday. The COVID-19 Hotline will re-open at 9 a.m. Monday, July 6. The hotline is available Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at (719) 583-4444.

    Pueblo’s COVID-19 Case Updates
    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced 6 new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County since Monday, June 29. The positives cases are a 23-year-old female, 44-year-old female, 53-year-old female, 22-year-old male, 27-year-old male, and an 85-year-old male, and an -year-old male. Pueblo County has a total of 392 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. The total number of people testing, 8,234 is not reflective of everyone testing negative in Pueblo County.

    Confirmed and probable cases have been combined to align with state and national data. However, the COVID-19 Status Update chart will continue to show probable cases.

    As cases continue to be investigated, the data in this update is subject to change.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Outbreak Updates
    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced a COVID-19 outbreak at Administrative Offices Pueblo Police Department. To date Administrative Offices Pueblo Police Department has had two employees test positive for COVID-19.

    According to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, an outbreak in a facility is defined as two or more confirmed cases of COVID-19 during a 14-day period.

    Pueblo County has had six outbreaks, three are resolved and three are active. CDPHE’s report of outbreaks at facilities statewide is updated weekly on Wednesdays at https://covid19.colorado.gov/data/outbreak-data.

    Confirmed and Probable COVID-19 Case in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age       Cases
    Group

    0-9        6
    10-19   15
    20-29   66       
    30-39   43       
    40-49   63
    50-59   61
    60-69   47
    70-79   38
    80+      53        

    Confirmed and Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female            235
    Male               153
    Unavailable    4                     

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Death by Age Group
    Age      Cases
    Group
    0-9       0

    10-19    0
    20-29    0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   3
    60-69   3        
    70-79    7        
    80+      16

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Deaths by Sex
    Female            10
    Male               18
    Unavailable    1         

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to: 

    • Follow the Governor’s Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors order.
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities.
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher, chills, headache, sore throat and new loss of smell or taste, call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Seek preventative and routine care through your primary care provider and use the emergency room when medically necessary.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.
    • Stay home when you’re sick.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday (closed for government holidays) 719-583-4444.

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    06/29: Pueblo Updates

    Pueblo County’s Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Open June 30; Testing Resumes July 6
    Pueblo County’s free COVID-19 drive-thru testing at the Colorado State Fairgrounds will be open only on Tuesday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The site will be closed the rest of the week but will resume testing on July 6. Testing will continue through the end of the month every Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

    Currently, the following individuals can be tested for COVID-19 at Pueblo’s COVID-19 Drive-Thru Testing:

    • Any individual who is symptomatic (symptoms include body aches, loss of sense of taste or smell, cough, difficulty breathing, fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain
    • Anyone over the age of 65 (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • African American, Latino, American Indian Tribes (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • Anyone who had contact with a person who has tested positive for COVID-19
    • Health care workers and first responders (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • A resident of a long-term care facility or anyone experiencing homelessness
    • Attended a large gathering or protest

    The testing site at the Colorado State Fairgrounds (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue) is drive-thru only and individuals must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves, children and individuals unable to give the test to themselves will be turned away. The first 250 individuals each day able to self-administer the test will have access to drive-up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    View a video of the COVID-19 Self-Swabbing Test https://youtu.be/vsQVxsQY3jc

    Pueblo County EOC, COVID-19 Hotline Closed for Fourth of July Holiday
    The Pueblo County Emergency Operations Center and the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline will be closed Friday, July 3 in observance of the Fourth of July holiday. The daily update media briefing, which includes updates on Pueblo County’s COVID-19 cases, will not be distributed on Friday. The COVID-19 Hotline will re-open at 9 a.m. Monday, July 6. The hotline is available Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at (719) 583-4444.

    State Health Department Releases Guidance Allowing Visitors at Residential Care Facilities
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment released guidance allowing outdoor visitation at residential care facilities. The guidance allows visitors at residential care facilities while minimizing the potential spread of COVID-19. Outdoor visitation will not be allowed if the facility has an outbreak or if the community is under a Stay-at-Home order. To view the guidance, click here. 

    CDC Launches Contact Tracing Website
    The Center for Disease Control and Prevention launched a new website providing information on contact tracing. The website provides information on what contact tracing is, what’s involved with contact tracing and its importance in preventing the spread of infectious disease. The website can be found at cdc.gov.

    Colorado’s Symptom Support Tool
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has revised the Colorado COVID Symptom Support Tool which allows individuals to share their COVID-19 symptoms and to help people get connected to resources to help them feel better. The support tool also provides a Frequently Asked Questions section and provides county-by-county data from those reporting their symptoms. The Symptom Support Tool is available on the COVID19.colorado.gov webpage.

    Pueblo’s COVID-19 Case Updates
    Health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced today that one Pueblo County resident has died related to COVID-19. A 93-year-old male, who was previously reported positive, died. The reported death brings the total in Pueblo County to 29.

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced eight new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County since Wednesday, June 24. The positives cases are a 40-year-old female, 52-year-old female, 67 -year-old female, 79-year-old female, 21-year-old male, 65-year-old male, 73-year-old male, and an 86-year-old male. Pueblo County has a total of 386 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. The total number of people testing, 7,705, is not reflective of everyone testing negative in Pueblo County.

    Confirmed and probable cases have been combined to align with state and national data. However, the COVID-19 Status Update chart will continue to show probable cases.

    As cases continue to be investigated, the data in this update is subject to change.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Confirmed and Probable COVID-19 Case in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age       Cases
    Group

    0-9        6
    10-19   15
    20-29   63       
    30-39   43       
    40-49   62
    50-59   60
    60-69   47
    70-79   38
    80+      52        

    Confirmed and Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female            232
    Male               150
    Unavailable    4                     

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Death by Age Group
    Age      Cases
    Group
    0-9       0

    10-19    0
    20-29    0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   3
    60-69   3        
    70-79    7        
    80+      16

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Deaths by Sex
    Female            10
    Male               18
    Unavailable    1         

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to: 

    • Follow the Governor’s Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors order.
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities.
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher, chills, headache, sore throat and new loss of smell or taste, call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Seek preventative and routine care through your primary care provider and use the emergency room when medically necessary.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.
    • Stay home when you’re sick.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday (closed for government holidays) 719-583-4444.

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    06/26: Pueblo Updates

    Possible Community Exposure to COVID-19 from Celebration of Life
    The Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment notified participants of the Mike Roumph Celebration of Life on Saturday, June 20, 2020 at the Thunderzone that an attendee tested positive for COVID-19. 

    Individuals who were at the Thunderzone for this event and are showing any symptoms of COVID-19 should remain at home and contact their health care provider. If you are having symptoms, do not go to work, stay home, isolate and get tested. If you need to go out, please wear a mask as you may spread the virus two days before you feel symptoms. For questions call the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline (719) 583-4444.

    Mayor Gradisar’s Message
    View a message from Pueblo Mayor Gradisar, here 
    https://youtu.be/oBvJ5lHpACk.

    Department of Justice Issues Alert of Fraudulent Facemask Flyers
    The Department of Justice has issued an alert regarding the distribution of postings and flyers regarding the Americans with Disabilities Act and the use of facemasks due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The flyers, some of which contain the Department of Justice seal, are fraudulent. The postings were not issued nor are endorsed by the Department of Justice. The public should not rely on the information contained in the posting but should visit the Americans With Disabilities Act website at ADA.gov for official information distributed by the Department of Justice.

    Pueblo County’s Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Open Only One Day Next Week; Testing Resumes July 6
    Pueblo County’s free COVID-19 drive-thru testing at the Colorado State Fairgrounds will be open only on Tuesday next week from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The site will be closed the rest of the week but will resume testing on July 6. Testing will continue through the end of the month every Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

    Currently, the following individuals can be tested for COVID-19 at Pueblo’s COVID-19 Drive-Thru Testing:

    • Any individual who is symptomatic (symptoms include body aches, loss of sense of taste or smell, cough, difficulty breathing, fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain
    • Anyone over the age of 65 (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • African American, Latino, American Indian Tribes (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • Anyone who had contact with a person who has tested positive for COVID-19
    • Health care workers and first responders (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • A resident of a long-term care facility or anyone experiencing homelessness
    • Attended a large gathering or protest

    The testing site at the Colorado State Fairgrounds (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue) is drive-thru only and individuals must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves, children and individuals unable to give the test to themselves will be turned away. The first 250 individuals each day able to self-administer the test will have access to drive-up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    View a video of the COVID-19 Self-Swabbing Test https://youtu.be/vsQVxsQY3jc

    Pueblo County EOC, COVID-19 Hotline Closed for Fourth of July Holiday
    The Pueblo County Emergency Operations Center and the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline will be closed Friday, July 3 in observance of the Fourth of July holiday. The daily update media briefing, which includes updates on Pueblo County’s COVID-19 cases, will not be distributed on Friday. The COVID-19 Hotline will re-open at 9 a.m. Monday, July 6. The hotline is available Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at (719) 583-4444.

    State Health Department Releases Guidance Allowing Visitors at Residential Care Facilities
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment released guidance allowing outdoor visitation at residential care facilities. The guidance allows visitors at residential care facilities while minimizing the potential spread of COVID-19. Outdoor visitation will not be allowed if the facility has an outbreak or if the community is under a Stay-at-Home order. To view the guidance, click here. 

    CDC Launches Contact Tracing Website
    The Center for Disease Control and Prevention launched a new website providing information on contact tracing. The website provides information on what contact tracing is, what’s involved with contact tracing and its importance in preventing the spread of infectious disease. The website can be found at cdc.gov.

    Colorado’s Symptom Support Tool
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has revised the Colorado COVID Symptom Support Tool which allows individuals to share their COVID-19 symptoms and to help people get connected to resources to help them feel better. The support tool also provides a Frequently Asked Questions section and provides county-by-county data from those reporting their symptoms. The Symptom Support Tool is available on the COVID19.colorado.gov webpage.

    Pueblo’s COVID-19 Case Updates
    Health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced today that one Pueblo County resident has died related to COVID-19. A 74-year-old female, who was previously reported positive, died. The reported death brings the total in Pueblo County to 28.

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced ten new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County since Wednesday, June 24. The positives cases are a 20-year-old female, 24-year-old female, 40-year-old female, 47-year-old female, 55-year-old female, 55-year-old female  26-year-old male, 33-year-old male, 66-year-old male, and a 21-year-old gender not known. Pueblo County has a total of 379 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. The total number of people testing, 7,639, is not reflective of everyone testing negative in Pueblo County.

    Confirmed and probable cases have been combined to align with state and national data. However, the COVID-19 Status Update chart will continue to show probable cases.

    As cases continue to be investigated, the data in this update is subject to change.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Confirmed and Probable COVID-19 Case in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age       Cases
    Group

    0-9        6
    10-19   15
    20-29   63       
    30-39   43       
    40-49   61
    50-59   59
    60-69   45
    70-79   36
    80+      51        

    Confirmed and Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female            228
    Male               146
    Unavailable    5                     

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Death by Age Group
    Age      Cases
    Group
    0-9       0

    10-19    0
    20-29    0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   3
    60-69   3        
    70-79    7        
    80+      15

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Deaths by Sex
    Female            10
    Male               17
    Unavailable    1         

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to: 

    • Follow the Governor’s Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors order.
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities.
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher, chills, headache, sore throat and new loss of smell or taste, call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Seek preventative and routine care through your primary care provider and use the emergency room when medically necessary.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.
    • Stay home when you’re sick.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday (closed for government holidays) 719-583-4444.

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    06/26: Community Testing to Continue Through July

    Pueblo, CO. – Free community COVID-19 testing at the Colorado State Fairgrounds will be held only one day next week before resuming the three-day a week schedule on July 6. In July, testing will be on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.

    Testing for the month of June will wrap up Tuesday with the site open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The test site will be closed for the remainder of the week before opening again on July 6. Testing will continue every Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday through the month of July. The test site is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Colorado State Fairgrounds (enter through Gate 4 at Mesa and Gaylord avenues).

    “We are pleased to continue to provide testing for our community,” said Randy Evetts, public health director for the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment.

    Testing is free and is limited to 250 people per day. Tests are available to anyone experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 to include fever (100.4 degrees or higher), shortness of breath, cough, headache, chills, body aches, muscle pain, sore throat, new loss of taste or smell, diarrhea, and vomiting. Tests are also available for the following individuals who are asymptomatic:

    • Healthcare workers and first responders
    • Anyone over the age of 65
    • Anyone who has had contact with a person testing positive for COVID-19
    • African American, Latino and American Indian Tribes
    • A resident of a long-term care facility and anyone experiencing homelessness
    • Attended a large gathering or protest

    All test at the Colorado State Fairgrounds are self-administered. Everyone, including kids 5-years old and younger must be able to do the test with no assistance. Everyone not able to do the test without assistance will be turned away

    The testing site is a drive-thru only and individuals must be inside an enclosed vehicle. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. No physician order is required and all testing is free.

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19 
    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to:   

    • Follow the Governor’s Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors order.  
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities.  
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.  
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher, chills, headache, sore throat and new loss of smell or taste, call your medical provider before visiting them.  
    • Seek preventative and routine care through your primary care provider and use the emergency room when medically necessary. 
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.  
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.  
    • Stay home when you’re sick.  
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.  
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.  
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.  

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:   

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information CenterPueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday (closed for government holidays) 719-583-4444 

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you. 

  •  

    06/25: Possible Community Exposure to COVID-19

    June 25, 2020 Pueblo, CO-The Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment is notifying participants of the Mike Roumph Celebration of Life on Saturday, June 20, 2020 at the Thunderzone that an attendee tested positive for COVID-19.

    “This is a public notice notifying anyone who was at the Mike Roumph Celebration of Life on Saturday, June 20 as an attendee tested positive for COVID-19,” said Randy Evetts, director of the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment. “Anyone who was at the Thunderzone June 20 should monitor themselves for symptoms of COVID-19 at least through July 4.”

    Individuals who were at the Thunderzone for this event and are showing any symptoms of COVID-19 should remain at home and contact their health care provider. If you are having symptoms, do not go to work, stay home, isolate and get tested.

    Anyone having symptoms, even if they are mild, should get tested for COVID-19. Testing is available at the Colorado State Fairgrounds Tuesday, June 30, 9:00 am - 3:00 pm. Testing will resume after the Fourth of July holiday beginning July 6 – July 31, every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday from 9:00 am-3:00 pm.

    It is important to note a negative test does not mean you cannot get sick afterwards, especially within 14 days after exposure. Continue to monitor for symptoms and immediately isolate at home if symptoms develop and get tested.

    “Community members are encouraged to wash your hands frequently, wear a cloth mask that covers your mouth and nose when out in public, and practice social distancing,” Evetts said.

    Public health officials recommend community members keep in mind the following to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 in public places:

    If you feel symptoms of COVID-19 (fever or chills, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, or diarrhea), notify your employer and stay at home.

    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to: 

    • Follow the Governor’s Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors order.
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities.
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher, chills, headache, sore throat and new loss of smell or taste, call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Seek preventative and routine care through your primary care provider and use the emergency room when medically necessary.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.
    • Stay home when you’re sick.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday (closed for government holidays) 719-583-4444.

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    06/24: Pueblo Updates

    Pueblo County’s Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Open through July at Colorado State Fairgrounds
    Pueblo County’s free COVID-19 drive-thru testing at the Colorado State Fairgrounds has been expanded through the end of July. Testing will be open Thursday (June 25) and Tuesday (June 30) before switching to a Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday schedule beginning July 6. The testing site is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

    Currently, the following individuals can be tested for COVID-19 at Pueblo’s COVID-19 Drive-Thru Testing:

    • Any individual who is symptomatic (symptoms include body aches, loss of sense of taste or smell, cough, difficulty breathing, fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain
    • Anyone over the age of 65 (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • African American, Latino, American Indian Tribes (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • Anyone who had contact with a person who has tested positive for COVID-19
    • Health care workers and first responders (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • A resident of a long-term care facility or anyone experiencing homelessness
    • Attended a large gathering or protest

    The testing site at the Colorado State Fairgrounds (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue) is drive-thru only and individuals must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive-up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    View a video of the COVID-19 Self-Swabbing Test https://youtu.be/vsQVxsQY3jc

    Colorado’s Symptom Support Tool
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has revised the Colorado COVID Symptom Support Tool which allows individuals to share their COVID-19 symptoms and to help people get connected to resources to help them feel better. The support tool also provides a Frequently Asked Questions section and provides county-by-county data from those reporting their symptoms. The Symptom Support Tool is available on the COVID19.colorado.gov webpage.

    Pueblo’s COVID-19 Case Updates
    Health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced today that two Pueblo County residents have died related to COVID-19. A 94-year-old female and a 98-year-old female, who were previously reported positive, died. The two reported deaths bring the total in Pueblo County to 27.

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced 11 new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County since Monday, June 22. The positives cases are a 16-year-old female, 25-year-old female, 29-year-old female, 30-year-old female, 33-year-old female, 41-year-old female, 44-year-old female, 48-year-old female, 83-year-old female, 18-year-old male and a 92-year-old male. Pueblo County has a total of 369 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. The total number of people testing, 7,234, is not reflective of everyone testing negative in Pueblo County.

    Confirmed and probable cases have been combined to align with state and national data. However, the COVID-19 Status Update chart will continue to show probable cases.

    As cases continue to be investigated, the data in this update is subject to change.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Confirmed and Probable COVID-19 Case in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age       Cases
    Group

    0-9        6
    10-19   15
    20-29   59       
    30-39   42       
    40-49   59
    50-59   57
    60-69   44
    70-79   36
    80+      51        

    Confirmed and Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female            222
    Male               143
    Unavailable    4                     

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Death by Age Group
    Age      Cases
    Group
    0-9       0

    10-19    0
    20-29    0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   3
    60-69   3        
    70-79    6        
    80+      15

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Deaths by Sex
    Female            9
    Male               17
    Unavailable    1         

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to: 

    • Follow the Governor’s Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors order.
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities.
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher, chills, headache, sore throat and new loss of smell or taste, call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Seek preventative and routine care through your primary care provider and use the emergency room when medically necessary.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.
    • Stay home when you’re sick.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday (closed for government holidays) 719-583-4444.

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    06/22: Pueblo Updates

    Governor Polis Signs Several Executive Orders Pertaining to COVID-19 Response
    Governor Jared Polis recently extended several executive orders pertaining to the response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Polis extended the order requiring certain workers, including critical businesses and mass transportation operations, to wear non-medical face coverings while working.  Polis also extended Executive Order D 2020 109, which extends the state of disaster emergency and providing additional fund for response activities due to the presence of COVID-19. Other executive orders signed pertain to Medicaid home health workforce (click here), criminal justice (click here) and emergency rules extending the expiration date of licenses and other documents (click here).

    State Department of Regulatory Agencies Updates for Salons, Spas and Sole Practitioners
    The Colorado Department of Regulatory Agencies (DORA) has provided additional guidance for salons, spas and sole practitioners of personal services in response to the seventh amended Public Health Order 20-28.

    The following spa/salon services are NOT permitted at this time, as hygiene and sanitation cannot be assured to the level required at this time: jet baths, mud baths, saunas, steam rooms and whirlpools. The updated guidance can be viewed here.

    Civil Rights Guidance for Employers and Places of Public Accommodation Finalized
    The Colorado Department of Regulatory Agencies (DORA) released civil rights guidance for employers and places of public accommodation under the Safer at Home in the Vast, Great Outdoors. The guidance, which was developed as a result of stakeholder meetings. The guidance can be found here.

    Colorado’s Symptom Support Tool
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has revised the Colorado COVID Symptom Support Tool which allows individuals to share their COVID-19 symptoms and to help people get connected to resources to help them feel better. The support tool also provides a Frequently Asked Questions section and provides county-by-county data from those reporting their symptoms. The Symptom Support Tool is available on the COVID19.colorado.gov webpage.

    Pueblo County’s Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Open Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday 9am-3pm
    Pueblo County’s free COVID-19 drive-thru testing at the Colorado State Fairgrounds is open on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

    Currently, the following individuals can be tested for COVID-19 at Pueblo’s COVID-19 Drive-Thru Testing:

    • Any individual who is symptomatic (symptoms include body aches, loss of sense of taste or smell, cough, difficulty breathing, fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain
    • Anyone over the age of 65 (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • African American, Latino, American Indian Tribes (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • Anyone who had contact with a person who has tested positive for COVID-19
    • Health care workers and first responders (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • A resident of a long-term care facility or anyone experiencing homelessness
    • Attended a large gathering or protest

    The testing site at the Colorado State Fairgrounds (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue) is drive-thru only and individuals must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive-up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    View a video of the COVID-19 Self-Swabbing Test https://youtu.be/vsQVxsQY3jc

    Pueblo’s COVID-19 Case Updates
    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced three new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County since Friday, June 19. The confirmed positives cases are a 20-year-old female, 29-year-old female and a 64-year-old male. Pueblo County has a total of 358 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. The total number of people testing, 7,234, is not reflective of everyone testing negative in Pueblo County.

