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  • COVID-19 Update: Remote Operations in Effect

     

    Until further notice, CSU Pueblo is serving our students and the public in a remote model.

Community Announcements

Colorado Governor Jared Polis

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    04/03: Colorado Mask Campaign

    USE FACEMASKS BUT DON’T ABANDON SOCIAL DISTANCING, HYGIENE RECOMMENDATIONS

    DENVER - Governor Jared Polis today announced the Colorado Mask Campaign which encourages individuals to wear non-medical cloth face masks when they go out for essential business due to COVID-19 pandemic. Public health officials also urge people to not expect the masks to protect against the virus and become lax on critical social distancing and proper hygiene measures. 

    The recommendation by the Governor to wear a mask is voluntary but is being requested to protect the most vulnerable community members, to sustain the health care system for the next few months and to slow the spread of COVID-19.

    “We are recommending people wear cloth masks, not the medical masks, as it is critical we save those for our health care professionals,” said Dr. Chris Urbina, medical director for the Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment. “Remember, wearing a face mask is not a substitute for social distancing, washing your hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based solution and coughing into your elbow or a tissue.”

    Urbina reminds people that when wearing a face mask, avoid adjusting the mask and touching your eyes, nose and mouth. “If you are sick stay at home,” he added.

    Public health officials are requesting the public refrain from buying and using critical medical masks and other personal protective equipment that healthcare workers need to do their job safely and effectively.

    The public is asked to use fabric masks beginning today and those coverings can include bandanas, scarves, sewn fabric masks or by repurposing a t-shirt or dish towel to fit your face. The masks should cover the nose and mouth. All cloth masks should be worn once and then washed with hot water and soap before wearing them again.

    The Centers for Disease Control has announced that 25% of people infected with COVID-19 are asymptomatic and spreading infected respiratory droplets. A face covering helps lower the risk of spreading by someone who may be sick and not realize it. Cloth face coverings can be worn to reduce the spread of large droplets. This can help prevent community spread when people travel from their homes for necessary activities like grocery shopping. Individuals should also wear masks while recreating.

    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the most vulnerable in Pueblo by:

    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people
    • Isolate yourself if you feel symptoms of shortness of breath, cough, temperature of 100.4 or higher call your medical provider before visiting them.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.
    • Stay home when you’re sick.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:

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    03/30: Colorado Case Updates

    DENVER - Gov. Jared Polis provided an update on Colorado’s response to COVID-19 as well as information on current cases in Colorado, including the number of cases, hospitalizations, and fatalities. Gov. Polis was also joined by Dr. Marc Moss, head of pulmonology at the University of Colorado - Anschutz Medical Campus and a doctor at UC Health who came to represent the thousands of medical professionals working on the front lines in Colorado. 

    While the virus is still spreading rapidly in Colorado, our community will start to see the effects of the recent steps we’ve taken in the coming days and weeks. In the near-term, it is crucial that we all stay home whenever possible to avoid jeopardizing the health of their friends, family, and community,” said Governor Jared Polis.

    “During this challenging time, though we must be distant physically from one another for our health, I encourage Coloradans to remain close to our loved ones through different forms of communication like telephone and video chat and through acts of kindness.”

    “As a pulmonary specialist, I have been on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic. We’re seeing this virus significantly impact Coloradans of all ages and we are now caring for an unprecedented number of critically ill patients,” said Dr. Marc Moss. “Our health care system is preparing for the worst and hoping for the best. We continue working alongside our fellow health care workers to ensure we are doing everything we can to care for our patients.”

    The Governor continued to urge Coloradans to stay home. Gov. Polis discussed the supplies that the state Colorado has requested from the federal government, what has been distributed thus far and what the remaining need it currently has and what is needed for Colorado to effectively slow the spread of the virus and protect the health and safety of Coloradans. 