    Confirmed and probable cases have been combined to align with state and national data. However, the COVID-19 Status Update chart will continue to show probable cases.

    As cases continue to be investigated, the data in this update is subject to change.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Confirmed and Probable COVID-19 Case in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age       Cases
    Group

    0-9        6
    10-19   13
    20-29   57       
    30-39   40       
    40-49   56
    50-59   57
    60-69   44
    70-79   36
    80+      49        

    Confirmed and Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex

    Female            213
    Male               141
    Unavailable    4                     

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Death by Age Group
    Age      Cases
    Group
    0-9       0

    10-19    0
    20-29    0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   3
    60-69   3        
    70-79    6        
    80+      13

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Deaths by Sex
    Female            7
    Male               17
    Unavailable    1         

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to: 

    • Follow the Governor’s Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors order.
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities.
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher, chills, headache, sore throat and new loss of smell or taste, call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Seek preventative and routine care through your primary care provider and use the emergency room when medically necessary.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.
    • Stay home when you’re sick.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday (closed for government holidays) 719-583-4444.

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    06/17: Pueblo Updates

    State Health Department Releases Potential COVID-19 Risk Guide
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment released a guide to help people understand the potential risks of certain activities to include travel, camping and gyms. While there is no way to ensure zero risk of infection, deciding whether an activity is worth the risk is an individual decision. People should consider whether they or the people they live with have an extra risk of serious illness from COVID-19. People with an extra risk should limit in-person interaction with others as much as possible and carefully consider the risks and benefits of activities which they choose to participate.

    Symptomatic Individuals Encouraged to do Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment offers a short survey to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in each area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “Do you have symptoms?” webpage on the COVID-19 website here.

    Pueblo County’s Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Open Through June
    Open Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday 9am-3pm
    Pueblo County’s free COVID-19 drive-thru testing at the Colorado State Fairgrounds is open through June on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

    Currently, the following individuals can be tested for COVID-19 at Pueblo’s COVID-19 Drive-Thru Testing:

    • Any individual who is symptomatic (symptoms include body aches, loss of sense of taste or smell, cough, difficulty breathing, fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain
    • Anyone over the age of 65 (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • African American, Latino, American Indian Tribes (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • Anyone who had contact with a person who has tested positive for COVID-19
    • Health care workers and first responders (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • A resident of a long-term care facility or anyone experiencing homelessness
    • Attended a large gathering or protest

    The testing site at the Colorado State Fairgrounds (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue) is drive-thru only and individuals must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive-up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    View a video of the COVID-19 Self-Swabbing Test https://youtu.be/vsQVxsQY3jc

    Pueblo’s COVID-19 Case Updates
    Health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced today that one Pueblo County resident has died related to COVID-19. A 72-year-old male, who was previously reported confirmed positive, died. The reported death bring the total in Pueblo County to 25.

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced two new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County since Monday, June 15. The confirmed positives cases are a 29-year-old female, 65-year-old male. Pueblo County has a total of 351 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. The total number of people testing, 7,058 is not reflective of everyone testing negative in Pueblo County.

    Confirmed and probable cases have been combined to align with state and national data. However, the COVID-19 Status Update chart will continue to show probable cases.

    As cases continue to be investigated, the data in this update is subject to change.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Confirmed and Probable COVID-19 Case in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age       Cases
    Group

    0-9        5
    10-19   13
    20-29   55       
    30-39   39       
    40-49   55
    50-59   57
    60-69   42
    70-79   36
    80+      49        

    Confirmed and Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female            209
    Male               138
    Unavailable    4                     

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Death by Age Group
    Age      Cases
    Group
    0-9       0

    10-19    0
    20-29    0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   3
    60-69   3        
    70-79    6        
    80+      13

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Deaths by Sex
    Female            7
    Male               17
    Unavailable    1         

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to: 

    • Follow the Governor’s Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors order.
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities.
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher, chills, headache, sore throat and new loss of smell or taste, call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Seek preventative and routine care through your primary care provider and use the emergency room when medically necessary.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.
    • Stay home when you’re sick.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday (closed for government holidays) 719-583-4444.

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    06/15: Pueblo Updates

    Governor Announces Policy Updates to Safer at Home in the Vast, Great Outdoors 

    Governor Jared Polis announced this afternoon several policy updates to the Safer at Home in the Vast, Great Outdoors. The guidance, which goes into effect Thursday, June 18, pertains to residential summer camps, indoor events, outdoor events, bars, personal services and non-critical manufacturing facilities. The updates to the guidance is available on the COVID19.colorado.gov website. Polis also announced the state is seeking feedback on draft guidance for residential camps, indoor events and outdoor events. Feedback will be accepted on the COVID19.colorado.gov website. 

    Symptomatic Individuals Encouraged to do Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey  
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment offers a short survey to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in each area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “Do you have symptoms?” webpage on the COVID-19 website 
    here 

    Pueblo County’s Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Open Through June 
    Open Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday 9am-3pm 
    Pueblo County’s free COVID-19 drive-thru testing at the Colorado State Fairgrounds is open through June on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.   

    Currently, the following individuals can be tested for COVID-19 at Pueblo’s COVID-19 Drive-Thru Testing:  

    • Any individual who is symptomatic (symptoms include body aches, loss of sense of taste or smell, cough, difficulty breathing, fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain 
    • Anyone over the age of 65 (symptomatic or asymptomatic)  
    • African American, Latino, American Indian Tribes (symptomatic or asymptomatic)  
    • Anyone who had contact with a person who has tested positive for COVID-19  
    • Health care workers and first responders (symptomatic or asymptomatic)  
    • A resident of a long-term care facility or anyone experiencing homelessness  
    • Attended a large gathering or protest 

    The testing site at the Colorado State Fairgrounds (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue) is drive-thru only and individuals must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive-up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free. 

    View a video of the COVID-19 Self-Swabbing Test https://youtu.be/vsQVxsQY3jc 

    Governor Signs Executive Orders Addressing Evictions, Housing Assistance and Unemployment Insurance 

    Governor Jared Polis signed several executive orders over the weekend that help individuals impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Polis signed Executive Order D 2020 101,  which orders state agencies to help prevent evictions of tenants economically impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. Polis also signed Executive Order D 2020 099, which allows the Department of Local Affairs to continue to provide rental and mortgage assistance and encourage local governments to loosen housing restrictions. Another Executive Order signed by Polis continues to expedite unemployment insurance claims processing and providing relief to public utility customers affected by COVID-19. 

    Pueblo’s COVID-19 Case Updates  
    Health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced today that two Pueblo County residents have died related to COVID-19. A 90-year-old male and an 84-year-old male, both who previously were reported confirmed positive, died. The two reported deaths bring the total in Pueblo County to 24.  

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced 20 new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County since Friday, June 12. The confirmed positives cases are a 61-year-old female, 66-year-old female,  69-year-old female, 72-year-old female, 73-year-old female, 74-year-old female, 77-year-old female, 77-year-old female, 79-year-old female, 88-year-old female, 89-year-old female, 91-year-old female, 92-year-old female, 92-year-old female, 93-year-old female,  97-year-old female, 99-year-old female, a 55-year-old male, 73-year-old male and a 81-year-old male. Pueblo County has a total of 350 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. The total number of people testing, 6,753 is not reflective of everyone testing negative in Pueblo County. 

    Confirmed and probable cases have been combined to align with state and national data. However, the COVID-19 Status Update chart will continue to show probable cases. 

    As cases continue to be investigated, the data in this update is subject to change. 

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.  

    Confirmed and Probable COVID-19 Case in Pueblo by Age Group 
    Age       Cases 
    Group 

    0-9        5 
    10-19   13 
    20-29   54 
    30-39   39 
    40-49   55 
    50-59   57 
    60-69   41 
    70-79   37 
    80+      50 
     
    Confirmed and Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex 
    Female           211 
    Male               136 
    Unavailable   4 

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Death by Age Group 
    Age Cases 
    Group 
    0-9          0 
    10-19      0 
    20-29      0 
    30-39      0 
    40-49      0 
    50-59      3  
    60-69      3 
    70-79      5 
    80+         13 

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Deaths by Sex 
    Female             7 
    Male                 16 
    Unavailable     1 

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19 
    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to:   

    • Follow the Governor’s Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors order.  
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities.  
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.  
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher, chills, headache, sore throat and new loss of smell or taste, call your medical provider before visiting them.  
    • Seek preventative and routine care through your primary care provider and use the emergency room when medically necessary. 
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.  
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.  
    • Stay home when you’re sick.  
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.  
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.  
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.  

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:   

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information CenterPueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday (closed for government holidays) 719-583-4444 

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you. 

  •  

    06/12: Pueblo Cases

    Pueblo County Receives Partial Approval of Variance
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has approved portions of Pueblo County’s variance request to portions of Public Health Order 20-28 Safer at Home. The variance approval pertains to increases in the permitted size of outdoor and indoor activities with guidance for gathering sizes, house of worship, gyms, theaters, bowling alleys, indoor malls, bars, wineries, tasting rooms, distilleries, graduation ceremonies, libraries, private membership organizations, indoor malls entertainment and recreation (youth and adult league and recreational ball parks, dog parks, skating rinks, museums, race tracks). One request that was not approved in the variance was allowing personal services of estheticians to resume due to CDPHE still working on a framework for this service. To read more on the variance click here.

    Colorado Tourism Office Launches Campaign Encouraging Travelers to Protect Destinations and People
    The Colorado Tourism Office released a video promoting the state’s new stance on responsible travel, encouraging visitors to show care for destinations and the people who live there. The video, which can be seen here, shares steps on keeping everyone safe, including references to social distancing and wearing face masks.

    Symptomatic Individuals Encouraged to do Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment offers a short survey to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in each area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “Do you have symptoms?” webpage on the COVID-19 website here.

    Pueblo County’s Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Open Through June
    Open Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday 9am-3pm
    Pueblo County’s free COVID-19 drive-thru testing at the Colorado State Fairgrounds is open through June on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

    Currently, the following individuals can be tested for COVID-19 at Pueblo’s COVID-19 Drive-Thru Testing:

    • Any individual who is symptomatic (symptoms include body aches, loss of sense of taste or smell, cough, difficulty breathing, fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain
    • Anyone over the age of 65 (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • African American, Latino, American Indian Tribes (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • Anyone who had contact with a person who has tested positive for COVID-19
    • Health care workers and first responders (symptomatic or asymptomatic)
    • A resident of a long-term care facility or anyone experiencing homelessness
    • Attended a large gathering or protest

    The testing site at the Colorado State Fairgrounds (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue) is drive-thru only and individuals must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive-up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    View a video of the COVID-19 Self-Swabbing Test https://youtu.be/vsQVxsQY3jc

    Pueblo’s COVID-19 Case Updates

    Health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced today that two Pueblo County residents have died related to COVID-19. A 92-year-old male and a 91-year-old female, both who previously were reported confirmed positive, died. The two reported deaths bring the total in Pueblo County to 22. A previously reported death of a probable COVID-19 case has since been determined to be unrelated to COVID-19.

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced seven new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County since Wednesday, June 10. The confirmed positives cases are a 44 y-year-old female, 64-year-old female, 70-year-old female, 72-year-old female, 93-year-old female, 44-year-old male and a 85-year-old male. Pueblo County has a total of 330 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. The total number of people testing, 6,709 is not reflective of everyone testing negative in Pueblo County.

    Confirmed and probable cases have been combined to align with state and national data. However, the COVID-19 Status Update chart will continue to show probable cases.

    As cases continue to be investigated, the data in this update is subject to change.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    COVID-19 Status Update charts unavailable at time of this report.

    Confirmed and Probable COVID-19 Case in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age       Cases
    Group

    0-9        5
    10-19   13
    20-29   54       
    30-39   39       
    40-49   55
    50-59   56
    60-69   38
    70-79   30
    80+      41

    Confirmed and Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female            194
    Male               133
    Unavailable    4                     

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Death by Age Group
    Age      Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   3
    60-69   3         
    70-79   5         
    80+      11

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Deaths by Sex
    Female            7
    Male               14
    Unavailable    1         

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to: 

    • Follow the Governor’s Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors order.
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities.
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher, chills, headache, sore throat and new loss of smell or taste, call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Seek preventative and routine care through your primary care provider and use the emergency room when medically necessary.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.
    • Stay home when you’re sick.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday (closed for government holidays) 719-583-4444.

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    06/08: Pueblo Cases

    Symptomatic Individuals Encouraged to do Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment offers a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in each area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “Do you have symptoms?” webpage on the COVID-19 website here.

    Pueblo County’s Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Extended Through June
    Open Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday 9am-3pm

    Pueblo County’s free COVID-19 drive-thru testing at the Colorado State Fairgrounds is extended through June on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. to test anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 (body aches, loss of sense of taste or smell, cough, difficulty breathing, fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain) and certain groups of asymptomatic people.

    The testing site at the Colorado State Fairgrounds (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue) is drive-thru only and individuals must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive-up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    View a video of the COVID-19 Self-Swabbing Test https://youtu.be/vsQVxsQY3jc

    Pueblo’s COVID-19 Case Updates
    Health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment today announced the death of one Pueblo County resident related to COVID-19, bringing the total number of Pueblo County deaths to 21. A 101-year-old female, who was reported as confirmed positive for COVID-19, has died.

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment also announced eight new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County since Friday, June 5. The confirmed positives cases are a 21-year-old female, 33-year-old female, 46-year-old female, 101-year-old female, 45-year-old male, 49-year-old male, 72-year-old male and an 84-year-old male. Pueblo County has a total of 320 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. The total number of people testing, 6,282 is not reflective of everyone testing negative in Pueblo County.

    Confirmed and probable cases have been combined to align with state and national data. However, the COVID-19 Status Update chart will continue to show probable cases.

    As cases continue to be investigated, the data in this update is subject to change.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Confirmed and Probable COVID-19 Case in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age       Cases
    Group

    0-9        5
    10-19   11
    20-29   53       
    30-39   38       
    40-49   53
    50-59   56
    60-69   37
    70-79   29
    80+      38

    Confirmed and Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female            185
    Male               131
    Unavailable    4                     

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Death by Age Group
    Age      Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   3
    60-69   3         
    70-79   6         
    80+      9

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Deaths by Sex
    Female            6
    Male               14
    Unavailable    1         

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to: 

    • Follow the Governor’s Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors order.
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities.
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher, chills, headache, sore throat and new loss of smell or taste, call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Seek preventative and routine care through your primary care provider and use the emergency room when medically necessary.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.
    • Stay home when you’re sick.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday (closed for government holidays) 719-583-4444.

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    06/05: Pueblo Updates

    Pueblo Parks and Recreation Begins Reopening Some Facilities, Amenities and Programs
    The City of Pueblo opened several recreation facilities, amenities and programs today (Friday, June 5) under special health and safety conditions include wearing of masks and social distancing requirements. Facilities that opened today are the City Park dog park, playgrounds and outdoor fitness equipment, park shelters and gazebos, softball fields and tennis courts. More information on the specific guidelines for use of these facilities and the health and safety conditions is available on the parks and recreation website at www.pueblo.us/100/Parks-Recreation.

    The parks and recreation department continues to work on a plan to open the four outdoor swimming pools. The City Park pool is scheduled to open for lap swimming and swim team practice on June 15 and for public swimming on June 26. Mineral Palace Park pool is scheduled to open June 26 for public swimming, while the pools at Bessemer Park and Mitchell Park are scheduled to open July 3.

    Parks and trails are open for walking, biking and running.

    Facilities that remain closed are the Pueblo Ice Arena, El Centro del Quinto Sol recreation center, the rides at City Park, Movies in the Park and the Sun City Marching Band.

    Pueblo West Parks and Recreation Begins Opening Facilities
    The Pueblo West Parks and Recreation Department will open playgrounds, tennis courts, the skate park, fields and public restrooms beginning Monday, June 8. The splash pad at Civic Center Park will open June 15.  For more information go to the Pueblo West Metro District website at www.pueblowestmetro.com.

    Pueblo West Metro District Cancels Annual Fourth of July Parade
    The Pueblo West Metropolitan District announced the annual Fourth of July parade has been cancelled this year. The metro district continues to work on a plan for a fireworks show to accommodate the north and south side of Pueblo West. Details will be released at a later date.

    District 60 Begins Summer Drive-Thru Meal Program on June 9
    District 60’s summer drive-thru meal program will begin June 9 and operate through July 31. The program will operate similar to the current grab-and-go meal distribution that has been held the past two months. Meal kits will be provided to children up to the age of 18 from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Tuesdays and Fridays. Three days worth of meals, to include breakfast and lunch, will be distributed each day. Social distancing guidelines will be adhered to during the distribution process. Meals will be distributed at the following locations:

    • Bessemer Academy, 1125 E. Routt Avenue
    • East High School, 9 MacNeil Road
    • Heritage Elementary, 625 Brown Avenue
    • Irving Elementary, 1629 W. 21st Street
    • Pueblo Academy of Arts, 29 Lehigh Avenue
    • Risley Middle School, 625 Monument Avenue
    • South Park Elementary, 3100 Hollywood Drive

    Meal distribution will be discontinued at Heaton Middle School on June 8 and senior citizen meals will end at all locations beginning June 30.

    District 60 partners with Care and Share to Host Food Pantries at Two Schools
    District 60, in partnership with Care and Share of Pueblo, will host food pantries at South Park Elementary School on June 15, June 29 and July 13 and at Irving Elementary on June 22, July 6 and July 20. The pantries will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the designated days.

    Mayor Gradisar Weekly Address Encourages Residents to Get Tested and Easing Restrictions
    In Mayor Nick Gradisar’s weekly address he encouraged residents to get tested for COVID-19 and discussed easing of restrictions in the City of Pueblo. View the mayor’s address here https://youtu.be/R4a0yj9aURk?t=170

    Black Hills Energy Warns Customers of Scam
    Black Hills Energy is warning customers of a scam in which a caller tells the customer their bill is delinquent, and service will be disconnected in 30 minutes if the bill isn’t paid. Black Hills Energy reminds customers during the COVID-19 pandemic it has suspended nonpayment disconnections to customers. Customers with concerns about the identity of someone claiming to represent the company, should call Black Hills at 1-888-890-5554 to verify employment.

    Governor Signs Executive Order Benefitting Restaurants
    Governor Jared Polis signed an executive order today that cuts the red tape for restaurants and suspends certain statutes to allow for the service of alcoholic beverages in temporary outdoor dining spaces. The order allows for restaurants to obtain temporary approval from state and local licensing authorities to modify their licensed premises to include outdoor dining areas within 1,000 feet of the restaurant and allows for the consumption of alcoholic beverages on a public right-of-way authorized by ordinance, resolution or rule adopted by a municipality, city and county or county. The order also requires the Department of Revenue’s Liquor Enforcement Division to respond to the submission of an application for the temporary modification of a license within 24 hours. To read the order click here.

    Governor Announces $44 Million in Emergency Education Relief Funds
    Governor Jared Polis announced this week that $44 million has been allocated from the Governor’s Emergency Relief Funds for school districts, schools, higher education institutions and other education-related entities to address the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. The majority of the money will be used for schools and institutions serving high-need students to help prevent and address achievement gaps exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic and support innovation and equity.

    Symptomatic Individuals Encouraged to do Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment launched a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in each area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “Do you have symptoms?” webpage on the COVID-19 website here.

    Pueblo County’s Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Extended Through June
    Pueblo County’s free COVID-19 drive-thru testing at the Colorado State Fairgrounds is extended through June on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. to test anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 (body aches, loss of sense of taste or smell, cough, difficulty breathing, fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain) and certain groups of asymptomatic people.

    The testing site at the Colorado State Fairgrounds (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue) is drive-thru only and individuals must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive-up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    View a video of the COVID-19 Self-Swabbing Test https://youtu.be/vsQVxsQY3jc

    Pueblo’s COVID-19 Case Updates
    Health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment today announced the death of one Pueblo County resident related to COVID-19, bring the total number of Pueblo County deaths to 20. A 52-year-old male, who was reported as confirmed positive for COVID-19, has died.

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment also announced 10 new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County since Wednesday, June 3. The confirmed positives cases are a 18-year-old female, 42-year-old female, 42-year-old female, 59-year-old female, 84-year-old female, 19-year-old male, 38-year-old male, 46-year-old male, 72-year-old male and a 90-year-old male. Pueblo County has a total of 312 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. The total number of people testing, 6,257 is not reflective of everyone testing negative in Pueblo County.

    As of May 27, confirmed and probable cases have been combined to align with state and national data. However, the COVID-19 Status Update chart will continue to show probable cases.

    As cases continue to be investigated, the data in this update is subject to change.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Confirmed and Probable COVID-19 Cases** in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age       Cases
    Group

    0-9        5
    10-19   11
    20-29   52       
    30-39   37       
    40-49   50
    50-59   56
    60-69   37
    70-79   28
    80+      36

    Confirmed and Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female            181
    Male               127
    Unavailable    4                     

    **As of May 27, reporting confirmed, and probable cases have been combined to align with state and national data.

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Death by Age Group
    Age      Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   3
    60-69   3         
    70-79   6         
    80+      8

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Deaths by Sex
    Female            5
    Male               14
    Unavailable    1         

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to: 

    • Follow the Governor’s Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors order
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher, chills, headache, sore throat and new loss of smell or taste, call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Seek preventative and routine care through your primary care provider and use the emergency room when medically necessary.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.
    • Stay home when you’re sick.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday (closed for government holidays) 719-583-4444.

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    06/05: Pueblo’s Drive-Thru Testing COVID-19 Results Delivered by Phone Call

    Pueblo, CO – Individuals who are tested for COVID-19 at the community drive-thru testing site at the Colorado State Fairgrounds will receive a phone call from a third-party call center with their test results.

    “The COVID-19 Hotline has been receiving many phone calls from community members wanting their COVID test results from the drive-thru testing site. Everyone being tested receives information at the testing site on how they will get their results,” said Randy Evetts, public health director for the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment. “Test results are typically available within three to five days and are delivered by a phone call.” 

    All individuals tested at the drive-thru site will receive a phone call from 1-833-447-0001 and the caller ID should state “Result Center”. Should the individual miss the call, the result center will attempt two more times to reach the individual with their results. If after a third call there is still no answer, a voice message will be left indicating the individual’s test results will be posted on the Quest patient portal 24 hours after the results are available. To set up a portal account, individuals should go to MyQuest.QuestDiagnostics.com or download the MyQuest app. 

    Anyone needing a copy of their test results can access it through the MyQuest account. 

    The free drive-thru testing in Pueblo will continue from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday through June at the State Fairgrounds (enter through Gate 4). Anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 (body aches, loss of sense of taste or smell, cough, difficulty breathing, fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain) and certain groups of asymptomatic people are eligible to be tested. 

    The testing site is drive-thru only and individuals being tested must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to individuals from neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive-up testing. No physician order is required and all testing is free.  

    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the most vulnerable in Pueblo by: 

    • Follow the Governor’s Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors order 
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities 
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people 
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher, chills, headache, sore throat and new loss of smell or taste, call your medical provider before visiting them. 
    • Seek preventative and routine care through your primary care provider and use the emergency room when medically necessary.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you’re sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:  

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo County’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday-Friday at (719) 583-4444. 

    At times the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you. 

  •  

    5/29: Outbreak Reported at Third Facility

    Friday, May 29, 2020 – Pueblo CO – Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment reported a COVID-19 outbreak at a long-term care facility in Pueblo. To date, the University Park Care Center has one staff member and two residents who tested positive for COVID-19.

    According to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, an outbreak in a healthcare facility is defined as two or more confirmed cases of COVID-19 in a facility or non-household group with onset in a 14-day period. An outbreak in a healthcare facility is defined as two or more confirmed COVID-19 cases in residents with onset in a 14-day period.

    “Preventing the spread of COVID-19 in Pueblo and protecting the health of the residents and staff of Pueblo's long-term care facilities is a top priority,” said Randy Evetts, public health director for the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment. “We wish for a full and quick recovery while will continue to work with University Park Care Center to help minimize the spread of the virus.”

    A resident at University Park Care Center tested positive for COVID-19 along with one other resident and a staff member testing positive. PDPHE’s contact investigations, are ongoing per established public health process and guidelines to reduce the spread of the virus in the facility.  

    Visiting restrictions at University Park Care Center were started in mid-March. Public health is working with University Park Care Center to ensure guidance is being followed to protect the residents and the staff.

    University Park Care Center is the third facility in Pueblo County to report an outbreak. In April, PDPHE announced an outbreak at Brookdale El Camino. May 28 Brookdale El Camino passed 28 days with no new illnesses in the facility, classifying the COVID-19 outbreak as over.

    In May, PDPHE announced an outbreak at Columbine Chateau. 

    CDPHE reports outbreaks at facilities statewide is updated weekly on Wednesdays at https://covid19.colorado.gov/data/outbreak-data.

  •  

    5/28: Drive-Thru Testing

    What you need:

    • Vehicle - only people being testing in the car, must have functional windows
    • No Motorcycles
    • Photo ID

    Colorado State Fair Grounds

    (Enter Gate 4)

    Tuesday - Thursday 9:00am - 3:00pm

    Through June

    Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline: (719) 583-4444

    www.puebloemergency.info

  •  

    5/28: Pueblo Cases

    Pueblo County’s Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site
    Pueblo County’s free COVID-19 drive-thru testing at the Colorado State Fairgrounds is Friday, May 29, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. to test anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 (body aches, loss of sense of taste or smell, cough, difficulty breathing, fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain) and certain groups of asymptomatic people. The testing site at the Colorado State Fairgrounds (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue) is drive-thru only and individuals must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    View a video of the COVID-19 Self-Swabbing Test https://youtu.be/vsQVxsQY3jc

    Pueblo Receives Personal Protective Equipment from Unified Command Center Distribution
    Pueblo County was among other counties throughout the state to receive a shipment of personal protective equipment from the Unified Command Center. Pueblo County received a shipment of KN95 masks, surgical masks, face shields, gloves and hand sanitizer. The county election office also received masks, hand sanitizer and thermometers.

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment Updates to be Released Three Times a Week
    As a coordinated response to the COVID-19 public health emergency, the Pueblo Department of Public Health will provide updates from a variety of local agencies responding to this health emergency and COVID-19 case updates. Beginning June 1, local updates will go out at 4 p.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

    Symptomatic Individuals Encouraged to do Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment launched a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in each area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “do you have symptoms?” webpage  on the COVID-19 website.

    Pueblo’s COVID-19 Case Updates
    Health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment today announced the death of one Pueblo County resident related to COVID-19, bringing the total number of Pueblo County deaths to 18. A 72-year-old male, who was reported as a confirmed positive, has died.

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Health and Environment announced today 6 new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County.  The confirmed positives cases are a 55-year-old female, 63-year-old female, 22-year-old male, 45-year-old male, 52-year-old male and a 72-year-old male.

    Pueblo County has a total of 282 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. The total number of people testing, 5,130 is not reflective of everyone testing negative in Pueblo County.

    Beginning May 27, reporting confirmed and probable cases will be combined to align with state and national data. However, the COVID-19 Status Update chart will continue to show probable cases.

    As cases continue to be investigated, the data in this update is subject to change.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Confirmed and Probable COVID-19 Cases** in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9        5
    10-19   8
    20-29   49       
    30-39   34
    40-49   45
    50-59   52
    60-69   36
    70-79   25
    80+      28

    Confirmed and Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female            167
    Male               111
    Unavailable    4                     

    **Beginning May 27, reporting confirmed, and probable cases will be combined to align with state and national data.

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19
    Death in Pueblo by Age Group

    Age      Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   2
    60-69   3         
    70-79   5
    80+      8

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Deaths
    by Sex

    Female            5
    Male               12
    Unavailable    1         

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to: 

    • Follow Governor's Safer at Home order
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.  Contact your health care provider.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you are sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday (closed for government holidays) 719-583-4444.

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-9 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    5/27: Pueblo Cases

    Pueblo County’s Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Open Through Friday

    Pueblo County’s free COVID-19 drive-thru testing at the Colorado State Fairgrounds to be open through Friday, May 29.  The testing site will be open Thursday and Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. to test anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 (body aches, loss of sense of taste or smell, cough, difficulty breathing, fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain) and certain groups of asymptomatic people. The testing site at the Colorado State Fairgrounds (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue) is drive-thru only and individuals must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    View a video of the COVID-19 Self-Swabbing Test https://youtu.be/vsQVxsQY3jc

    Virtual Graduation Ceremonies Slated Through Saturday for District 60 Schools

    District 60 will kick-off Graduation Week for members of the Class of 2020 with virtual ceremonies scheduled through Saturday, May 30. The celebration begins tonight with the Academic Excellence ceremony at 6:30 p.m.  Commencement ceremonies begin Thursday evening and will commence Saturday afternoon. All ceremonies will be live streamed on Comcast Channel 18, Facebook and the district’s Vimeo page. The graduation ceremonies and times are listed below:

    • May 28 - Paragon High School at 6 p.m.
    • May 29 – Centennial High School, 3 p.m.; Central High School, 7 p.m.
    • May 30 – South High School, 8 a.m.; East High School, Noon

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment Updates to be Released Three Times a Week

    As a coordinated response to the COVID-19 public health emergency, the Pueblo Department of Public Health will provide updates from a variety of local agencies responding to this health emergency and COVID-19 case updates. Beginning June 1, local updates will go out at 4 p.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

    Symptomatic Individuals Encouraged to do Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment launched a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in each area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “do you have symptoms?” webpage  on the COVID-19 website.

    Pueblo’s COVID-19 Case Updates

    Health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment today announced the death of one Pueblo County resident related to COVID-19, bringing the total number of Pueblo County deaths to 17. A 69-year-old female, who was reported as a confirmed positive, has died.

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Health and Environment announced today 5 new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County.  The confirmed positives cases are a 26-year-old female, 27-year-old female, 30-year-old female, one-year-old male and a 72-year-old male.

    Pueblo County has a total of 276 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. The total number of people testing, 4,937 is not reflective of everyone testing negative in Pueblo County.

    Beginning May 27, reporting confirmed and probable cases will be combined to align with state and national data. However, the COVID-19 Status Update chart will continue to show probables.

    As cases continue to be investigated, the data in this update is subject to change.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Confirmed and Probable COVID-19 Cases** in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age      Cases
    Group

    0-9        5
    10-19   8
    20-29   48       
    30-39   34
    40-49   44
    50-59   50
    60-69   35
    70-79   24
    80+      28

    Confirmed and Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female            165
    Male               107
    Unavailable    4                     

    **Beginning May 27, reporting confirmed, and probable cases will be combined to align with state and national data.

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19
    Death in Pueblo by Age Group

    Age      Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   2
    60-69   3         
    70-79   4
    80+      8

    Pueblo County’s COVID-19 Deaths
    by Sex

    Female            5
    Male               11
    Unavailable    1         

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to: 

    • Follow Governor's Safer at Home order
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.  Contact your health care provider.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you are sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday (closed for government holidays) 719-583-4444.

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-9 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    05/22: Pueblo Cases

    Pueblo County’s Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Winds Down to Last Week 

    Pueblo County’s free COVID-19 drive-thru testing is scheduled to end at the Colorado State Fairground on Friday, May 29.   The testing site, which has had 2,554 people tested since April 22, will be open Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. to test  anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 (body aches, loss of sense of taste or smell, cough, difficulty breathing, fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain) and certain groups of asymptomatic people. The testing site at the Colorado State Fairgrounds (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue) is drive-thru only and individuals must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free. 

    View a video of the COVID-19 Self-Swabbing Test https://youtu.be/vsQVxsQY3jc 

    Coloradoans Encouraged to Follow Orders During Memorial Day Weekend 

    State officials are encouraging Colorado residents to continue to follow order to slow and limit transmission of COVID-19. The public is encouraged to maintain 6 feet of physical distancing, keep groups under 10 people, wear a face-covering when around others, keep it as local as possible and especially avoid grocery stores, gas stations or other important community resources outside your immediate home area. The public is also encouraged to check out  COTREX to see what trails, trailheads and activities are permissible on state and federal public lands. 

    Symptomatic Individuals Encouraged to do Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey  
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment launched a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in each area or region. The symptom tracker is on the 
    “do you have symptoms?” webpage  on the COVID-19 website.  

    Pueblo’s COVID-19 Case Updates  

    Health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment today announced the death of one Pueblo County resident related to COVID-19, bringing the total number of Pueblo County deaths to 15. A 94-year-old male, who was reported as previous positive, has died. 

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Health and Environment announced today 17 new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County.  The confirmed positives cases are a 16 -year-old female, 24-year-old female, 25-year-old female, 26-year-old female,  27-year-old female, 30 -year-old female, 36-year-old female, 37-year-old female, 44-year-old female, 44-year-old female, 50-year-old female,  28-year-old male, 30-year-old male, 34-year-old male, 35-year-old male, 41-year-old male and 78-year-old male. Pueblo County has a total of 248 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. The total number of people testing, 4,309 is not reflective of everyone testing negative in Pueblo County. 

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Confirmed COVID-19 Cases in Pueblo by Age Group 
    Age Cases 
    Group
     

    0-9        4 
    10-196 
    20-29   40 
    30-3932 
    40-4941 
    50-5946 
    60-6929 
    70-7916 
    80+23 
     
    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Sex 
    Female139 
    Male99
     

    Probable COVID-19 Cases in Pueblo by Age Group 
    Age Cases 
    Group
     

    0-90 
    10-190 
    20-294 
    30-391 
    40-492 
    50-592 
    60-691 
    70-790 
    80+1 
     
    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex 
    Female7 
    Male1 
    Unavailable     3
     

    Pueblo County’s 15 COVID-19 Deaths 
    Death in Pueblo by Age Group 
    Age Cases 
    Group
     

    0-90 
    10-19 0 
    20-29 0 
    30-390 
    40-490 
    50-592  
    60-692 
    70-793 
    80+8
     

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19 
    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to:  
     

    • Follow Governor's Safer at Home order  
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities 
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.  
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them. 
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary. Contact your health care provider. 
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.   
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.   
    • Stay home when you are sick.   
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.   
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.   
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.   

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:   

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information CenterPueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday (closed for government holidays) 719-583-4444 

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-9 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you. 

  •  

    05/22: Positive COVID-19 Numbers Increase

    Pueblo, CO. – As the local community prepares for the Memorial Day weekend, public health officials urge residents to strictly abide by the state’s Safer at Home guidelines, particularly in light of learning today there are 17 new positive COVID-19 cases and one additional death related to COVID-19 in Pueblo County. 

    “Memorial Day traditionally marks the kickoff to summer and people want to get together for barbecues and outdoor activities, but it is important to remember that the virus is still in our community and now more than ever, it is important to be mindful of social distancing, hand washing, and protecting the most vulnerable amongst us,” said Randy Evetts, public health director of the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment. “Today, on the eve of this important holiday weekend, we have 17 more confirmed positive cases and this is the highest single-day number we’ve received since we began testing for COVID-19.” 

    PDPHE officials also reported the 15th death in Pueblo County related to COVID-19 today after learning a 94-year-old male, who previously was reported as a positive, died. This death is the third death reported this week in Pueblo County. It was announced Monday, the deaths of a 56-year-old male and a 79-year-old male, both related to COVID-19. 

    With today’s 17 new positive COVID-19 cases, there have been 49 people who have tested positive in less than a week. Overall, there have been 248 people who have tested positive for the virus. Also this week, an outbreak was reported at the Columbine Chateau in Pueblo West after three residents and one staff member tested positive for COVID-19.  

    “One of the factors that is contributing to the increase in positive cases is that more people are being tested in the community,” Evetts said. “But, the positive cases are also an indication that we, as a community, need to continue to wear masks when in public, follow social distancing guidelines, refrain from gathering in groups larger than 10 people and regularly wash your hands.”  

    Evetts also reminded anyone who is experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 to get tested at the free community testing site. 

    The public is reminded the community drive-thru testing at the Colorado State Fairgrounds is winding down to its final week. Testing is available Tuesday through Friday, May 29 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the fairgrounds (enter through Gate 4 at Mesa and Gaylord avenues). Testing is free and limited to the first 250 people per day. Tests are available to anyone experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 to include fever (100.4 or higher), shortness of breath, cough, headache, chills, body aches, muscle pain, sore throat and new loss of taste or smell. Additionally, the following individuals who are asymptomatic can be tested: 

    • Health care workers and first responders 
    • Anyone over the age of 65 
    • Anyone who has had contact with a person testing positive for COVID-19 
    • African American, Latino and American Indian Tribes 
    • A resident of a long-term care facility and anyone experiencing homelessness 

    The tests are self-administered and all those being tested must be able to conduct the test themselves. Anyone being tested must be in an enclosed vehicle. No bicycles, motorcycles or walk-ups allowed. 

    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the most vulnerable in Pueblo by: 

    • Follow the Governor’s Safer at Home order 
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities 
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people 
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher, chills, headache, sore throat and new loss of smell or taste, call your medical provider before visiting them. 
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary. Contact your health care provider  
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you’re sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:  

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo County’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday-Friday at (719) 583-4444. 

    At times the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    05/21: Memorial Day Holiday

    Pueblo, CO – In observance of the Memorial Day holiday on Monday, May 25, the Pueblo County Emergency Operations Center and the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline will be closed.  Additionally, the daily update media briefing, which includes updated data on Pueblo County COVID-19 cases, will not be distributed on Monday.

    However, Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment staff will continue to do contact tracing and investigations pertaining to COVID-19 positive cases throughout the weekend.

    The COVID-19 hotline will re-open at 9 a.m. on Tuesday, May 26. The updated COVID-19 case numbers from the three-day weekend will be released in the 4 p.m. daily briefing on May 26.

    Governor Jared Polis’ decision on next steps for restaurants, spring skiing and summer camps initially scheduled for Monday, will be announced to the public on Tuesday, May 26. On June 1, Polis is expected to announce next steps for Safer at Home.

    The public is also reminded the final week of the community drive-thru testing at the Colorado State Fairgrounds begins on Tuesday. The testing site, which opened on April 22, will operate for only four more days, May 26, 27, 28, 29. The testing site is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Testing is free and limited to the first 250 people per day. Tests are available to anyone experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 to include fever (100.4 or higher), shortness of breath, cough, headache, chills, body aches, muscle pain, sore throat and new loss of taste or smell. Additionally, the following individuals who are asymptomatic can be tested:

    • Health care workers and first responders
    • Anyone over the age of 65
    • Anyone who has had contact with a person testing positive for COVID-19
    • African American, Latino and American Indian Tribes
    • A resident of a long-term care facility and anyone experiencing homelessness

    The tests are self-administered and all those being tested must be able to conduct the test themselves. Anyone being tested must be in an enclosed vehicle. No bicycles, motorcycles or walk-ups are allowed.

    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the most vulnerable in Pueblo by:

    • Follow the Governor’s Safer at Home order
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher, chills, headache, sore throat and new loss of smell or taste, call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary. Contact your health care provider
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.
    • Stay home when you’re sick.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo County’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday-Friday (closed during observed government holidays) at (719) 583-4444.

    At times the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    05/21: State Seeks Input on Draft Restaurant Guidelines

    Pueblo, CO – The public is invited to provide feedback on guidelines that the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has drafted to guide restaurants when it is safe to re-open for dine-in service. No date has been set yet as to when restaurants will fully open.

    The guidelines are draft only and include plans for how restaurants and foodservice should operate to provide safety for employees and the public due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The guidelines can be viewed on the covid19.colorado.gov. Feedback on the guidelines will be accepted through Friday at this online form.

    Based on the feedback received on the guidelines, CDPHE will finalize the plan which will serve as guidance when it is safe to start easing COVID-19 related safety restrictions for restaurants.

    The state is expected to make a decision on May 25 about a reopening schedule. Restaurants are not allowed to have on-site consumption of food or drink until the dates for reopening are set by CDPHE.

    In the meantime, critical and non-critical businesses, including restaurants who are providing take-out and delivery services, are operating with restrictions that are outlined and available on the covid19.colorado.gov/safer-at-home.

    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the most vulnerable in Pueblo by:

    • Follow the Governor’s Safer at Home order
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher, chills, headache, sore throat and new loss of smell or taste, call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary. Contact your health care provider
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.
    • Stay home when you’re sick.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo County’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday-Friday at (719) 583-4444.