    The Governor also discussed state traffic data as an important proxy to demonstrate the impact of recent social distancing and stay-at-home measures. Colorado has seen a 60% reduction of cars on the road over the last four weeks. This data was collected across the state on interstates, U.S. and state highways, and other roads from a network of more than 50 automatic traffic recorders (ATRs).

    These ATRs provide traffic count data that can be analyzed hourly, daily, and weekly and used to compare current traffic levels to baseline levels. Traffic levels can show changes in behavior, whether that’s a reduction in weekday work commuting, and changes in weekend driving that may be associated with errands or recreation. Between March 1-25, the average daily volume of vehicles is decreasing by 400 cars per day. View the presentation here

    On Saturday, March 28, the federal government approved a Major Disaster Declaration request for Colorado, unlocking access to more federal resources for the state. This designation, combined with the legislation passed by Congress and signed by the President, is welcome relief on both the emergency management front and the economic front. The Governor has held daily calls with Colorado’s federal delegation 

    On Sunday, March 22, Gov. Polis announced the creation of the Innovation Response Team (IRT). Today he announced the appointment of Sarah Tuneberg, an entrepreneur and emergency manager with more than a decade of public health and emergency management experience, as the Director of the IRT. The IRT is building a mass testing program for the COVID-19 virus, creating a suite of services for citizens under isolation or quarantine, developing mobile and other technologies to help track the spread of the virus and support infected citizens, and developing locally-sourced alternatives for constrained critical medical supplies.

    Watch today’s press conference here

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    03/30: New Executive Order

    DENVER - Gov. Polis signed an Executive Order temporarily suspending the personal appearance requirement before notarial officers to perform notarizations. 

    The Executive Order also authorizes the Secretary of State to promulgate and issue temporary emergency rules in order to facilitate remote notarization.  

    Read the Executive Order here

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    03/28: Major Disaster Status

    Gov. Polis Secures Major Disaster Status for Colorado

    DENVER - On Wednesday, March 25, Governor Polis submitted an urgent request to the federal government to help Colorado deal with the COVID-19 pandemic. Today, Governor Polis announced that President Trump and the federal government had approved the Governor’s request in declaring a Major Disaster for the State of Colorado. 

    “Colorado is now eligible to receive additional federal resources to help address the global epidemic impacting our state, the nation, and the world. This declaration ensures that Colorado can be on a level playing field with other states that already have this status like New York and Washington when it comes to federal disaster funding and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) assistance,” said Governor Polis. “Now more than ever, it’s important that Coloradans stay home whenever possible. I thank the members of Colorado’s federal delegation who advocated for this funding to recognize the seriousness of this public health crisis unfolding hour by hour in our state. We are forging new and innovating partnerships daily with the federal government and the private sector to minimize the health threat and the economic threat of the virus.” 

    Colorado is one of the states with the highest presence of COVID-19 on a per-capita basis, with a unique situation unfolding in our mountain communities. Colorado continues facing a shortage of resources in addressing this pandemic. 

    Read Governor’s Polis request which was supported by the majority of Colorado’s federal delegation here.  The Governor has engaged with Colorado’s congressional delegation daily on multiple calls and efforts to prioritize areas of federal relief. Members of Colorado’s federal delegation sent a letter to the President on Thursday urging him to approve Governor Polis’ request. Read their letter here. 

    California, Washington and New York have received these declarations

     

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    03/25: Stay at Home Order

    Gov. Polis Announces Statewide Stay-At-Home Order, Provides Update on Colorado Response to COVID-19 

    ***INFORMACIÓN SEGUIDA EN ESPAÑOL***

    CENTENNIAL - Today Gov. Polis announced a statewide stay-at-home order beginning on Thursday, March 26 at 6:00 a.m. and will last until April 11, 2020. The Governor also provided an update on the state’s response to COVID-19 and actions taken to limit the spread of the virus. 