    At times the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    05/20: Community Testing Site Expanded to Four Days a Week to include Friday

    Pueblo, CO. – Pueblo County’s community drive-thru COVID-19 testing at the Colorado State Fairgrounds will be expanded to Fridays beginning May 22. The testing site, which opened in April, is open Tuesday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The site is open through May 29.

    “We are pleased to be able to add an extra two days to our testing schedule which will give us the ability to test up to an additional 500 people in our community,” said Randy Evetts, public health director for the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment. “Our goal is to get as many people tested as we can to not only let community members know if they are positive with COVID-19 but the results will give public health information on how widespread the virus is in Pueblo.”

    Since the drive-thru site opened April 22, there have been 2,417 people tested. The community drive-thru testing site is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at the State Fairgrounds (enter through Gate 4 at Mesa and Gaylord avenues). Testing is free and is limited to 250 people per day. Tests are available to anyone experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 to include fever (100.4 degrees or higher), shortness of breath, cough, headache, chills, body aches, muscle pain, sore throat and new loss of taste or smell.

    Additionally, the following individuals who are asymptomatic can be tested:

    • Healthcare workers and first responders
    • Anyone over the age of 65
    • Anyone who has had contact with a person testing positive for COVID-19
    • African American, Latino and American Indian Tribes
    • A resident of a long-term care facility and anyone experiencing homelessness

    The tests are self-administered and all those being tested must be able to conduct the test themselves. Anyone being tested must be in an enclosed vehicle. No bicycles, motorcycles or walk-ups are allowed.

    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the most vulnerable in Pueblo by:

    • Follow the Governor’s Safer at Home order
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher, chills, headache, sore throat and new loss of smell or taste, call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary. Contact your health care provider
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.
    • Stay home when you’re sick.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo County’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday-Friday at (719) 583-4444.

    At times the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    05/20: Pueblo Cases

    Pueblo County Holding Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Until May 30 at State Fairgrounds

    Pueblo County is hosting a free a drive-thru testing site in Pueblo through May 30 to anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 (cough, difficulty breathing and fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain). Individuals tested must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    The testing site is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at the Colorado State Fairgrounds, 1001 Beulah Avenue (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue).

    Symptomatic Individuals Encouraged to do Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment launched a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in each area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “do you have symptoms?” webpage  on the COVID-19 website.

    Pueblo’s COVID-19 Case Updates

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Health and Environment announced today four new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County.  The confirmed positives cases are a 33-year-old female, 51-year-old female, 94-year-old female and a 55-year-old male. Pueblo County has a total of 223 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. The total number of people testing, 3,938, is not reflective of everyone testing negative in Pueblo County.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Confirmed COVID-19 Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9        4
    10-19   4
    20-29   34       
    30-39   24
    40-49   37
    50-59   44
    60-69   28
    70-79   15
    80+      22

    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female            123     
    Male               89                   

    Probable COVID-19 Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   4
    30-39   1
    40-49   2
    50-59   2
    60-69   1
    70-79   0
    80+      1

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female            7
    Male               1
    Unavailable     3

    Pueblo County’s 14 COVID-19 Deaths
    Death in Pueblo by Age Group

    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   2
    60-69   2         
    70-79   3
    80+      7

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to: 

    • Follow Governor's Safer at Home order
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.  Contact your health care provider.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you are sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday 719-583-4444.

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-9 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    05/19: Outbreak Reported at Second Assisted Living Facility

    Tuesday, May 19, 2020 – Pueblo CO – Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment reported a COVID-19 outbreak at an assisted living facility in Pueblo West. To date, the Columbine Chateau has three residents and one staff member who tested positive for COVID-19.

    According to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, an outbreak in a healthcare facility is defined as two or more confirmed cases of COVID-19 in a facility or non-household group with onset in a 14-day period. An outbreak in a healthcare facility is defined as two or more confirmed COVID-19 cases in residents with onset in a 14-day period.

    “Protecting the health of the residents and staff of our assisted living facilities is a top priority,” said Randy Evetts, public health director for the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment. “We will continue to work with Columbine Chateau to help minimize the spread of the virus.”

    A resident at Columbine Chateau tested positive for COVID-19 on Saturday along with two other residents and a staff member testing positive. PDPHE has completed contact investigations per established public health process and guidelines to reduce the spread of the virus in the facility. 

    In addition, PDPHE made a formal request to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) to provide testing for all staff and residents of this facility.  CDPHE will ship testing materials to the facility directly.  Once the testing is completed by the facility and shipped back to CDPHE, results will be returned within 24 hours.

    Visiting restrictions at Columbine Chateau were started in mid-March. Public health is working with Columbine Chateau to ensure guidance is being followed to protect the residents and the staff.

    Columbine Chateau is the second facility in Pueblo County to report an outbreak. In April, PDPHE announced an outbreak at Brookdale El Camino. At that time, there were four staff members and six residents that tested positive for COVID-19.

    CDPHE reports outbreaks at facilities statewide at https://covid19.colorado.gov/data/outbreak-data.

  •  

    05/19: Pueblo Cases

    Pueblo County Holding Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Until May 30 at State Fairgrounds

    Pueblo County is hosting a free a drive-thru testing site in Pueblo through May 30 to anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 (cough, difficulty breathing and fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain). Individuals tested must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    The testing site is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at the Colorado State Fairgrounds, 1001 Beulah Avenue (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue).

    Symptomatic Individuals Encouraged to do Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment launched a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in each area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “do you have symptoms?” webpage  on the COVID-19 website.

    Parkview Medical Center Modifies Visitor Guideline

    Parkview Medical Center has started allowing one visitor per patient per day with the exception of COVID-19 or patients under investigation for COVID-19. Visitors will be required to wear self-provided face coverings while inside Parkview’s facilities and all visitors will be screened for temperature and symptoms. Anyone with a temperature equal to 100.4 or COVID-19 symptoms will not be allowed to enter the hospital. No visitors under the age of 18 will be permitted.

    Pueblo’s COVID-19 Case Updates

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Health and Environment announced today two new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County. The confirmed positives cases are a 40-year-old female and a 53-year-old female. Pueblo County has a total of 219 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. The total number of people testing, 3,739, is not reflective of everyone testing negative in Pueblo County.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Confirmed COVID-19 Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9        4
    10-19   4
    20-29   34       
    30-39   23
    40-49   37
    50-59   42
    60-69   28
    70-79   15
    80+      21

    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female            120     
    Male               88                   

    Probable COVID-19 Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   4
    30-39   1
    40-49   2
    50-59   2
    60-69   1
    70-79   0
    80+      1

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female            7
    Male               1
    Unavailable     3

    Pueblo County’s 14 COVID-19 Deaths
    Death in Pueblo by Age Group

    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   2
    60-69   2         
    70-79   3
    80+      7

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to: 

    • Follow Governor's Safer at Home order
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.  Contact your health care provider.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you are sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday 719-583-4444.

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-9 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    05/18: Pueblo Update

    Pueblo County Holding Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Until May 30 at State Fairgrounds

    Pueblo County is opened a drive-thru testing site in Pueblo through May 30 to anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 (cough, difficulty breathing and fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain). Individuals tested must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    The testing site is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at the Colorado State Fairgrounds, 1001 Beulah Avenue (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue).

    Pueblo West High School Senior Parade Scheduled for Tuesday Night

    A parade of ONLY staff members from Pueblo West High School honoring high school seniors is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Tuesday (May 19). Students and families are invited to watch and wave along the route. The parade will begin at Pueblo West High School and travel northeast on Spaulding Ave. to Purcell Blvd., then on to Joe Martinez Blvd and back to McCulloch before returning to the high school via Spaulding Ave. A similar parade will be scheduled to honor the Pueblo County High School graduates. Details of that parade have not yet been announced.

    Pueblo Community College Hosts Virtual Graduation Friday Night

    Pueblo Community College will hold a virtual commencement ceremony for the Class of 2020 at 6 p.m. Friday, May 22. The ceremony can be seen on live stream at pueblocc.edu/Livestream, Facebook Live via PCC’s Facebook page or televised in Pueblo on Comcast Xfinity Cable Channel 19.

    Census Field Operations Resume in Colorado

    The U.S. Census Bureau will resume the 2020 Census field operations in Colorado this week. Census employees will observe social distancing protocols and will wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for the health and safety of the employees and the public. Census Bureau field employees will begin dropping off 2020 Census invitation packets at front doors of households in areas that do not receive mail at their homes. The Census Bureau is also resuming fingerprinting for new census takers to keep applicants moving through the hiring process. Click HERE for updates on field operations by location.

    Governor Announces Expanded Testing Capacity; Anyone Who is Symptomatic Should Get Tested

    Governor Jared Polis announced today that Colorado now as the supplies and capacity to test anyone with COVID-19 symptoms. Polis set a goal in late April to test all symptomatic individuals and now with increased capacity, the governor is now urging anyone with symptoms to get tested for the virus. Colorado now has the ability to test: any individual who has COVID-19 symptoms; any individual who is employed as a health care worker, nursing home worker or first responder; any essential worker who directly interacts with the public while working, per state or employer guidelines. The four ways testing is available in Colorado is health care providers, local community-based testing sites, specialized testing sites and private sector partners.

    Governor’s Office to Release Draft Restaurant Guidance

    The Governor’s Office will release on Tuesday draft restaurant guidance and solicit feedback prior to creating a final document. The guidance will be provided to restaurants when they are allowed to re-open. Implementation dates will not be set and will be subject to change based on the trajectory of the epidemiology.

    Governor Extends Order Requiring Critical Business Workers to Wear Face Coverings

    Governor Jared Polis signed an executive order on Sunday to extend the order requiring workers at critical businesses to wear non-medical face coverings while at work and to wear gloves (if gloves are provided by an employer) when in contact with customers or goods. The order is designed to help protect workers and residents in long-term care facilities and many other critical industries. Other orders signed by the Governor on Sunday can be found on the COVID19.colorado.gov.

    Leaders from Diverse Industries Across State Partner to Energize Colorado

    Businesses or non-profit in need of financial support, PPE and supplies, business guidance, free professional services, mental health resources or reopening help are encouraged to visit the new Energize Colorado initiative. The resource is an initiative from the Colorado State Office of Economic Development and International Trade. To learn more go to www.energizecolorado.com.                    

    Symptomatic Individuals Encouraged to do Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment launched a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in each area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “do you have symptoms?” webpage  on the COVID-19 website.

    Health Solutions Accepting New Clients

    Health Solutions announced it has capacity for new clients at the medical center and behavioral health services, to include services for adults and children. For more information call (719) 545-2746 or www.health.solutions.

    Pueblo’s COVID-19 Case Updates

    Pueblo Health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment today announced the deaths of two Pueblo County resident related to COVID-19, bringing the total number of Pueblo County deaths to 14. A 56-year-old male, who was reported as a previous positive case, and a 79-year-old male, who was reported as a previous probable case, passed away from the virus.

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Health and Environment announced today no new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County. Over the weekend, public health officials announced 16 new positive cases of COVID-19 in Pueblo County. The confirmed positives cases are a 28-year-old female, 51-year-old, 59-year-old female, 64-year-old female, 67-year-old female, 68-year-old female, 71-year-old female, 72-year-old female, 74-year-old female, 86-year-old female, 28-year-old male, 33-year-old male, 51-year-old male, 72-year-old male, 92-year-old male and a 94-year-old male.

    Pueblo County has a total of 217 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. The total number of people testing, 3,471, is not reflective of everyone testing negative in Pueblo County.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Confirmed COVID-19 Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9        4
    10-19   4
    20-29   34       
    30-39   23
    40-49   36
    50-59   41
    60-69   28
    70-79   15
    80+      21

    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female            118     
    Male               88                   

    Probable COVID-19 Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   4
    30-39   1
    40-49   2
    50-59   2
    60-69   1
    70-79   0
    80+      1

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female            7
    Male               1
    Unavailable     3

    Pueblo County’s 14 COVID-19 Deaths
    Death in Pueblo by Age Group

    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   2
    60-69   2         
    70-79   3
    80+      7

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to: 

    • Follow Governor's Safer at Home order
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.  Contact your health care provider.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you are sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday 719-583-4444.

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-9 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

     

  •  

    05/14: Pueblo Cases

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Health and Environment announced today ten new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County. The new confirmed positive cases are 20-year-old male, 28-year-old male, 45-year-old male, 49-year-old male, 52-year-old male, 79-year-old male, 36-year-old female, 50-year-old female, 56-year-old female and a 65-year-old female.

    Pueblo County has a total of 195 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. The total number of people testing, 3,382, is not reflective of everyone testing negative in Pueblo County.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Pueblo County’s 195 COVID-19 Confirmed Positive and Probable Cases
    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9        4
    10-19   3
    20-29   32       
    30-39   21
    40-49   34
    50-59   36
    60-69   25
    70-79   11
    80+      18

    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female  105     
    Male      80                   

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   4
    30-39   1
    40-49   2
    50-59   2
    60-69   1
    70-79   0
    80+      1

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female          7
    Male              1
    Unavailable  3

    Pueblo County’s 12 COVID-19 Deaths
    Death in Pueblo by Age Group

    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   1
    60-69   2         
    70-79   2
    80+      7

    Pueblo joins Gov. Polis and communities across Colorado in Day of Remembrance for Coloradans Lost to COVID-19

    Gov. Jared Polis, individuals, and communities across Colorado are coming together this Friday evening at 7p.m. to honor and remember the more than 1,000 Coloradans we have lost to COVID-19. Friday, May 15 is also Peace Officers Memorial Day, which the state will commemorate by lowering flags to half-staff and encourage Coloradans across our state to commemorate as well.

    Coloradans can participate by wearing a protective face covering or masks for a minute of silence to display their effort to do their part to save lives at 7:00 p.m. They can also post on social media to raise awareness about the remembrance event.

    To recognize the Day of Remembrance, the State Capitol, along with cities, counties and other organizations, will be turning their lights red at 7p.m. to honor those who have passed. The state is encouraging buildings and businesses across the state to turn their lights red at 7p.m. and for police and fire departments to turn their lights on at 7p.m. for one minute.

    Lake Pueblo State Park to Open Campground on Friday; Reservations Required

    Campgrounds at Lake Pueblo State Park will open Friday, May 15 with a 50% phased-in approach that allows for only half of the 400 campsites available to campers. Governor Jared Polis announced earlier this week campgrounds at state parks can open. Parks are opening in phases and on differing days. Lake Pueblo Parks officials will open all the campsites beginning May 22, however, Lake Pueblo officials said all campsites are already filled.  Visitors to Lake Pueblo are highly encouraged to call the visitor line at (719) 561-9320 to find out the availability of campsites. Reservations are required and can be made at cpwshop.com. Boating and trails around the park are open, however playgrounds and picnic areas remain closed.  Parks personnel are taking all precautions and remind visitors to practice social distancing and were a face covering where six feet of distance cannot be maintained.

    The following are the state parks’ campground opening dates:

    May 12 – Arkansas Headwaters Recreation Area (Fremont County campgrounds only); Chatfield State Park; Cherry Creek State Park; Eleven Mile State park, Elkhead Reservoir State Park, Highline State Park, Jackson Lake State Park, James M. Robb CO River State Park Island Acres and Fruita; Mancos State Park, Mueller State Park, North Sterling State Park, Rifle Falls State Park, Rifle Gap State Park, Staunton State Park and Vega State Park.

    May 13 – Cheyenne Mountain State Park, Crawford State Park

    May 14 – Boyd Lake State Park, St. Vrain State Park, John Martin Reservoir State Park

    May 15 – Golden Gate Canyon State Park, Lake Pueblo State Park, Lory State Park, Navajo State Park, Ridgway State Park

    The following parks continue to coordinate with local officials for reopening plans. Dates will be announced as they become available:

    Arkansas Headwaters Recreation Area (Chaffee County campgrounds), Lathrop State Park, Paonia State Park, Pearl Lake State Park, Stagecoach State Park, State Forest State Park, Steamboat Lake State Park, Sylva Lake State Park, Trinidad Lake State Park, Yampa River State Park.

    Pueblo County Holding Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Until May 30 at State Fairgrounds               

    Pueblo County is opened a drive-thru testing site in Pueblo through May 30 to anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 (cough, difficulty breathing and fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain). Individuals tested must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    The testing site is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at the Colorado State Fairgrounds, 1001 Beulah Avenue (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue).

    Symptomatic Individuals Encouraged to do Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment launched a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in each area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “do you have symptoms?” webpage  on the COVID-19 website.

    Health Solutions Accepting New Clients

    Health Solutions announced it has capacity for new clients at the medical center and behavioral health services, to include services for adults and children. For more information call (719) 545-2746 or www.health.solutions.

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to: 

    • Follow Governor's Safer at Home order
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.  Contact your health care provider.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you are sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday 719-583-4444.

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-9 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    05/13: Antibody Testing

    Pueblo, CO – Antibody testing for COVID-19 is available locally only through private labs while local public health officials continue to research strategies for communitywide antibody testing.

    “We’re looking at getting antibody testing for the community but working on a strategy and we’re waiting for more data to come out about the tests,” said Randy Evetts, public health director for the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment. “Several private labs are beginning to test but right now the tests are not being widely offered in the community. We are waiting for specific and effective testing for COVID-19.” 

    Currently, there are many antibody tests on the market but not all have been granted authorization by the Food and Drug Administration.  

    Antibody testing checks the blood for COVID-19 antibodies, which are proteins the body makes to attack a virus. The test will show if an individual has had previous infection with the COVID-19 virus, particularly for those individuals who were sick but did not get tested for COVID-19 and for those who were infected but did not get sick. 

    However, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states depending on when someone was infected and the timing of the test, the test may not find antibodies in someone with current COVID-19 infection as it can take up to three weeks after infection to make antibodies. 

    If an individual tests positive on an antibody test, it can show if they have the antibodies from an infection, but it is still unclear if the antibodies can provide protection against getting infected again, according to the CDC. 

    Results of the antibody testing can be used to guide the next steps in the fight against the pandemic, to include providing information on the prevalence if the virus and the frequency of asymptomatic infection. It can also be used to identify potential donors of convalescent plasma. 

    To protect the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to: 

    • Follow the Governor’s Safer at Home order 
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities 
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people 
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher, chills, headache, sore throat and new loss of smell or taste, call your medical provider before visiting them. 
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary. Contact your health care provider  
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you are sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:  

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo County’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday-Friday at (719) 583-4444. 

    At times the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    05/08: Pueblo Cases

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Health and Environment announced today six new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County. The new confirmed positive cases are a 27-year-old female, 33-year-old female, 36-year-old female, 50-year-old female, 26-year-old male and a 39-year-old male.

    Pueblo County has a total of 175 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. A previous positive case has been eliminated as it was reported twice. There have been 2,581 tests administered in Pueblo County.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Pueblo County’s 175 COVID-19 Confirmed Positive and Probable Cases
    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9        4
    10-19   3
    20-29   26       
    30-39   20
    40-49   32
    50-59   30
    60-69   21
    70-79   13
    80+      17

    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female  96       
    Male      68                   

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   4
    30-39   1
    40-49   2
    50-59   2
    60-69   1
    70-79   0
    80+      1

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female         7
    Male             1
    Unavailable  3

    Pueblo County’s 12 COVID-19 Deaths

    Death in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   1
    60-69   2         
    70-79   2
    80+      7

    United Way Fund Distribution Committee Awards Emergency Response & Recovery Grants

    The United Way Fund Distribution Committee has awarded $95,000 in Round 1 of Emergency Response & Recovery Fund grants to the following in Southern Colorado. The following agencies received grants: Boys & Girls Clubs of Pueblo County; Care and Share Food Bank; Catholic Charities, Diocese of Pueblo Inc., Custer County Community Sharing Center, Eastside Action Support Team, La Veta Village Inc., Mount Carmel  Health, Wellness and Community Center; Pueblo Community Soup Kitchen, Pueblo Cooperative Care Center, Pueblo Rescue Mission, Senior Resource Development Agency, Southern Colorado Harm Reduction Association, Tri-County Family Care Center Inc. and YWCA of Pueblo.

    Pueblo Business Economic Recovery Team Conducting Third Survey

    The Pueblo Business Economic Recovery Team is seeking feedback from local businesses with regard to recovery from COVID-19 crisis. The purpose of the survey is to help Pueblo BERT advocate for businesses and to keep the region economically sustainable throughout the COVID-19 crisis. The survey, which is available at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/K9QMWL2 will be open through Sunday, May 10.

    Governor Extends Disaster Emergency Declaration

    Governor Jared Polis today signed an executive order to extend the disaster emergency declaration for COVID-19. The order extends the state of disaster emergency and provides additional funds for response activities due to the presence of COVID-19 in Colorado. The order also extends the employment of the Colorado National Guard to support and provide planning resources to state and local as they respond to the presence of COVID-19 in the state.

    Pueblo County Holding Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Until May 30 at State Fairgrounds               

    Pueblo County is opened a drive-thru testing site in Pueblo through May 30 to anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 (cough, difficulty breathing and fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain). Individuals tested must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    The testing site is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at the Colorado State Fairgrounds, 1001 Beulah Avenue (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue).

    Symptomatic Individuals Encouraged to do Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment launched a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in each area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “do you have symptoms?” webpage  on the COVID-19 website.

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    To protect the Pueblo community and the most vulnerable, everybody has a responsibility to: 

    • Follow Governor's Safer at Home order
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.  Contact your health care provider.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you are sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday 719-583-4444.

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-9 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    05/07: Pueblo Cases

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Health and Environment announced today six new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County. The new confirmed positive cases are a 20-year-old female, 34-year-old female, 46-year-old female, 16-year-old male, 44-year-old male and a 48-year-old male.

    Pueblo County has a total of 169 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. A previous positive case has been eliminated as it was reported twice. There have been 2,318 tests administered in Pueblo County.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Pueblo County’s 169 COVID-19 Confirmed Positive and Probable Cases
    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9        4
    10-19   3
    20-29   24       
    30-39   17
    40-49   32
    50-59   29
    60-69   21
    70-79   13
    80+      17

    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female  92       
    Male      66                   

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   4
    30-39   1
    40-49   2
    50-59   2
    60-69   1
    70-79   0
    80+      1

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female         7
    Male             1
    Unavailable  3

    Pueblo County’s 12 COVID-19 Deaths

    Death in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   1
    60-69   2         
    70-79   2
    80+      7

    Alternative Care Site at St Mary Corwin Projected to be Operational June 18

    The Colorado Unified Command Group announced updates to the operational dates for the alternative care sites in the state including at St. Mary Corwin Medical Center. The projected operational date for St. Mary Corwin is June 18. Construction at the site is expected to be completed May 24. The alternative care sites are medical shelters that will be used to provide medical care if the hospital capacity is exceeded. The operational dates have changed slightly due to the lack of demand for the use of those facilities at this time.

    CDOT Adopts Emergency Rules to Allow Food Trucks to Obtain Permits to Serve Food at Highway Rest Areas, Including in Colorado City

    The Colorado Department of Transportation issued emergency rules to establish the process for food truck operators to obtain permits to serve food at highway rest areas, due to commercial truckers lacking options for food service. Among the rest areas available for food truck service is in Colorado City. Interested food truck operators can view the requirements, rest area sites and apply for a permit at CDOT’s dedicated page. Other rest areas available for food truck service are: Cortez, Edwards, El Moro Trinidad, Rifle Rest Area, Shaw Creek (South Fork), Sterling and Wiggins. 

    Agricultural Recovery Team Established to Set Strategies to Support Agriculture Workers/Businesses

    The Colorado Department of Agriculture has formed the Agricultural Recovery Team to work alongside the Food Security Task Force in developing and implementing innovative strategies to support agricultural workers and businesses in recovery and revitalization of the agricultural economy. The task force will be gathering public feedback for consideration in ag recovery efforts and planning. The ag department is seeking submissions that share current needs and ideas for helping to ensure agriculture and stakeholders are positioned to be successful during the recovery phase of COVID-19. Ideas will be accepted until May 15 through the Food Security Task Force Response form.

    Pueblo County Holding Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Until May 30 at State Fairgrounds               

    Pueblo County is opened a drive-thru testing site in Pueblo through May 30 to anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 (cough, difficulty breathing and fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain). Individuals tested must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. Everybody being tested must be able to administer the test to themselves. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    The testing site is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at the Colorado State Fairgrounds, 1001 Beulah Avenue (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue).

    Symptomatic Individuals Encouraged to do Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment launched a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in each area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “do you have symptoms?” webpage  on the COVID-19 website.

     

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the Pueblo community and our most vulnerable in Pueblo by: 

    • Follow Governor's Safer at Home order
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.  Contact your health care provider.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you are sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday 719-583-4444.

    At times, the Pueblo COVID-9 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    05/05: Pueblo Cases

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Health and Environment announced today five new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County. The new confirmed positive cases are one-year-old female, 42-year-old female, 45-year-old female, 46-year-old female and a 54-year-old female.

    Pueblo County now has a total of 163 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. There have been 1,771 tests administered in Pueblo County.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Pueblo County’s 163 COVID-19 Confirmed Positive and Probable Cases
    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       4
    10-19   2
    20-29   23       
    30-39   16
    40-49   29
    50-59   29
    60-69   21
    70-79   13
    80+      17

    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female  90       
    Male      62                   

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   4
    30-39   1
    40-49   2
    50-59   2
    60-69   1
    70-79   0
    80+      1

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female          7
    Male              1
    Unavailable   3

    Pueblo County’s 11 COVID-19 Deaths

    Death in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   1
    60-69   2         
    70-79   1
    80+      7

    Colorado Department of Education Releases Graduation Guidance

    The Colorado Department of Education announced today guidelines for graduation ceremonies when distancing restrictions are in place. CDE has stated traditional graduation ceremonies are not safe at this time as gatherings of larger than 10 individuals are not permitted under the Safer-at-Home order. CDE also released restrictions for public gatherings as people plan for ways to honor graduates and provided ideas for alternatives to typical graduation ceremonies. This information can be found at https://www.cde.state.co.us/postsecondary/graduation-ceremonyguidance

    Camping at State Parks and Wildlife Areas to Remain Closed

    Colorado Parks and Wildlife announced today camping at state parks and wildlife areas will remain closed until further notice as CPW officials work to implement system-wide safety protocols regarding social distancing. No date has been set when the sites will reopen.  CPW is working with federal and local municipal partners and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment to determine a timeline for camping.

    State Park Rangers remain on duty protecting the parks and regular rules and regulations continue to be enforced. Park trail closures due to visitation or crowding will be reported on the Colorado Trail Explorer (COTREX) App and the CPW website.

    Counties, municipalities and land management agencies continue to update guidance including travel restrictions, road closures and access limitations on the Colorado Counties Inc. Safer-At-Home map.

    Residents are urged to respect safer-at-home orders and stay close to home and use local trails and parks. CPW also encourages park visitors to follow trail safety etiquette and visit parks responsibly. For more information on park closures, permits, licenses and outdoor recreation policies visit COVID-19 Response website

    Colorado Opportunity Scholarship Initiative Releases $1.5 million to Support Displaced Workers

    The Colorado Opportunity Scholarship Initiative announced today that $750,000 in grants will be made available annually to help workers displaced by COVID-19 enroll in certification and degree programs that align with Colorado Top Jobs so they can complete their credentials within the next two years.

    Public higher education institutions, community partners and workforce centers are encouraged to apply for the funds though a request for proposal grant process. Interested applicants can review grant eligibility and application materials.

    Pueblo County Holding Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Until May 30 at State Fairgrounds               

    Pueblo County is opened a drive-thru testing site in Pueblo through May 30 to anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 (cough, difficulty breathing and fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain). Individuals tested must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    The testing site is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at the Colorado State Fairgrounds, 1001 Beulah Avenue (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue).

    District 70 Meets Remotely Tonight

    Pueblo School District 70 will hold its Tuesday night board meeting remotely with live-streaming and public comment available. The meeting will be from 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. and will be live-streamed on the District 70 YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0X3-WmRaMW3iAhrFvHjcDg.

    Symptomatic Individuals Encouraged to do Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment launched a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in a given area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “do you have symptoms?” webpage  on the COVID-19 website.

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the Pueblo community and our most vulnerable in Pueblo by: 

    • Follow Governor's Safer at Home order
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.  Contact your health care provider.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you’re sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday 719-583-4444.

    At times the Pueblo COVID-9 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    05/04: Pueblo Deaths

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Health and Environment announced today one death of Pueblo County resident related to COVID-19 bringing the total number of Pueblo County deaths to 11. A 90-year-old female, who was reported as a previous positive case of Pueblo County has passed away from the virus. Public health officials also announced no new cases today.

    Pueblo County now has a total of 158 confirmed positive and *probable cases among Pueblo County residents. There have been 1,744 tests administered in Pueblo County.

    Over the weekend, public health officials announced 8 new positive cases of COVID-19 in Pueblo County. The confirmed positive cases are a 54-year-old female, 57-year-old female, 73-year-old female, 21-year-old male, 24-year-old male, 39-year-old male, 49-year-old male, and a 52-year-old male.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Pueblo County’s 158 COVID-19 Confirmed Positive and Probable Cases
    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       3
    10-19   2
    20-29   23       
    30-39   16
    40-49   26
    50-59   28
    60-69   21
    70-79   13
    80+      17

    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female  85       
    Male      62

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   4
    30-39   1
    40-49   2
    50-59   2
    60-69   1
    70-79   0
    80+      1

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female          7
    Male              1
    Unavailable   3

    Pueblo County’s 11 COVID-19 Deaths

    Death in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   1
    60-69   2         
    70-79   1
    80+ 7

    Pueblo West Metro District Facilities Remain Closed Due to COVID-19 Pandemic

    The Pueblo Metro District announced today outdoor swimming pools will not open this summer. The announcement was part of announcement of facilities that will remain closed until further notice due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The metro district continues to conduct business as usual and all essential workers are following guidelines including wearing masks.

    Locations that continue to be closed are:

    • Metro District Main Office, 781 E. Industrial Blvd.
    • Parks and Recreation Department, 340 E. Hahns Peak Avenue
    • Water Department, 20 W. Palmer Lake

    Parks and Recreation closures and delayed openings:

    • Outdoor swimming pool will not open this summer
    • Splash park will not open this summer
    • Skateboard park remains closed until further notice
    • Playgrounds and restroom facilities remain closed until further notice
    • Dog park remains closed until further notice
    • Pavilions at all parks remain closed until further notice
    • Recreation building remains closed until further notice
    • Ballfields remain closed until further notice
    • All summer programs have been canceled through July
    • Youth and adult sports programs are canceled through July
    • Tennis courts are tentatively scheduled to open June 1, following protocols
    • Frisbee golf course tentatively scheduled to open June 1 following protocols

    All parks are open to the public but all visitors in the park should adhere to social distancing guidelines, no gatherings of more than 10 people at this time and are encouraged to wear masks around other people.

    Pueblo County Holding Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Until May 30 at State Fairgrounds               

    Pueblo County is opened a drive-thru testing site in Pueblo through May 30 to anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 (cough, difficulty breathing and fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain). Individuals tested must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    The testing site is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at the Colorado State Fairgrounds, 1001 Beulah Avenue (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue).

    District 70 Meets Remotely Tuesday Night

    Pueblo School District 70 will hold its Tuesday night board meeting remotely with live-streaming and public comment available. The meeting will be from 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. and will be live-streamed on the District 70 YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0X3-WmRaMW3iAhrFvHjcDg.The public can submit written or video-recorded request if they wish to address the board. The requests must be emailed on or before noon Tuesday, May 5 to Pam Smith at pasmith@district70.org. Video statements should be no longer than 3 minutes and can be emailed as mp4 or .mov file. The final determination as to whether an item will appear on the board agenda will be at the discretion of the Superintendent and Board of Education president. Agenda is available on the District's website at www.district70.org.

    Symptomatic Individuals Encouraged to do Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment launched a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in a given area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “do you have symptoms?” webpage  on the COVID-19 website.

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the Pueblo community and our most vulnerable in Pueblo by: 

    • Follow Governor's Safer at Home order
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.  Contact your health care provider.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you’re sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday 719-583-4444.

    At times the Pueblo COVID-9 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    05/01: Pueblo Cases

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Health and Environment announced today five new positive and one probable* COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County. The new confirmed positive cases are a 39-year-old male, 42-year-old male, 43-year-old male, 18-year-old female and a 37-year-old male. The probable case is a 27-year-old female.

    Pueblo County now has a total of 150 confirmed positive and probable cases among Pueblo County residents. There have been 1,698 tests administered in Pueblo County. To date, 10 Pueblo County residents have passed away.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Pueblo County’s 150 COVID-19 Confirmed Positive and Probable Cases
    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       3
    10-19   2
    20-29   21       
    30-39   15
    40-49   25
    50-59   25
    60-69   21
    70-79   12
    80+      17

    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female   82
    Male       57        

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   4
    30-39   1
    40-49   2
    50-59   2
    60-69   1
    70-79   0
    80+      1

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female           7
    Male               1
    Unavailable    3

    Pueblo County’s 10 COVID-19 Deaths

    Death in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   1
    60-69   2         
    70-79   1
    80+      6         

    Pueblo Parks and Recreation Creates Safe Recovery Plan to Reopen Facilities

    The Pueblo Parks and Recreation announced plans to re-open facilities under the current Safer-at-Home order issued by Governor Jared Polis. The plan, which is effective today (May 1), allows for the opening of the disc golf course, horseshoe pits and bocce ball court and the skate park. These facilities are limited to groups of 10 people or smaller. The plan outlines specific guidelines for each facility. To review the guidelines go to the Parks and Recreation website at www.pueblo.us/27/Your-Government

    The following facilities remain closed: the dog park, El Centro del Quinto Sol Recreation Center, Pueblo Ice Arena, swimming pools, City Park rides, playgrounds, outdoor exercise equipment, park shelters, ball fields, concessions and youth and adult sports programs.

    Contracted facilities that are open to the public but have strict guidelines are the Nature and Wildlife Discovery Center at Pueblo Mountain Park Campus and the River Campus and Raptor Center. To see the guidelines,to the Parks and Recreation Center website. Facilities still closed are the Pueblo Art Guild, Pueblo Municipal Shooters (City Park), Pueblo Motorsports Park, Honors Speedway.

    Parks and Recreation officials continue to work with the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment to establish re-opening guidelines for the Pueblo Zoo.

    Schedule of Unified Messaging Pueblo COVID-19 Updates to Change

    The Unified Messaging Pueblo COVID-19 updates distributed at 4 p.m. daily will change beginning today. The report will be distributed Monday through Friday, beginning Friday, May 1. The updates from the weekend will be featured in the Monday’s report.

    Mayor Gradisar Discusses COVID-19 With Public Health Officials on Weekly Address

    Mayor Nick Gradisar discussed updates on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in Pueblo and guidelines to the state’s Safer-at-Home order with Pueblo Department of Public Health Director Randy Evetts and Aaron Martinez, program manager for PDPHE. To see the mayor’s address, go to https://youtu.be/rQyWkT_4q9o

    Governor Polis Signs Several Executive Orders in Response to COVID-19 Pandemic

    Governor Jared Polis signed several executive orders related to the COVID-19 pandemic. A couple of the orders are new, and few others are extension of previous orders issued. The new orders signed by the governor are:

    • Restrictions to spending for the current fiscal year to end on June 30. Read the order
    • Providing additional funding to nursing homes and other congregate care facilities in response to COVID-19. Read the order Executive Order D 2020 054
    • Extending the date unaffiliated candidates can begin collecting signatures. Read the order Executive Order D 2020 053,

    The orders extended by the governor are:

    CDOT and Department of Natural Resources Reminding People to Stay Local, Limit Travel this Weekend

    With warmer temperatures forecast for the weekend, the Colorado Department of Transportation and Department of Natural Resources are reminding people to stay within 10 miles of home when out recreating. Under the Safer-at-Home order residents are still urged to stay home and continue to avoid unnecessary travel and visiting mountain communities.

    Colorado Parks and Wildlife Campgrounds Closed Until at Least Monday, May 4

    The Colorado Parks and Wildlife is extending closure of all campgrounds and camping facilities (including yurts and cabins) through May 4 at all Colorado State Parks and state wildlife areas. The closure can be extended further if needed.

    State Launches Safer-at-Home Information Website

    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment unveiled a Safer-at-Home website with information that outlines guidance on the public health order released earlier this week. The comprehensive site includes guidance for worksites, employees and the public as they transition from Stay-at-Home to the Safer-at-Home phase. To view the website, go to covid19.colorado.gov/safer-at-home

    Symptomatic Individuals Encouraged to do Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment launched a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in a given area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “do you have symptoms?” webpage  on the COVID-19 website.

    Pueblo County Holding Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Until May 30 at State Fairgrounds

    Pueblo County is opened a drive-thru testing site in Pueblo through May 30 to anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 (cough, difficulty breathing and fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain). Individuals tested must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    The testing site is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at the Colorado State Fairgrounds, 1001 Beulah Avenue (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue).

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the Pueblo community and our most vulnerable in Pueblo by: 

    • Follow Governor's Safer at Home order
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.  Contact your health care provider.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you’re sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday 719-583-4444.

    At times the Pueblo COVID-9 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    04/30: Pueblo Cases

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Health and Environment announced today eight new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County. The new confirmed positive cases are a 35-year-old male, 28-year-old female, 50-year-old female, 43-year-old female, 52-year-old female, 64-year-old male, 53-year-old male and 42-year-old female.

    Pueblo County now has a total of 144 confirmed positive and probable* cases among Pueblo County residents. There have been 869 tests administered in Pueblo County. To date, 10 Pueblo County residents have passed away.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    Pueblo County’s 144 COVID-19 Confirmed Positive and Probable Cases
    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       3
    10-19   1
    20-29   20
    30-39   13
    40-49   23
    50-59   25
    60-69   21
    70-79   12
    80+      17

    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female  81
    Male      53            

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   3
    30-39   1
    40-49   2
    50-59   2
    60-69   1
    70-79   0
    80+      1

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female           6
    Male               1
    Unavailable    3

    Pueblo County’s 10 COVID-19 Deaths

    Death in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   1
    60-69   2
    70-79   1
    80+      6

    Mayor Gradisar to Discuss Safer-at-Home at Friday’s Community Connections

    Mayor Nick Gradisar to discuss the Safer-at-Home executive order during his weekly Community Connections session on Friday. Randy Evetts, public health director for the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment will join Gradisar in the discussion. Community Connections will air live on Comcast government access channel 17 at 9 a.m. It will also be streamed live on the mayor’s and the City of Pueblo Facebook pages. Questions can be submitted to the mayor prior to the program at mayor@pueblo.us.

    Pueblo Library District Begins Curbside Pickup, Reopens Book Drop Boxes

    All Pueblo Library District buildings remained closed but beginning Monday, May 4, the library district will start offering curbside pickup and mail service delivery of library materials. The outdoor book drop boxes at all library branches also will open beginning Monday. The library locations are Barkman, 1300 Jerry Murphy Rd.; Greenhorn Valley, 4801 Cibola Dr., Colorado City; Tom L. & Anna Marie Giodone, 24655 U.S. Highway 50E; Lamb, 2525 S. Pueblo Blvd; Patrick A. Lucero, 1315 E. Seventh St. and Robert Hoag Rawlings, 100 E. Abriendo Ave. The Library @ the Y will reopen when the YMCA opens.

    Patrons can check out new materials by placing them on hold through the district’s online catalog at www.catalog.pueblolibrary.org and request curbside pickup. The service is available during normal business hours, up to 30 minutes before closing. Returns will not be accepted at the curbside pickup. All returned material must be deposited in the book drops. Patrons who do not want to leave their home to pick up materials can receive items by mail. When placing a hold in the library catalog choose mail delivery as the pickup location. Items will be mailed to the patron’s home. Items can be returned by mail or any library district book drop.

    Colorado Parks and Wildlife Campgrounds Closed Until at Least Monday, May 4

    The Colorado Parks and Wildlife is extending closure of all campgrounds and camping facilities (including yurts and cabins) through May 4 at all Colorado State Parks and state wildlife areas. The closure can be extended further if needed.

    State Launches Safer-at-Home Information Website

    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment unveiled a Safer-at-Home website with information that outlines guidance on the public health order released earlier this week. The comprehensive site includes guidance for worksites, employees and the public as they transition from Stay-at-Home to the Safer-at-Home phase. To view the website go to covid19.colorado.gov/safer-at-home

    Symptomatic Individuals Encouraged to do Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment launched a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in a given area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “do you have symptoms?” webpage  on the COVID-19 website.