    “Coloradans are living through a global pandemic and this decision was made to help save lives,” said Governor Jared Polis. “We will continue doing everything we can to get the resources Colorado needs to address COVID-19 and protect the health and safety of all Coloradans. In true Colorado spirit, we’re seeing our friends, family and neighbors rise to the challenge, donating their time, money or extra supplies to support relief efforts at the state and local levels. We are in this together and this is the season to stay at home to save lives.” 

    This executive order means Coloradans should not be leaving their homes except for critical activities including: 

    • Obtaining food and other household necessities including medicine
    • Going to and from work if you are a critical employee
    • Seeking medical care
    • Caring for dependents or pets
    • Caring for a vulnerable person in another location
    • Cannabis and liquor stores will remain open 
    • Or participating in outdoor recreation at a legally-mandated safe distance of six feet or more from other parties

    Read the full order here. Read the FAQ here. Read the public health order here. Watch the press conference here.  

    Colorado continues facing a shortage of resources in addressing this pandemic, which is why the Governor sent a letter to the Trump administration urging the president to declare a Major Disaster for the State of Colorado. A major disaster declaration would free up resources for medical care, housing, unemployment assistance, crisis counseling, hazard mitigation and more. California, Washington and New York have received these declarations. Read the request here. 

    While the state is facing a shortage of resources, Coloradans are stepping up to try and fill the gap. More than 7,000 Coloradans have already signed up to volunteer on www.helpcoloradonow.org, nearly 1,300 of which have medical training. The Colorado COVID Relief Fund has also raised more than $7 million since launching late last week. 

    Gov. Polis requested and received dual-status commander authority to ensure unity of command, allowing regular, federal military units to be controlled by a single commander representing the Governor. This will help to eliminate confusion and conflict and allow the state to streamline the utilization of military personnel in this response.

    The Governor announced that the state lab has eliminated its backlog and there will be new labs coming online at the University of Colorado, Colorado State University, University Hospital, and Children’s Hospital. The Governor thanked CSU and CU for their willingness to test the personal protective equipment the private sector is ramping up that the state needs now. 

    Governor Polis also provided an update on the federal stimulus package which included $377 billion for small business loans and grants, $1200 in direct cash assistance to Americans based on income eligibility.

    The Governor also provided an update on the Innovation Response Team, introducing two new members: Lucy Sanders and Tim Miller. Lucy is the CEO and a co-founder of the National Center for Women & Information Technology and will head up Isolation Services. The objective is to provide people who are in self-isolation or home quarantine with critical supplies like food and access to health care, and also ancillary services to make their at-home experience as comfortable as possible. Tim Miller is the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Rally Software and will head the Software Development Team. The objective is to build applications and web sites for both government and citizens to manage all aspects of the crisis, and provide the state with key data. 

    The Governor also noted that the Innovation Response Team is working as hard as they can to identify manufacturers and supply chains, but urged the private sector to help in this effort.

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    03/20: Grand Princess Passengers

    Colorado welcomes home 39 Colorado passengers from the Grand Princess cruise ship

    DENVER, March 20, 2020: The State of Colorado is welcoming home 39 cruise ship passengers who have been under U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) quarantine since their ship docked in California on March 9. 

    As requested by Governor Jared Polis in a letter to HHS Secretary Alex Azar, all passengers returning to Colorado are asymptomatic at the time of travel. If passengers were symptomatic in any way, they remain in federal care and will not be returning to Colorado at this time. 

    The 39 Coloradans will fly into Denver International Airport on March 20 at 3:30 p.m. on private charter airplanes and will not enter the concourses or main terminal. They will return to their homes via private vehicle or state-provided private van and will continue to self-quarantine until they have been in quarantine for a full 14 days, which includes their time in federal quarantine. 

    Forty-three Colorado residents were passengers on a Grand Princess cruise ship that docked at the Port of Oakland on March 9. Some passengers aboard the Grand Princess cruise ship experienced symptoms of COVID-19. Asymptomatic passengers have been in federal quarantine at the Dobbins Air Reserve Base, Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, and Travis Air Force base. 