    Pueblo County Holding Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Site Until May 30 at State Fairgrounds

    Pueblo County is opened a drive-thru testing site in Pueblo through May 30 to anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 (cough, difficulty breathing and fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain). Individuals tested must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    The testing site is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at the Colorado State Fairgrounds, 1001 Beulah Avenue (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue).

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19
    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the Pueblo community and our most vulnerable in Pueblo by: 

    • Follow Governor's Safer at Home order
    • Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.  Contact your health care provider.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you’re sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 9AM – 4PM, Monday – Friday 719-583-4444.

    At times the Pueblo COVID-9 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will be with you.

  •  

    04/28: Confirmed Cases

    Pueblo County’s 135 COVID-19 Confirmed Positive and Probable Cases

    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Age Group

    Age Cases

    Group

    0-9       3

    10-19   1

    20-29   19

    30-39   11

    40-49   21

    50-59   22

    60-69   20

    70-79   12

    80+      17

     

    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Sex

    Female            76

    Male               49

     

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Age Group

    Age Cases

    Group

    0-9       0

    10-19   0

    20-29   3

    30-39   1

    40-49   2

    50-59   2

    60-69   1

    70-79   0

    80+      1

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex

    Female            6

    Male               1

    Unavailable     3

     

    Pueblo County’s 9 COVID-19 Deaths

    Death in Pueblo by Age Group

    Age Cases

    Group

    0-9       0

    10-19   0

    20-29   0

    30-39   0

    40-49   0

    50-59   1 

    60-69   2          

    70-79   1

    80+      5

    Pueblo County Holding Drive-Up Testing Site Until May 30 at State Fairgrounds

    Pueblo County is opened a drive-up testing site in Pueblo through May 30 to anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 (cough, difficulty breathing and fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain). Individuals tested must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    The testing site is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday through May 30 at the Colorado State Fairgrounds, 1001 Beulah Avenue (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue).

    Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline Changes Hours of Operation Beginning Wednesday, April 29

    The Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline established last month to answer questions from the public regarding the COVID-19 pandemic is changing hours of operation beginning Wednesday, April 29. The hotline will be open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at (719) 583-4444. At times the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will take the call.

    Catholic Charities Hosting Food and Supply Distribution on Wednesday

    Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Pueblo will be hosting a food/diaper distribution beginning at Noon Wednesday, April 29 at 229 Michigan Street. The distribution will be held until supplies are out.

    State Launches Safer-at-Home Information Website

    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment unveiled a Safer-at-Home website with information that outlines guidance on the public health order released earlier this week. The comprehensive site includes guidance for worksites, employees and the public as they transition from Stay-at-Home to the Safer-at-Home phase. To view the website go to https://covid19.colorado.gov/safer-at-home

    State Receives $10.3 Million in Federal Funding for Epidemiological Work and Lab Testing

    Colorado has received $10.3 million from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to provide additional funding for epidemiological work and lab testing in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The funding is part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act.. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will be providing further guidance on specific spending parameters.

    St. Mary Corwin Amends Visitor Restrictions

    Centura Health announced today a modification to visitor restrictions at all its care locations, including St. Mary Corwin Medical Center. Patients are now allowed to have one visitor per day. All visitors must check in at the front desk or the emergency room. Visitors are required to wear self-provided face coverings while inside the facility and will screened, including for body temperature. Any visitor with a temperature of 100 degrees or higher will not be permitted in the facility.

    2020 Census Deadline Extended Until October, Residents Encouraged to Take Survey

    The 2020 Census deadline has been extended until October due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Residents are urged to take the Census Survey at www.my2020census.gov. The survey takes about 10 minutes. The survey can also be done by phone or by mail. All personal information is kept confidential by law.

    Colorado State Patrol Lifts Statewide Accident Alert

    The Colorado State Patrol announced Monday the accident alert is no longer in effect and anyone involved in a crash must report it to law enforcement. The CSP went on accident alert statewide March 25 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Symptomatic Individuals Encouraged to do Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey 

    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment launched a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in a given area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “do you have symptoms?” webpage  on the COVID-19 website.

  •  

    04/27: Pueblo Cases

    April 27, 2020        

    4:00 p.m. Update Pueblo, CO #PuebloCOVID19 

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Health and Environment announced today one new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County. The new confirmed positive cases is a 54-year-old female.

    Pueblo County now has a total of 133 confirmed positive and probable cases among Pueblo County residents. Twelve additional positive cases are from individuals residing in other counties (one from Alamosa, one from Crowley County, one Custer, one from Huerfano County, one from Douglas County, two from Fremont County, one from Rio Grande, one from Prowers). There have been 820 tests administered in Pueblo County. There have been 659** negative results with 16 test results still pending, and three tests unable to be read and determined unsatisfactory. To date, nine Pueblo County residents have passed away.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    **(Negative test results reflect only those reported by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and do not include those negatives results from tests administered through private labs).

    Pueblo County’s 133 COVID-19 Confirmed Positive and Probable Cases

    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       3
    10-19   1
    20-29   19
    30-39   11
    40-49   20
    50-59   22
    60-69   20
    70-79   12
    80+      16

    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female           76
    Male               48

     

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   3
    30-39   1
    40-49   1
    50-59   2
    60-69   1
    70-79   0
    80+      1

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female            5         
    Male               1
    Unavailable     3

     

    Pueblo County’s 9 COVID-19 Deaths

    Death in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   1
    60-69   2         
    70-79   1
    80+      5

    Pueblo County Holding Drive-Up Testing Site Until May 30 at State Fairgrounds

    Pueblo County is opened a drive-up testing site in Pueblo through May 30 to anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 (cough, difficulty breathing and fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain). Individuals tested must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    The testing site is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday through May 30 at the Colorado State Fairgrounds, 1001 Beulah Avenue (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue).

    Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline Changes Hours of Operation Beginning Wednesday, April 29

    The Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline established last month to answer questions from the public regarding the COVID-19 pandemic is changing hours of operation beginning Wednesday, April 29. The hotline will be open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at (719) 583-4444. At times the Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline may experience a high volume of calls, please be patient and remain on the line and the next available call taker will take the call.

    St. Mary Corwin Amends Visitor Restrictions

    Centura Health announced today a modification to visitor restrictions at all its care locations, including St. Mary Corwin Medical Center. Patients are now allowed to have one visitor per day. All visitors must check in at the front desk or the emergency room. Visitors are required to wear self-provided face coverings while inside the facility and will screened, including for body temperature. Any visitor with a temperature of 100 degrees or higher will not be permitted in the facility.

    City Council Meeting Conducted Through Zoom

    The Pueblo City Council is holding its regular meeting tonight at 7 p.m. via Zoom video conferencing which will allow for remote access. Mayor Nick Gradisar is urging anyone interested in the meeting to stay at home and watch it on Comcast government access channel 17, on the city’s Facebook page or on the live stream atwww.pueblo.us. Those who want to attend the meeting in person will be required to have their temperature check prior to entering the City Council Chambers. Public comment will be allowed and individuals wishing to speak in person must sign up beginning at 5:30 p.m. in Council Chambers. Anyone wanting to speak through the online format must call 719-225-3897 to sign up via Zoom. Sign-up will be from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Instructions for Zoom video conferencing are available at  www.pueblo.us/86.

    2020 Census Deadline Extended Until October, Residents Encouraged to Take Survey

    The 2020 Census deadline has been extended until October due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Residents are urged to take the Census Survey at www.my2020census.gov. The survey takes about 10 minutes. The survey can also be done by phone or by mail. All personal information is kept confidential by law.

    Colorado State Patrol Lifts Statewide Accident Alert

    The Colorado State Patrol announced Monday the accident alert is no longer in effect and anyone involved in a crash must report it to law enforcement. The CSP went on accident alert statewide March 25 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Governor Releases Safer-at-Home Executive Order

    Governor Jared Polis released the Safer-at-Home executive order that outlines changes that allow for a more sustainable way of living while slowing the spread of the COVID-19 virus and allowing more residents to return to work. The changes happening during Safer-at-Home go into effect today, May 1 and May 4.  The goal of Safer-at-Home is to maintain 60% to 65% social distancing and vulnerable residents should continue to stay at home. The order is effective April 27 and is tentatively set to expire in 30 days. Read the Safer-at-Home Order here.

    Governor Signs Executive Order Allowing Medical, Dental, Veterinary Elective Procedures

    Governor Jared Polis signed an executive order that is effective April 27 allowing for medical, dental and veterinary voluntary elective surgeries to resume as long as the health care facility or other setting is following the required safety protocols. The order requires facilities performing the procedures to establish a plan to reduce or stop voluntary or elective surgeries and procedures if there is a surge of COVID-19 infections in the county. Read the executive order here.

    Governor Polis Creates New Normal Advisory Board

    Governor Jared Polis established a New Normal Advisory board to advise him and Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment on coordinating polices and rules designed to maximize social distancing during the Safer-at-Home phase. The board will focus on how local jurisdictions and local public health agencies coordinate with the state on public education efforts that aim to maximize compliance and enforcement during the COVID-19 pandemic. Read the order here.

    Colorado Joins Pact with Western States on Modifying Stay-at-Home and Fighting COVID-19

    Governor Jared Polis announced today Colorado has joined the Western States Pact, a working group of governors with a shared vision for modifying stay at home and fighting COVID-19. The other states in the pact are Nevada, California, Oregon and Washington. The shared principles to the agreement are: Our residents’ health comes first; health outcomes and science, not politics, will guide decisions and states will only be effective by working together.

    Symptomatic Individuals Encouraged to do Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment launched a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in a given area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “do you have symptoms?” webpage  on the COVID-19 website.

  •  

    04/24: Testing Site

    “Plenty of COVID-19 Tests Available at Pueblo Drive-Up Testing Site”
    Pueblo, CO #PuebloCOVID19 

    Pueblo, CO –  More than 260 people were tested for the COVID-19 virus during the first two days of the free drive-up testing site at the Colorado State Fairgrounds.  

    On April 22, the opening day of the test site, there were 140 people who took the self-administered test to determine if they have COVID-19. Another 124 people were tested on April 23.  

    “Based on the number of people who were tested during the first two days our site was open is a strong indication that we have many people in our community who are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms,” said Randy Evetts, public health director for the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment. “The reality is that there are likely many more people who have the virus. For anyone who has symptoms, we encourage them to get tested. We have plenty of test kits available.” 

    Evetts added the community benefits from having tests available by giving residents the opportunity to find out if they are positive for COVID-19 and public health also gains information of how widespread the virus is in Pueblo. Understanding the level of infection in our community informs decision making for opening the community. 

    The drive-up testing site is open form 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. weekly on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday through the end of May at the Colorado State Fairgrounds (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue).  

    To be tested, individuals must have symptoms of COVID-19. Common symptoms are cough, difficulty breathing, fever over 100.4, chills, headache, muscle pain and sore throat. Testing is free and open to anyone in Pueblo County and surrounding counties. Individuals tested must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups, motorcycles or bicycles are allowed through the testing site. The tests are self-administered in an enclosed vehicle. To see a video of the process go to  https://youtu.be/vsQVxsQY3jc  

     

  •  

    04/24: Pueblo Cases

    April 24, 2020        

    4:00 p.m. Update Pueblo, CO #PuebloCOVID19 

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Health and Environment announced aninth death of a Pueblo County resident related to COVID-19. A 68-year-old female who was reported as a probable case in Pueblo County, has passed away from the virus. Public health officials also announced today five new positive COVID-19 cases and the one probable* case in Pueblo County. The new confirmed positive cases are a 23-year-old female, 60-year-old female, 65-year-old female, 56-year-old male and 29-year-old male. The one probable case is the 68-year-old female reported death.

    Pueblo County now has a total of 120 confirmed positive and probable cases among Pueblo County residents. Twelve additional positive cases are from individuals residing in other counties (one from Alamosa, one from Crowley County, one from Huerfano County, one from Douglas County, two from Fremont County, one from Rio Grande, one from Prowers, one from Custer County, one from Logan County, one from Denver county, and one from the Tri-County area). There have been 756 tests administered in Pueblo County. There have been 624** negative results with 0 test results still pending, and three tests unable to be read and determined unsatisfactory. To date, nine Pueblo County residents have passed away.

    *A probable case meets the clinical criteria and epidemiological evidence, yet it has not been laboratory confirmed with a test. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is now reporting probable cases across the state.

    **(Negative test results reflect only those reported by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and do not include those negatives results from tests administered through private labs).

    Pueblo County’s 120 COVID-19 Confirmed Positive and Probable Cases

    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       3
    10-19   1
    20-29   16
    30-39   10
    40-49   19
    50-59   18
    60-69   17
    70-79   11
    80+      16

    Confirmed Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female            69
    Male               42

     

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   3
    30-39   1
    40-49   1
    50-59   2
    60-69   1
    70-79   0
    80+      1

    Probable Cases in Pueblo by Sex
    Female            5         
    Male               1
    Unavailable     3

     

    Pueblo County’s 9 COVID-19 Deaths

    Death in Pueblo by Age Group
    Age Cases
    Group

    0-9       0
    10-19   0
    20-29   0
    30-39   0
    40-49   0
    50-59   1
    60-69   2         
    70-79   1
    80+      5

    Pueblo County Holding Drive-Up Testing Site Until May 30 at State Fairgrounds

    Pueblo County is opened a drive-up testing site in Pueblo through May 30 to anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 (cough, difficulty breathing and fever over 100.4 degrees, chills, headache, sore throat and muscle pain). Individuals tested must be inside an enclosed vehicle for safety. No walk-ups or motorcycles are allowed through the testing site. The site is open to neighboring counties. The first 250 individuals each day will have access to drive up testing. No physician order is required, and all testing is free.

    The testing site is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday through May 30 at the Colorado State Fairgrounds, 1001 Beulah Avenue (enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue).

    Mayor Gradisar Discusses Safer-at-Home, Local COVID-19 Testing on Weekly Address

    Mayor Nick Gradisar discussed several local topics related to the COVID-19 pandemic during his weekly address on Friday. Gradisar talked about Safer-at-Home guidelines, re-opening business, the local testing site at the Colorado State Fairgrounds. To see the Mayor’s address, go tohttps://youtu.be/bOrSbP88Z0I?t=49

    Pueblo Water Offers Guidelines for Refreshing, Maintaining Water Quality in Buildings Closed During Stay-at-Home Order

    Pueblo Water is offering guidelines for homes, businesses and buildings that have been shuttered during the Stay-at-Home order. Pueblo Water recommends flushing pipes to maintain or restore water quality. For more information on how to flush pipes for homes and businesses go to https://pueblowater.org/flush-pipes-to-maintain-or-restore-water-quality/

    Supporting Pueblo Community Marketplace Open

    A marketplace featuring local products and businesses launched a new websitesupportingpueblo.com to help support local businesses. The website provides a list of local restaurants and businesses that offer curbside pick-up and online shopping and delivery. It also allows for the public to shop local favorites from a single online site and have the items available for pick up or delivery.

    District 70 Resumes Lunch Program Monday, April 27

    District 70 will resume its Grab-N-Go lunch program on Monday, April 27 at 12 locations. Any student under the age of 19 will receive two free lunches and two breakfasts with each meal bag. Parents/Guardians can purchase a meal bag for $6 at the curbside pick-up locations only. Adults over the age of 60 can receive a free meal if picking up food for grandchildren.

    Curbside pickup for meals is available from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday and Wednesday at:

    • Pueblo County High School (bus loop in back) 1050 35th Lane (this was relocated from Vineland Middle School)
    • Liberty Point Middle School, 484, S. Maher, Pueblo West
    • Skyview Middle School, 1047 Camino de Bravo, Pueblo West

    Grab-N-Go meals will be delivered from 11 a.m. to Noon via First Student School buses at the following locations: (Meals are available on first-come, first-served basis while supplies last. No adult meals are served).

    • Craver Middle School, 4850 Crow Cut Off Road, Colorado City
    • Beulah School, 8734 School House Lane, Beulah
    • Avondale Elementary, 213 U.S. 50, Avondale
    • Pleasant View Middle, 23600 Everett Road
    • Oakwood Estates Mobile Home Park off U.S. 50/96 near the Pueblo Airport
    • Stonegate Village Apartments, 393 E. Spaulding Ave, Pueblo West
    • Pueblo West Campground, 480 E. McCulloch Blvd., Pueblo West
    • Memorial Recreation Center, near E. George Drive, Pueblo West
    • Liberty Point Mobile Home Park at Dawnview Dr.

    National Prescription Drug Take Back Event Scheduled for April 25 Postponed

    The spring National Prescription Drug Take Back Event, sponsored by the Drug Enforcement Administration in cooperation with local law enforcement agencies, scheduled for Saturday, April 25 has been postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The event allows the public to safely dispose any unused, unwanted or outdated prescription medications at designated locations in the community. Once the health crisis has receded and national emergency guidelines have been lifted, the DEA will work to reschedule the event. Pueblo County offers free year-round medication disposal at several sites. To find the sites and hours go tohttps://county.pueblo.org/public-health/recycling

    State Health Department Launches Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey
    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment launched a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in a given area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “do you have symptoms?” webpage  on the COVID-19 website.

  •  

    04/20: Drive-Up Testing Site

    Pueblo County to Operate Drive-up Testing Site for COVID-19

    April 20, 2020 Pueblo, CO - Pueblo County will open a drive-up testing site in Pueblo from Wednesday, April 22 through May 30 to test certain qualifying members of the public who have symptoms of COVID-19 (cough, difficulty breathing, and fever over 100.4). This testing site will be open to healthcare workers, first responders, individuals 65 years of age and older and critical infrastructure workers who have symptoms. The testing site is open to neighboring counties. No physician order is required.

    Drive-up testing site details:

    • Time: 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. weekly on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday
    • Location: Colorado State Fair Grounds, 1001 Beulah Avenue, enter through Gate 4 off Mesa Avenue and Gaylord Avenue
    • Cost: All testing will be free. Insurance will not be required.

    “This is a great thing for our community,” exclaimed Randy Evetts, public health director of the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment. Evetts added, “in addition to letting community members know if they are positive with the COVID-19 virus public health will gain information of how widespread the virus is in Pueblo. Understanding the level of infection in our community informs our decision making for opening up the community.”

    Information Details

    • The first 250 individuals daily in the line will have access to the drive-up testing. All others that arrived after that will be encouraged to seek testing from a private provider or attend the next day. Individuals should contact their primary care provider before to determine if they have need to be tested.

    ·  Who can be tested: You must have symptoms or have had contact with someone who has COVID-19 in order to be tested. Healthcare workers, first responders, individuals 65 years of age and older and critical infrastructure workers who have symptoms who wishes to get tested will go through a brief screening to determine if they qualify. No prescription required, but you must be experiencing COVID-19 symptoms and bring your ID and organization ID, if applicable.

    Other important information for you to know:

    ·       If you have a medical emergency, call 911- do not report to the testing site, as it is not a care facility. If you have severe respiratory symptoms, especially shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, tell the dispatcher about your symptoms. Do not wait for a COVID-19 test to call 911.

    ·       If you are ill or suspect that you were exposed, but are not able to be immediately tested, please stay home, self-isolate, and contact your physician.

    ·       For the safety of drive-up lab workers, hours of operation will be contingent upon safe weather. We will announce if we need to close the site due to unsafe conditions. Unsafe conditions include any weather that can make personal protection equipment ineffective, such as any precipitation, wind, or colder temperatures.

    ·       While waiting for their test results, individuals should stay at home. Those who receive positive test results may be issued isolation orders. Depending on test volume, we aim to contact individuals directly with their results.

    View Colorado’s information about COVID-19 testing https://covid19.colorado.gov/testing-covid-19.

    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the Pueblo community and our most vulnerable in Pueblo by:   

    ·        Follow Governor's Stay At Home order to stay at home through April 26, 2020. 

    ·        Wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities. 

    ·        Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.  

    ·        Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them.  

    ·        Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.    

    ·        Wash your hands with soap regularly.   

    ·        Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.   

    ·        Stay home when you’re sick.   

    ·        Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.   

    ·        Avoid close contact with sick people.   

    ·        Clean surfaces frequently touched.   

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:   

    ·    www.puebloemergency.info  

    ·    Pueblo’s COVID-19 Hotline 719-583-4444  

     

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information CenterPueblo COVID-19 Hotline is providing resources and answering questions 8AM – 5PM, Monday – Friday 719-583-4444

  •  

    04/20: Facemask Order

    “Workers at Critical Businesses/Government Functions Ordered to Wear Facemasks” 

    Pueblo, CO – Local public health officials are requesting that all workers in critical businesses and government functions follow Governor Jared Polis’ order to wear face masks while at work and serving the public.

    On Friday, Governor Polis issued an executive order requiring all critical workers, including government functions, to wear non-medical cloth face coverings while at work. The order was issued to help slow the spread of COVID-19 and to facilitate re-opening the economy.

    “While this is something we will enforce, we are hoping for voluntary compliance from all of our essential workers for the safety and the health of the Pueblo Community,” said Randy Evetts, public health director of the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment.

    Employees in critical businesses and government functions must wear a cloth non-medical face masks that cover the nose and mouth while working and, to the extent possible, wear gloves when in contact with customers or goods, if gloves are provided by the employer.

    Surgical or medical face masks can be worn if a more protective face covering is required because of the nature of the work performed. Otherwise, it is recommended individuals wear cloth masks and save the medical mask for healthcare providers and first responders.

    Science is showing some people may spread the virus when they do not have the symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The virus can be spread when people are speaking, coughing or sneezing. A face covering can help reduce the spread of large droplets and lower the risk of transmission of the virus by someone who may be sick and not realize it.

  •  

    04/20: Pueblo Cases

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Health and Environment announced today six new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County. The new cases are a 9-year-old male, 66-year-old male, 92-year-old male, 90-year-old female, 82-year-old male and a 48-year-old male.

    Pueblo County now has a total of 92 confirmed positive cases among Pueblo County residents. Eleven additional positive cases are from individuals residing in other counties (one from Alamosa, one from Crowley County, one from Huerfano County, one from Douglas County, two from Fremont County, one from Rio Grande, one from Prowers, one from Custer County, one from Logan County, and one from the Tri-County area). There have been 668 tests administered in Pueblo County. There have been 562* negative results with 2 tests results still pending, and three tests unable to be read and determined unsatisfactory. To date, seven Pueblo County residents have passed away.

    *(Negative test results reflect only those reported by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and do not include those negatives results from tests administered through private labs).

    Pueblo County’s 92 COVID-19 Confirmed Cases

    Cases in Pueblo by Age Group

    Age                  Cases

    Group

    0-9                   2

    10-19               1

    20-29               12                                

    30-39               10

    40-49               14

    50-59               16

    60-69               12                    

    70-79               11

    80+                  14                    

    Cases in Pueblo by Sex

    Female            54

    Male               38

    Pueblo County’s 7 COVID-19 Deaths

    Death in Pueblo by Age Group:

    Age                  Cases

    Group

    0-9                   0

    10-19               0                      

    20-29               0                                                          

    30-39               0

    40-49               0

    50-59               1 

    60-69               1                      

    70-79               0                      

    80+                  5                                 

    Community Marketplace Supporting Pueblo Launched

    A marketplace featuring local products and businesses has launched a new website supportingpueblo.com to help support local businesses. The website provides a list of local restaurants and businesses that offer curbside pick-up, online shopping and delivery. It also allows for the public to shop local favorites from a single online site and have the items available for pick up or delivery.

    St. Mary-Corwin Medical Center Providing iPad Use for COVID-19 Patients

    Centura Health, including St. Mary Corwin Medical Center, is providing iPads to COVID-19 patients hospitalized in their facilities as a way to enhance the healing process. The iPads and virtual meeting technology are being used to help COVID-19 isolated patients connect with loved ones. Every COVID-19 patient room will be equipped with the device.

    District 60 Hosting Virtual Community Forum/Town Hall on Design of East and Centennial High Schools

    District 60 is hosting a second virtual Community Forum/Town Hall on the new design of East and Centennial high schools Wednesday at 6 p.m. Architects from MOA Architects and HGF Architects are taking feedback from the community. Log on to the District 60 Vimeo channel, http://bit.ly/D60Video.

    Pueblo Latino Chamber Offers Online Resource Site for Business Community

    The Pueblo Latino Chamber of Commerce has a website  myemail.constantcontact.com/UPDATED-COVID-19--Federal---Colorado--Support-for-Small-Businesses.html?soid=1123123555194&aid=3r5gzV66hVo to offer resources for the local business community.

    State Enhances myColorado Mobile App to Help Residents Stay Current on COVID-19 Information

    The State has made enhancements to the myColorado mobile app to help residents be informed on current COVID-19 information and access food, cash, medical and early childhood assistance on the Colorado PEAK website. The enhancements also allow for the ability to display vehicle registrations in the app and chat with myColorado support staff. Download the myColorado from the Apple App Store or Google Ply.

    State Health Department Launches Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey 

    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment launched a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in a given area or region. The symptom tracker is on the “do you have symptoms?” webpage  on the COVID-19 website.

Misc

  •  

    05/01: Additional CARES Act Relief Funds

    Secretary DeVos Delivers Nearly $1.4 Billion in Additional CARES Act Relief Funds to HBCUs, Minority Serving Institutions, and Colleges and Universities Serving Low-Income Students

    WASHINGTON – U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced today that nearly $1.4 billion in additional funding will be directed to Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs), including Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs), as well as institutions serving low-income students to help ensure learning continues during the coronavirus national emergency. This funding is part of the Higher Education Emergency Relief (HEER) Fund authorized by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, signed into law by President Donald J. Trump less than five weeks ago.

    “This Administration is committed to the success of HBCUs, Minority Serving Institutions, and the students they serve. Each institution is unique and is an important part of this country’s educational fabric,” said Secretary DeVos. “By providing additional support to these important institutions, we can help ensure they emerge from this crisis stronger than before. I encourage these institutions, like all others, to use these funds to provide emergency grants to students during this challenging time, and to expand remote learning programs and build IT capacity. These are challenging times, but if we take this opportunity to transform higher education to meet the demands of the 21st century, our nation’s students and higher education as a whole will be better for it.”

    Institutions may use this funding to cover the cost of technology associated with a transition to distance education, grants to cover the costs of attendance for eligible students, and faculty and staff trainings. Additionally, funds may be used to cover operational costs, such as lost revenue, reimbursements for prior expenses, and payroll.

    These additional funding allocations to MSIs, including HBCUs and TCCUs, and institutions eligible for the Strengthening Institutions Program (SIP) represent 7.5 percent of overall HEER funds, or around $1 billion. This funding is provided on top of the primary HEER Fund allocation announced earlier in April. HBCUs, for example, will collectively receive an additional $577 million through the awards announced today. That amount is on top of the $353 million amount that the Department allocated to HBCUs through the HEER Fund earlier in the month. TCCUs will receive over $50 million in this round of HEER funding, bringing the total allocation to TCCUs under the fund to $65 million.

    The HEER Fund also sets aside 2.5 percent of the HEER Fund ($349 million) to address the greatest unmet needs related to the coronavirus, giving priority to schools that have not been allocated at least $500,000 from the fund. The Department is deploying these funds to ensure that every eligible public and private nonprofit institution will receive at least $500,000 in CARES Act relief funding.

    In order to access these funds, eligible institutions must sign a Certification and Agreement certifying that they will use their allocations in accordance with the CARES Act and all other applicable federal law. Schools have until Aug. 1, 2020, to apply for the funds. The Certification and Agreement, a cover letter, and the HEER Fund allocation tables by institution are available on the Office of Postsecondary Education’s CARES Act website.

    The Department has taken quick action to support higher education students from the start of the coronavirus outbreak. Colleges and universities were given immediate regulatory flexibility so students' educations could continue online. Under the leadership of President Trump, the Department also provided student loan relief to tens of millions of borrowers by setting all federally held student loan interest rates to zero percent and allowing borrowers to defer payments for 60 days without interest. The CARES Act extends those benefits to six months. The Department also stopped all federal wage garnishments and collections actions for borrowers with federally held loans in default. Additionally, the Department made $6.2 billion available for emergency cash grants for higher education students, followed by $6.2 billion allocated to higher education institutions to ensure learning continues. The Department also disbursed $7 million to Gallaudet University and $13 million to Howard University in accordance with the CARES Act, which allocated this funding to help these unique institutions address the challenges associated with the coronavirus.

    The Department continues to update www.ed.gov/coronavirus with information on COVID-19 for students, parents, educators and local leaders.

    For more information about COVID-19, please visit the following websites:
    coronavirus.govcdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html, and usa.gov/coronavirus.

  •  

    04/28: Student-Centered Learning

    Secretary DeVos Launches New Grant Competition to Spark Student-Centered, Agile Learning Opportunities to Support Recovery from National Emergency

    States can compete for more than $300 million to rethink education by creating flexible K-12 models, developing postsecondary tools that aid economic recovery

    WASHINGTON — U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced today more than $300 million in discretionary grant funds will be available for states to use to create adaptable, innovative learning opportunities for K-12 and postsecondary learners in response to the COVID-19 national emergency. The grants will be funded through the Education Stabilization Fund (ESF), authorized by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, signed into law by President Donald J. Trump.

    “If our ability to educate is limited to what takes place in any given physical building, we are never going to meet the unique needs of every student,” said Secretary DeVos. “The current disruption to the normal model is reaffirming something I have said for years: we must rethink education to better match the realities of the 21st century. This is the time for local education leaders to unleash their creativity and ingenuity, and I’m looking forward to seeing what they do to provide education freedom and economic opportunity for America’s students.” 

    The CARES Act provides $307.5 million for these discretionary grants, which the Department will divide between two competitions: $180 million for the Rethink K-12 School Models Grant and $127.5 million for the Reimagining Workforce Preparation Grant.  

    The Rethink K-12 School Models Grant is aimed at opening new, innovative ways for students to access K-12 education with an emphasis on meeting students’ needs during the coronavirus national emergency. The competition is open to state educational agencies which can apply for funds in one of the three categories:

    1. Microgrants for families, so that states can ensure they have access to the technology and educational services they need to advance their learning
    2. Statewide virtual learning and course access programs, so that students will always be able to access a full range of subjects, even those not taught in the traditional or assigned setting
    3. New, field-initiated models for providing remote education not yet imagined, to ensure that every child is learning and preparing for successful careers and lives

    The full Notice Inviting Applications (NIA) will be available online today.

    The Reimagining Workforce Preparation Grants are designed to expand short-term postsecondary programs and work-based learning programs in order to get Americans back to work and help small businesses return to being our country’s engines for economic growth. The full NIA for this competition will be issued later this week.

    Secretary DeVos continued, “Current students and displaced workers will be navigating a very different job market and economy once America reopens. This competition is a tremendous opportunity for states to think creatively and strategically about what their workforce needs will be and how to support entrepreneurs and small business in order to get the economic engines in their states firing on all cylinders again.”

    Application packages for these competitions will be available within two weeks. Applicants will then have 60 days to apply. As with most of the Department of Education’s discretionary grant competitions, applications will be evaluated by a panel of independent peer reviewers, and the highest-scoring applications will be funded. For additional information about how to apply, please visit https://oese.ed.gov/offices/education-stabilization-fund/states-highest-coronavirus-burden/.

    The Department continues to update www.ed.gov/coronavirus with information on COVID-19 for students, parents, educators and local leaders.

    For more information about COVID-19, please visit the following websites: coronavirus.govcdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html, and usa.gov/coronavirus.

  •  

    04/20: Enhanced Testing

    State of Colorado Helping with COVID-19 Enhanced Testing at Long Term Care Facilities
     
    DENVER, April 20, 2020:  The Unified Command Center (UCC) initiated testing at long term care facilities on April 19.  COVID-19 testing is supported by members of the Colorado National Guard, Colorado State Patrol and Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment at three long term care facilities (LTCF) along the front range this week.  With approximately 40 percent of Colorado’s COVID-19 fatalities associated with LTCF the state strategy is testing at locations based on the size of the facility (number of staff and residents) and no previously reported outbreaks.  The goal is earlier identification of COVID-19 cases so we can try to limit spread in the facilities.
     
    The three facilities tested this week are located in El Paso, Adams and Broomfield Counties.  Three hundred tests will be provided for each facility to test staff and residents. 
     
    Pikes Peak Center

    • Location: El Paso County
    • Testing Date: Sunday, April 19, 2020
    Elms Haven Center
    • Location: Adams County
    • Testing Date: Tuesday, April 21, 2020
    Broomfield Skilled Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
    • Location: Broomfield County
    • Testing Date: April 23, 2020
  •  

    04/17: Masks Recommended

    Public Highly Recommended to Wear Face Masks 

    To help slow the spread of COVID-19, Governor Jared Polis requested Coloradoans wear cloth face masks whenever they are out for essential business. 

    While it is not mandatory or enforceable in Colorado, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and local public health officials strongly urge individuals to wear masks as science is showing some people may spread the virus when they do not have symptoms. The virus can be spread when people are speaking, coughing or sneezing.  A face covering can help reduce the spread of large droplets and lower the risk of transmission of the virus by someone who may be sick and not realize it. 

    Earlier this month, Polis requested voluntary compliance of wearing of face masks when people are out conducting essential business such as shopping for groceries or going to the pharmacy. He also recommended masks be worn when going for a walk or engaging in other recreational activities such as running, bike riding and hiking. 

    The CDC recommends some individuals not wear cloth masks if they are children under the age of 2, anyone who has trouble breathing or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance. 

    “The reason people are being asked to wear masks is to protect them and protect others, especially our most vulnerable community members,” said Randy Evetts, public health director of the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment. “Remember wearing a mask should not replace social distancing, washing your hands often and keeping your hands away from your eyes, nose and mouth.” 

    Individuals are asked to wear cloth masks and save the medical masks for healthcare providers and first responders. Cloth masks can be made from such items as bandanas, scarves, t-shirts, towels and sewn fabric.  

    Masks should fit snugly and comfortably against the side of the face; be secured with ties or ear loops; include multiple layers of fabric; allow for breathing without restriction and be able to be laundered and machine dried without damage or change to shape. 

    When removing a mask assume that it is contaminated. Be careful not to touch eyes, nose or mouth when taking it off your face. Wash your hands immediately after removing. Do not put a used mask in a pocket or purse but put it in the washing machine or a bucket of soapy water until it can be cleaned and rinsed. Masks should be washed after each use. 

    Tips on how to make a mask are available at coloradomaskproject.com

    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the most vulnerable in Pueblo by: 

    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people 
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them. 
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary. Consult your primary care provider.  
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you’re sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:  

  •  

    04/17: Pueblo Cases

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced a sixth death of a Pueblo County resident related to COVID-19. An 86-year-old male who had previously been reported as a positive case in Pueblo County, has passed away from the virus. Public health officials also announced today six new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County. The new cases are 27-year-old female, 29-year-old female, 40-year-old female, 43-year-old female, 46-year-old female and 95-year-old female.

    Pueblo County now has a total of 84 confirmed positive cases among Pueblo County residents. Nine additional positive cases are from individuals residing in other counties (one from Alamosa, one from Crowley County, one from Huerfano County, one from Douglas County, two from Fremont County, one from Rio Grande, one from Prowers and one from Custer County). There have been 640 tests administered in Pueblo County. There have been 528* negative results with 16 tests results still pending, and three tests unable to be read and determined unsatisfactory. To date, four Pueblo County residents have passed away.

    *(Negative test results reflect only those reported by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and do not include those negatives results from tests administered through private labs).

    Pueblo County’s 84 COVID-19 Confirmed Cases

    Cases in Pueblo by Age Group

    Age                  Cases

    Group

    0-9                   1

    10-19               1

    20-29               11                                

    30-39               10

    40-49               13

    50-59               14

    60-69               11                    

    70-79               12

    80+                  11                    

     

    Cases in Pueblo by Sex

    Female            51

    Male               33

     

    Pueblo County’s 5 COVID-19 Deaths

    Death in Pueblo by Age Group

    Age                  Cases

    Group

    0-9                   0

    10-19               0                      

    20-29               0                                                          

    30-39               0

    40-49               0

    50-59               1 

    60-69               1                      

    70-79               0                      

    80+                  4         

    A Message from Pueblo Mayor Gradisar

    Mayor Gradisar’s Friday video message for today, April 17, 2020. https://youtu.be/YYFqmrJudEY

    Pueblo Library District Extends Closure to May 3

    The Pueblo Library District is extending the closure of all library branches through May 3. Patrons will still have access to the library district’s digital hub which can be accessed at www.pueblolibrary.org.

    State Health Department Launches Pilot COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Survey

    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment launched a short survey designed to track symptoms of COVID-19, even among those who are unable or do not need to get a test. The data collected in the survey cannot replace official case data confirmed in testing, but it may help public health officials track early warning signs that an outbreak could be imminent in a given area or region. The symptom tracker is on the  “do you have symptoms?” webpage  on the COVID-19 website.

    State Releases Pueblo Data on Ethnicity of COVID-19 Cases

    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment released ethnicity data on COVID-19 cases for counties with more than 100,000 population, including Pueblo County. In Pueblo County, 47% of the COVID-19 positive cases (34 people) are white, followed by 33% for Hispanics (24); 9% unknown ethnicity (7); 8% for black or African American (6) and 1% other (1).  For more information on the data go to covid19.colorado.gov.

    Many Essential Workers Still Required to be in the Field

    The public is reminded that many essential workers, including those working with utilities, continue to do work in the field to maintain the safe supply of electricity, gas, water and communications. The public is reminded to allow these individuals to complete their work without interference and to maintain social distance. These workers do have clearance to work under the state’s emergency orders.

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19

    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the Pueblo community and our most vulnerable in Pueblo by: 

    • Follow Governor's Stay At Home order to stay at home through April 26, 2020.
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.   
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you’re sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is answering questions 8AM – 5PM, Monday – Friday 719-583-4444.

  •  

    04/17: Pueblo County Receives Ventilators

    Pueblo County Receives Ventilators from the Strategic National Stockpile  

    Pueblo, CO. – Pueblo County received 10 ventilators Thursday as part of a shipment of 100 ventilators Colorado received from the Strategic National Stockpile.  

    Parkview Medical Center was one of 11 sites throughout the state to receive the ventilators for use in treatment of COVID-19 patients. Although the ventilators currently are located at Parkview, they could be moved based on the needs of hospitalized COVID-19 patients.   

    The Strategic National Stockpile is the nation’s largest supply of potentially life-saving pharmaceuticals and medical supplies for use in a public health emergency severe enough to cause local supplies to run out.   

    “Currently, we have a sufficient number of ventilators available in the community, but it’s beneficial to have additional ventilators should we get a surge in critical patients,” said Randy Evetts, public health director for the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment. 

    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the most vulnerable in Pueblo by: 

    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people 
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them. 
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.  
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you’re sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:  

  •  

    04/15: Positive Pueblo Cases

    4:00 p.m. Update Pueblo, CO #PuebloCOVID19 

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced today seven new positive COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County. The new cases are 30-year-old female, 74-year-old female, 67-year-old male, 94-year-old female, 52-year-old male, 77-year-old male and a 78-year-old female.

    Pueblo County now has a total of 73 confirmed positive cases among Pueblo County residents. Nine additional positive cases are from individuals residing in other counties (one from Alamosa, one from Crowley County, one from Huerfano County, one from Douglas County, two from Fremont County, one from Rio Grande, one from Prowers and one from Custer County). There have been 583 tests administered in Pueblo County. There have been 491* negative results with 7 tests results still pending, and three tests unable to be read and determined unsatisfactory. To date, four Pueblo County residents have passed away.

    *(Negative test results reflect only those reported by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and do not include those negatives results from tests administered through private labs).

    Pueblo County’s 73 COVID-19 Confirmed Cases

    Cases in Pueblo by Age Group

    Age                  Cases

    Group

    0-9                   0

    10-19               1

    20-29               9                                  

    30-39               8

    40-49               10

    50-59               13

    60-69               11                    

    70-79               11

    80+                  10                    

     

    Cases in Pueblo by Sex

    Female            42

    Male               31

    St. Mary Corwin Medical Center Designated Alternative Care Facility Location

    The state announced Tuesday afternoon three additional sites, including St. Mary Corwin Medical Center, that have been designated as alternative care facilities. The other two sites are in Grand Junction and Westminster.

    The alternative sites are designated as medical shelters and will be used to increase ICU bed availability. Alternative care sites serve as medical shelters only and are not field hospitals. The alternative care sites will only accept patients who are being transferred from hospitals or health care facilities. The sites WILL NOT be open for members of the public seeking medical care or diagnosis. For more on this go to covid19.colorado.gov/

    Governor Polis Signs Two Executive Orders to Limit Spread of COVID-19

    Governor Jared Polis on Tuesday signed two executive orders to assist with limiting the spread of COVID-19. One order supports emergency child care for essential workers and temporarily suspends certain statutes, enabling schools and school districts to focus on delivering instruction and student services. For more on the order read here

    The second order signed by Polis extends by 30 days the limits for in-person contact for the 2020 elections and the secretary of state’s operations. Read the executive order here

    District 70 Suspends Emergency School Lunch Program until April 27 

    Pueblo District 70 has suspended its emergency school lunch program until April 27 due to possible COVID-19 exposure to a food service worker. The district announced today that worker tested negative for the virus. District 70 is reminding the community there are other options for food resources in Pueblo County during the upcoming two weeks. The link is bit.ly/pueblofoodresourcedoc. For the latest updates, visit the District 70 website at www.district70.org.