    Two of the 43 Coloradans will be returning on a different flight from Dobbins Air Reserve Base in Atlanta, Georgia. This flight has not yet been scheduled. An additional two passengers are currently symptomatic at Travis Air Force base and will be returning to Colorado at a later time.

    Passenger demographics for the 43 Colorado passengers from the Grand Princess cruise ship:

    In order to protect passenger privacy, we are not releasing individual information about any passengers.

    The Coloradans will be returning to their homes in these cities: Aurora, Boulder, Castle Rock, Colorado Springs, Denver, Edwards, Ft. Collins, Greeley, Lakewood, Littleton, Longmont, Loveland, Westminster, Wheatridge, Windsor

    Ages:
    • 80s: 3
    • 70s: 15
    • 60s: 14
    • 50s: 4
    • 40s: 1
    • 30s: 2
    • 20s: 2
    • <18: 2

    To respect and protect passenger privacy, we ask that members of the media do not stage at the airport before the flight arrives. In order to be accommodating, the state suggests that media who are planning to shoot do so after the passengers have left the airport. There will be a media staging area at the Signature Flight Support building at the Denver International Airport. There will be no official statement or opportunity for interviews. 

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

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    03/19: Federal Loan Assistance

    Gov. Polis Secures Federal Loan Assistance for Colorado’s Small Businesses 

    Approval Unlocks Billions in Economic Recovery Loans for Small Businesses Impacted  by COVID-19

    DENVER – Colorado small businesses impacted by COVID-19 can seek individual small business loans up to $2M as part of the Small Business Administration’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan program. Small businesses throughout all 64 counties may seek SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loans. Governor Jared Polis announced that Colorado’s application for federal disaster area designation has been approved.  

    “The economic impact of COVID-19 has been felt across our state. We are committed to protecting public health and safety and will continue fighting to ensure the pain that Colorado’s small businesses are feeling is limited. This critical designation allows small businesses in all 64 Colorado counties to seek federal recovery loans that can help them through this challenging time. I thank the Colorado federal delegation for their efforts to help unlock this assistance,” said Governor Polis. 

    The SBA Disaster assistance provides low-interest federal loans for working capital to Colorado small businesses that have realized economic injury from COVID-19. Funding was appropriated through the US congressional Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act.  

    “Colorado’s Office of Economic Development and International Trade is committed to helping our small businesses access these vital funds,” said Executive Director Betsy Markey. “Eligibility information, loan application links and emerging economic recovery resources can all be found at choosecolorado.com.” 

    “Small businesses are the fabric of our economy and their success is dependent on the ability to freely market products and services to communities across the state and world,” said SBA Regional Administrator Dan Nordberg. “Local small businesses are bearing the brunt of that impact and facing a severe decline in customer traffic.  SBA’s top priority is to assist businesses adversely impacted by the Coronavirus (COVID-19) and our Economic Injury Disaster Loans can be the working capital lifelines they need to weather this difficult time.”

    Small businesses, private non-profit organizations, small agricultural cooperatives and small aquaculture enterprises impacted by COVID-19 can seek federal loans to pay key needs such as fixed debts, payroll, and accounts payable.

     

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    03/17: Public Places Closing

    To prevent COVID-19 Spread

    Closed starting at 8:00am - March 17, 2020 for 30 days

    • Restaurants and bars
    • Movie and performance theaters
    • Casinos
    • Gyms
    • Breweries
    • Coffeehouses

    Restaurants may offer a delivery service, window service, walk-up service, drive-through service, or drive-up service.

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    03/16: Economic Impacts

    Economic Forecast Shows COVID19

    Impacting Economy

    DENVER - Today, the Office of State Planning and Budgeting released the March economic forecast showing the significant economic impact of COVID-19. The overall economic impact is difficult to anticipate and depends on both the extent to which the epidemic can be slowed or contained and the effectiveness of federal fiscal and monetary policy interventions. 