    Childcare Assistance for Essential Workers

    The Pueblo YMCA, in partnership with Colorado Emergency Child Care Collaborative, is offering free full-day child care for children of parents who are first responders, medical personnel or other essential employees. Registration must be completed through the Colorado Child Care Collaborative at covidchildcarecolorado.com/ .  To find all child care opportunities in Colorado at covidchildcarecolorado.com/parent-survey-home/

    Applications Accepted for United Way’s Emergency Response & Recovery Funds 

    The United Way is accepting applications from non-profit organizations addressing immediate and long-term needs in response to Covid-19 for its Emergency Response & Recovery funds. Agencies eligible to apply for the funds must provide direct response, recovery or rebuilding to those affected by Covid-19 and be classified by the Internal Revenue Service as a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) public charity.  The maximum request is $10,000 and all organizations must complete a short grant application to be eligible for the funds. Immediate response applications are due April 25. Mid- to long-term grant applications are due May 16. To apply for the grant, go to pueblounitedway.org. The majority of the funds are designated for non-profit organizations serving Pueblo County, however limited funds are also available for non-profit organizations in Alamosa, Baca, Bent, Chaffee, Conejos, Costilla, Crowley, Custer, Fremont, Huerfano, Kiowa, Las Animas, Mineral, Otero, Prowers, Rio Grande and Saguache counties.

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19

    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the Pueblo community and our most vulnerable in Pueblo by: 

    • Follow Governor's Stay At Home order to stay at home through April 26, 2020.
    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.   
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you’re sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is answering questions 8AM – 5PM, Monday – Friday 719-583-4444.

  •  

    04/13: Positive Pueblo Cases

    April 13, 2020             

    4:00 p.m. Update Pueblo, CO #PuebloCOVID19 

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced today a fourth death of a Pueblo County resident related to COVID-19. A 97-year-old female who had previously been reported as a positive case in Pueblo County, has passed away from the virus. One additional COVID-19 cases in Pueblo County, a 65-year-old male was also announced.

    Pueblo County now has a total of 64 confirmed positive cases among Pueblo County residents. Seven additional positive cases are from individuals residing in other counties (one from Alamosa, one from Crowley County, one from Huerfano County, one from Douglas County, one from Fremont County, one from Rio Grande, one from Custer County). There have been 527 tests administered in Pueblo County. There have been 449* negative results with 2 tests results still pending, and three tests unable to be read and determined unsatisfactory. To date, four Pueblo County residents have passed away.

    *(Negative test results reflect only those reported by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and do not include those negatives results from tests administered through private labs).

    Pueblo County’s 64 COVID-19 Confirmed Cases

    Cases in Pueblo by Age Group

    Age              Cases

    Group

    • 0-9              0
    • 10-19           1
    • 20-29           7                       
    • 30-39           7
    • 40-49           10
    • 50-59           12
    • 60-69           10              
    • 70-79           8
    • 80+              9               

    Cases in Pueblo by Sex

    • Female  37
    • Male      27

    District 70 Holds Virtual School Board Meeting Tuesday

    The District 70 school board will hold its regular meeting virtually at 5 p.m. Tuesday. The public is allowed to submit requests to address the board and those requests must be emailed to Pam Smith at pasmith@district70.org. The board meeting will be live streamed on the District 70 YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/channel/UC0X3-WmRaMW3iAhrFvHjcDg. A copy of the board agenda is available at https://go.boarddocs.com/co/psd70/Board.nsf/Public

    Applications Accepted for United Way’s Emergency Response & Recovery Funds 

    The United Way is accepting applications from non-profit organizations addressing immediate and long-term needs in response to Covid-19 for its Emergency Response & Recovery funds. Agencies eligible to apply for the funds must provide direct response, recovery or rebuilding to those affected by Covid-19 and be classified by the Internal Revenue Service as a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) public charity.  The maximum request is $10,000 and all organizations must complete a short grant application to be eligible for the funds. Immediate response applications are due April 25. Mid- to long-term grant applications are due May 16. To apply for the grant, go to pueblounitedway.org. The majority of the funds are designated for non-profit organizations serving Pueblo County, however limited funds are also available for non-profit organizations in Alamosa, Baca, Bent, Chaffee, Conejos, Costilla, Crowley, Custer, Fremont, Huerfano, Kiowa, Las Animas, Mineral, Otero, Prowers, Rio Grande and Saguache counties.

    FEMA Providing $3 million in Essential Baby Supplies to Colorado Families

    Colorado has received $3 million in infant supplies from FEMA to help families who are experiencing poverty due to the Covid-19 pandemic. The supplies, which include formula, diapers and diaper wipes, will be distributed through food banks and family resource centers at 41 locations throughout the state, including Catholic Charities Diocese of Pueblo.  The supplies are also available to families enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and child care providers participating in the Emergency Child Care Collaborative.  For more information on how to access the resources go to the Office of Early Childhood’s website

    Governor Polis Urges Hotels/Motel Owners to Provide Rooms for Homeless

    Governor Jared Polis announced today he has sent a letter to owners of hotels and motels in Colorado asking them to provide rooms for the state’s homeless to protect against the spread of Covid-19. The need for non-congregate rooms is urgent due to the potential for currently sheltered people to be forced into large scale, dangerous facilities or back onto the streets. The governor encourages hotel and motel owners to work with local leaders to find innovative solutions to the issue. To read the letter click here

    Governor Polis Encourages Children to Use Creativity in Designing Artwork for Protective Masks

    Governor Jared Polis today announced the establishment of the Colorado Mask Contest for school children. The contest is aimed at getting children to create artwork for protective masks the public is being asked to wear due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Children are encouraged to create a design and submit it to the coloradomaskcontest.org.  Some artwork will be featured on social media and some designs will be selected to be printed on commercially created facemasks. 

    Xcel Energy Donates 90,000 Protective Masks to Healthcare Workers in Colorado

    Xcel Energy announced it is donating an additional 50,000 protective masks, including 1,250 N95 masks, to healthcare workers in Colorado. Last week, Xcel donated 40,000 masks to healthcare professionals in Colorado. The latest donation of masks is expected to arrive in Colorado later this week.

  •  

    04/06: Pueblo COVID-19 Cases

    April 6, 2020            

    4:00 p.m. Update Pueblo, CO #PuebloCOVID19 

    Public health officials from the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment announced today one additional positive COVID-19 cases for Pueblo County. The additional case is a 67-year-old male.

    Pueblo County now has a total of 45 confirmed positive cases among Pueblo County residents. Seven additional positive cases are from individuals residing in other counties (one from Alamosa, one from Crowley County, one from Huerfano County, one from Douglas County, one from Fremont County, one from Rio Grande, one from Custer County). There have been 426 tests administered in Pueblo County. There have been 354* negative results with 17 tests results still pending, and three tests unable to be read and determined unsatisfactory. To date, two Pueblo County residents have passed away.

    *(Negative test results reflect only those reported by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and do not include those negatives results from tests administered through private labs).

    Pueblo County’s 45 COVID-19 Confirmed Cases

    Gender Age

    • Male     20
    • Male     24
    • Male     26
    • Male     32
    • Male     36
    • Male     41  
    • Male     48
    • Male     52
    • Male     57
    • Male     57
    • Male     59
    • Male     63
    • Male     63
    • Male     67
    • Male     70
    • Male     76
    • Male     79
    • Male     80 (passed away)
    • Female 19
    • Female 20
    • Female 26
    • Female 34
    • Female 34
    • Female 36 
    • Female 37
    • Female 41
    • Female 44
    • Female 47
    • Female 48
    • Female 52
    • Female 53
    • Female 55
    • Female 58
    • Female 63
    • Female 65
    • Female 67
    • Female 68
    • Female 71
    • Female 73
    • Female 75
    • Female 76
    • Female 77
    • Female 80
    • Female 81 (passed away)
    • Female 82

    Governor Polis to hold statewide televised address tonight

    Governor Jared Polis is hosting a statewide address to discuss the response to the COVID-19 pandemic at 6:30 p.m. on local television station.

    Community Supply Collection for Healthcare Workers

    The Pueblo County Emergency Operations Center in collaboration with the Department of Public Health and Environment are collecting personal protective equipment for local healthcare providers. Donations can be made Tuesdays and Thursdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment, 101 W. 9th Street. All donations must be in original packaging with no broken seals. No homemade masks will be accepted.

    Guidelines to be tested for COVID-19

    To be tested for COVID-19, individuals, including EMS personnel, must show symptoms of COVID-19. People with the following symptoms may be referred by a medical doctor to be tested in Pueblo for COVID-19: fever (usually 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or higher), shortness of breath (difficulty breathing) and cough. Testing does not occur when a person does not show these symptoms.

    Public Health understands how individuals are concerned they may have been exposed or believe they have been exposed to COVID-19; however Public Health request those who are concerned stay home and self-quarantine and monitor for symptoms. If symptoms begin to show, people are instructed to call their primary care doctor. Those showing COVID-19 symptoms: fever (usually 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or higher), shortness of breath (difficulty breathing) and cough and do not have a primary care doctor may currently drive to Colorado Springs for testing, as that testing site does not require a physician’s referral to be tested.

    The Colorado Springs FEMA-sponsored COVID-19 testing site is currently providing testing for health care workers and first responders and expanded to provide testing for individuals over 65 years who have symptoms of COVID-19 (fever, cough, shortness of breath).

    Beginning Sunday, April 5, 2020, the site is open from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. The following people showing symptoms are accepted to get tested at this location:

    • Health care workers
    • First responders
    • Individuals who are over 65 years and are experiencing symptoms

    See below for more details on testing:

    • The site is located at 175 S. Union Blvd. in the back-parking lot.
    • Individuals only need to bring a picture ID and insurance information if they have it.
    • Qualified individuals will be tested, regardless of insurance status.
    • There is no cost for the testing, and no need to have a doctor’s prescription to receive testing.
    • This is a drive-through site and you will not be getting out of your car.
    • Please do not bring pets or others in your vehicle that will not be getting tested. 

    State website offers information on Governor’s mask project

    Governor Jared Polis requested last week that all Coloradoans wear a non-surgical cloth mask when they leave home to conduct essential functions to include grocery shopping or going to work. Tips on how to make masks and more about the mask project are available at coloradomaskproject.com

    District 70 Changes Grab-n-Go Lunches to Two Days a Week

    D70 is consolidating food services site this week to just Monday and Wednesday and students will receive two free lunches and breakfast in each meal bag.  Grab-n-Go lunches are available from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the following sites: Vineland Middle School, 1132 36th Lane; Liberty Point Middle School, 484 S. Maher Dr., Pueblo West; Skyview Middle School, 1947 Camino de Bravo, Pueblo West and Rye High School, 8083 Highway 165 in Rye.

    In the Beulah area, meals will be served at 11 a.m. Monday through Thursday at the Beulah School of Natural Science, 8734 School House Lane in Beulah.

    District 70 Schools to Remain Closed for the Year

    D70 schools will remain closed for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year. Pueblo District 70 Superintendent Ed Smith decided in the best interest of the students and staff, D70 schools will remain

    closed for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year.

    D70 looks forward to returning to school in August to welcome students, staff and families safely back into the buildings. District officials are making plans for end of year activities, including options for high school graduation, and will have further announcements as those plans are finalized.

    Remote Learning began in some D70 schools this week and will be implemented District wide on April 6, 2020. For the latest updated information visit www.district70.org.  

    Beware of Law Enforcement Impersonators Stopping Drivers Due to Stay-at-Home Order

    Local law enforcement officers are NOT conducting stops of individuals in response to the Governor’s Stay-at-Home order. Officers are still conducting stops for moving violations or traffic infractions and with that stop, they may inquire about the Stay-at-Home order. There have been reports in other counties of impersonators stopping people and doing checkpoints. Drivers should be aware and protect themselves from these impersonators. If you get stopped, make sure the vehicle has proper markings of police, sheriff or State Patrol. If you have doubts about who is stopping you, call 911 and ask the dispatcher to ask the law officer to provide proper identification. There is no mandate for individuals to carry an official letter stating they are an essential employee. 

    Local Mental Health Resources

    Health Solutions has added a online resource that addresses community resources, community support, eating well, food assistance and wellness strategies. The site is available at www.health.solutions/localsolutions.  Services are also available through Health Solutions at 719-545-2746.

    Help Protect Pueblo from COVID-19

    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the Pueblo community and our most vulnerable in Pueblo by: 

    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.   
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you’re sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched. 

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents and media to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19: 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is answering questions 8AM – 5PM, Monday – Friday 719-583-4444.

  •  

    03/25: Returning to Work

    March 25, 2020         

    4:00 p.m. What Public Health Wants You to Know: 
    “Returning to Work” Pueblo, CO #PuebloCOVID19 

    This is to guide individuals returning to work following recommended quarantine or isolation. 

    If your employer will not allow you to return to work after quarantine or isolation without a test: 

    • Contact your human resources representative. If your human resources representative has questions, they may call 719-583-4369. 

    If you are an employer with concerns allowing an employee to return to work without a test: 

    • Please call 719-583-4369 for further guidance. 

    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment does not have, and cannot provide, individuals with a letter clearing you to go back to work. If you had symptoms consistent with COVID-19, you should isolate yourself for 7 days after symptoms started, and continue isolating yourself until you are fever-free (without the use of fever reducing medications) for 3 days.

    Public health is not requiring people to have a negative test to return to work. If your employer is requiring this, you may want to contact your doctor, or another health care provider, or direct your employer to this website (under FAQ- Public health and employment). 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is answering questions 8 AM – 5 PM, Monday – Friday, 719-583-4444. 

    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the most vulnerable in Pueblo by: 

    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.  
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you’re sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.  

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:  

  •  

    03/25: Senior Shopping Time

    March 25, 2020       

    3:00 p.m. What Public Health Wants You to Know:
    “Seniors Shopping Time” Pueblo, CO #PuebloCOVID19

    Many stores in the area are offering a separate time for senior only shopping to assist in keeping one of the most vulnerable populations protected from the spread of COVID-19. At this time, information for senior only shopping is as follows:

    • Albertson’s
      • Tuesdays and Thursdays, 7 – 9 AM
    • Dollar General, 1245 Spruce
      • Every day, 8 – 9 AM
    • Dollar General, W. 18th Street
      • Sundays, 8 – 9 AM
    • Dollar General, 1502 Troy
      • Every day, 8 –9 AM
    • Dollar General, 609 Pueblo Boulevard
      • Thursdays, 12 – 1 PM; All other days, 8 –9 AM
    • Dollar General, 1610 Santa Fe
      • Every day, 8 – 9 AM
    • Dollar General, 2417 Prairie
      • Every day, 8 –9 AM
    • King Soopers North and South
      • Monday, Wednesday, and Friday: 7 – 9 AM
    • LaGrees
      • Every day, 8 – 10 AM
    • Natural Grocers
      • Sundays,  9 – 10 AM
    • Safeway Southside and Pueblo West
      • Tuesdays and Thursdays, 7 – 9 AM
    • Sam’s Club
      • Thursdays, 7 – 9 AM
    • Save-A-Lot
      • Every day, 7 – 8 AM
    • Target
      • Every day, 8 – 9 AM
    • Walmart; South, North, Pueblo West, Neighborhood Market
      • Every day  6 -7 AM

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is answering questions 8 AM – 5 PM, Monday – Friday, 719-583-4444.   

    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the most vulnerable in Pueblo by:

    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.
    • Stay home when you’re sick.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:

    ###

  •  

    03/19: Food Production and Supply

    Broomfield, Colo. - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are ensuring that food production and supply systems nationwide remain safe and abundant. Currently, there is no evidence to suggest that food produced in the United States can transmit COVID-19, and no evidence to support the transmission of COVID-19 associated with imported goods. Additionally, there are no reported cases of COVID-19 in the United States associated with imported goods.

    “People across Colorado can rest assured that our state’s food supply systems are operating as intended:  To provide plenty of safe food for the public,” said Colorado Commissioner of Agriculture Kate Greenberg. “The Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA) is working closely with the USDA, together ensuring the safety and timely delivery of the U.S. food supply while protecting the health of our employees during the COVID-19 National Emergency.”

    Commissioner Greenberg has created a Food Security Task Force to work closely with Colorado’s agriculture producers and food companies across the supply chain to support their needs during the COVID-19 emergency. For more information about the Task Force, please contact Tom Lipetzky, Director of CDA’s Markets Division, or Jordan Beezley, CDA Legislative and Policy Advisor.

    The public is reminded to consult only trusted scientific sources for accurate information about food safety, supply and COVID-19. Please see the attached food safety fact sheet from the Colorado Department of Agriculture and visit the U.S. Food and Drug Administration  and U.S. Department of Agriculture food safety FAQ pages.

  •  

    03/17: PSAT and SAT

    CDE announces pause on 2019-20 state assessments, accountability

    State working on possible solution for PSAT, SAT

    DENVER – The administration of end-of-the-year assessments, including the Colorado Measures of Academic Success (CMAS), will be paused for the remainder of the 2019-20 school year due to extensive school closures throughout Colorado to prevent the spread of COVID-19, Colorado Education Commissioner Katy Anthes announced today. 

    “With the extraordinary actions we are taking to prevent the spread of COVID-19, it’s clear that we need to press pause on our CMAS tests this year,” Commissioner Anthes said. “Students and educators need to feel a sense of stability and normalcy before state tests can be administered and produce valid results. This also means we plan to pause our school and district state accountability system as it relates to state assessments for a year.” 

    CDE is working with The College Board to generate possible solutions for the administration of the PSAT and SAT tests, which offer unique roles in Colorado’s system in terms of scholarships and college entrance. Additional information will come from CDE as it becomes available.

    CDE intends to engage with the U.S. Department of Education to address implications, including those related to federal accountability, and will complete waiver documentation as necessary, Anthes said.

    "I’m a big fan of accountability and transparency in public education, but we will simply have to forgo incredibly useful data on student achievement for a year to help contain the virus,” said Colorado Gov. Jared Polis. “Right now, students, families, and educators need to be focused on doing everything they can to keep families safe and stable. It is clear that COVID-19 will put extraordinary stress on our education system for the coming weeks and months. In order to ensure our schools and educators are able to spend as much time as possible on online instruction in a difficult situation, I support the decision to pause assessments and school accountability for this year only.”

    Making the decision to pause testing now allows schools and districts to concentrate on determining ways to deliver continued instruction to the extent they are able during this unprecedented disruption in education, Anthes said.

    The department will continue working with schools and districts that are already identified for improvement to help support instruction, including options for instruction during and after school closures. 

    CDE has compiled resources about Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) for schools and districts on its website, http://www.cde.state.co.us/safeschools.
  •  

    03/16: St. Patrick's Day

    St. Patrick’s Day Message from Mayor Nicholas Gradisar

    Pueblo has a long tradition of celebrating St. Patrick’s Day. This year must be different. Due to the COVID-19 Virus Health Emergency, I encourage everyone to celebrate the holiday at home with your family. Because we are in the midst of this infectious outbreak which is spread for the most part by personal contact, it is imperative that we maintain adequate social distancing. Experts suggest that we maintain six feet of distance between ourselves and others. Unfortunately, this social distancing cannot be accomplished by eating inside restaurants and bars.

    Each of us has a role to play in fighting this battle. While restricting inside dining and drinking will be unfortunate for those small businesses, it is absolutely necessary to slow the spread of this infection. Encourage your favorite restaurant to limit their services to take out only or outside dining.

    As of this writing we only have one confirmed case of the virus in Pueblo. While this number will surely increase, to date, there is no evidence that it is being transmitted within the community. Maintaining our social distancing can mitigate the spread of the infection. These are unprecedented times and they require unprecedented measures, as difficult as they may be.

    Pueblo will make it through this crisis, and we will soon be back to planning community activities and celebrations. The precautions that we make today will ensure that we will be celebrating as a community again soon.

Pueblo Communicators Unify to Share Timely Information about Coronavirus

The Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment (PDPHE