    “COVID-19 has impacted the global economy and is having a significant impact on our state’s economy as well. I would call the economic situation in complete flux, and until we have a much better idea what’s going on I wouldn’t put much stock in any economic forecast, although we know the news isn’t good,” said Governor Polis.

    “My top priority during this time is protecting the health and safety of Coloradans which also minimizes damage to our economy. We’re doing everything we can to minimize the long-term economic impact of this global pandemic and ensure that Colorado is prepared to come back stronger than before when this crisis is over.” 

    While Colorado’s economy has expanded since the December forecast, the rapid spread of the COVID-19 virus poses a significant risk to the state’s economy. Economic activity is expected to slow sharply over the coming months as schools and businesses close and consumers stay home in an attempt to slow the spread of the pandemic. While this forecast projects that consumer and business activity will return to normal levels relatively quickly once schools and businesses reopen, there is an increasing risk that extended closures could trigger a recession as consumers stay home and workers and businesses lose income.

    As in Colorado, the economic outlook for the U.S. has deteriorated since December due to the recent expansion of COVID-19 into the country and the economic losses associated with widespread emergency closures of schools and businesses. Despite strong economic momentum in recent months, a sharp decline in economic activity is expected but there is still uncertainty. 

    General Fund revenue is expected to grow 1.2 percent in FY 2019-20 after growing by 7.2 percent in FY 2018-19. The General Fund revenue projection was revised down from the December forecast by $301.2 million in FY 2019-20 and $400.5 million in FY 2020-21 due to the expected impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. The primary General Fund revenue streams affected include individual and corporate income taxes and sales taxes.

    With these updated revenue projections, the General Fund reserve now is projected to be $225.8 million below the Governor’s requested statutory reserve amount of 7.5 percent of appropriations in FY 2020-21 under the Governor’s budget request, as amended January 15, 2020.

    Cash fund revenue is projected to remain flat in FY 2019-20 after growing by 5.8 percent in FY 2018-19. The forecast for FY 2020-21 is lower than the December forecast by $52.8 million, due largely to lower expected severance tax collections caused by lower oil prices after Saudi Arabia’s March 9th announcement that it would increase production volumes. Cash fund revenue is projected to grow by 1.5 percent in FY 2020-21 and 1.6 percent in 2021-22.

    Revenue subject to TABOR is not expected to exceed the Referendum C cap in either FY 2019-20 or FY 2020-21 after exceeding the cap by $428.3 million in FY 2018-19. TABOR revenue is not expected to exceed the Referendum C cap again until FY 2021-22, when the projected surplus is $216.6 million.

    To see the forecast presentation, click here

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    03/15: Ski Areas Closing

    Gov. Polis Issues Executive Order Suspending Down Hill Ski Area Operations for One Week 

     DENVER - Governor Jared Polis issued an executive order this evening in response to COVID-19 (coronavirus). 

    “Never would I have believed that a global pandemic would force the temporary closure of our world-class ski resorts. I have been skiing since I was four years old. Our family has had a place in Vail for three decades. And, like so many Colorado families, we were planning a ski trip with our kids over their spring break next weekend. Beyond being a major part of our way of life, skiing supports our workers and businesses,” said Governor Polis.

    “For those of us who treasure living our lives outdoors, sacrificing our fun is the easier part; but for those who depend on employment in our Colorado high country, the uncertainty of how long they will be out of a job is terrifying. It is with a profound sense of pain and grim responsibility that I take the agonizing action that this moment demands. I take solace in knowing that while we will be temporarily closed for business, we will be saving the lives of hundreds, perhaps thousands of Coloradans in the days and weeks ahead.”

    COVID-19 is a highly contagious viral disease that has spread throughout many of Colorado’s communities including our mountain communities where premier ski resorts are located.  Public health officials have concluded that disease control measures aimed at specific individuals or groups are no longer sufficient to contain the further spread of the virus.  

    “The challenges posed by COVID-19 are unique and place significant burdens on hospitals and medical personnel.  We are aware of the great cost that mountain communities face if our downhill ski resorts close, even temporarily.  These costs will be borne by local residents and businesses, and by the individuals and families who come to Colorado to enjoy our beautiful mountains and world-renowned skiing.  But in the face of this pandemic emergency we cannot hesitate to protect public health and safety,” the executive order reads. 

    The executive order directs downhill ski resorts to suspend operations for one week to slow the spread of COVID-19  and conserve medical resources in the state’s mountain communities. 

    The Governor will continue to monitor the course of the COVID-19 outbreak in the state and may amend this Executive Order accordingly.

    Read the full executive order here.

Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment

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    04/03: Distributing Critical Resources

    State health department distributes third allotment from Strategic National Stockpile

    DENVER, April 3, 2020: The Colorado State Emergency Operations Center (EOC) and Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) are distributing critical resources to help communities respond to COVID-19. This week, Colorado received a third allotment from the Strategic National Stockpile, which is being distributed across the state.  

    The Strategic National Stockpile is “the nation’s largest supply of potentially life-saving pharmaceuticals and medical supplies for use in a public health emergency severe enough to cause local supplies to run out.” This week Colorado received its third allotment, which included:

    • 122,490 N95 masks
    • 287,022 surgical masks
    • 56,160 face shields
    • 57,300 surgical gowns
    • 392,000 gloves
    • 3,636 coveralls

    Colorado has received a total of the following materials from all three allotments:

    • 220,010 N95 masks
    • 517,000 surgical masks
    • 100,232 face shields
    • 100,140 surgical gowns
    • 504,000 gloves
    • 3,816 coveralls

    Information about the first allotment can be found here and the second allotment can be found here.

    The State Unified Command Group, which is part of the State EOC, will distribute these materials to every county health department and tribe throughout the state where they are needed most. The following factors were used to determine allocation:

    • county population
    • portion of the population that is older than age 65 proportional to the state population
    • the number of nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and hospitals
    • if the county or tribe has received supplies previously

    All counties health departments and tribes in the state will receive supplies. CDPHE will work with regional staff to coordinate deliveries.

    There are many ways people can contribute to these efforts:

    • The EOC is coordinating requests for supplies, donations of supplies, vendors who can provide supplies, and trained medical personnel. Please follow the three steps on the Colorado Business EOC website [colorado.gov/cobeoc/business-members-and-vendors] to create an account in the state resource database. The State EOC uses this database to fill all resource requests from state and local agencies during emergencies.
    • Coloradans who wish to donate or volunteer to help those affected by COVID-19 should visit www.helpcoloradonow.com.
    • There is an urgent need for blood. Go to vitalent.org to sign up to donate blood.

    Personal protective equipment (PPE) is meant for single-use and is recommended by the CDC to be used for COVID-19 testing. In order to preserve these important resources for critical health care needs, CDPHE is urging the public to not wait for a test to self-isolate. People who are not at high risk of severe illness may not need to be evaluated in person or tested for COVID-19. Not everyone with symptoms will be tested right away. Call your health care provider only if your illness becomes more severe, especially if you are experiencing shortness of breath. 

    If you have any symptoms -- even mild ones -- public health urges you to stay home and isolate yourself until: 

    • You have had no fever for at least 72 hours (without the use of medicine) AND
    • Other symptoms (cough, shortness of breath) have improved AND
    • At least 7 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared.
    • Anyone in your household you have had close contact with (within six feet for approximately 10 minutes) should self-quarantine for 14 days, even if you haven’t been tested for COVID-19.
    • If you have a medical emergency, call 911. If you have severe respiratory symptoms, especially shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, tell the 911 dispatcher about your symptoms. Do not wait for a COVID-19 test to call 911.

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

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    03/30: Testing Strategy

    State health department provides update on statewide COVID-19 testing strategy 

    DENVER, March 30, 2020: Testing for COVID-19 continues to be a top priority for the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE). The Colorado Unified Coordination Group (UCG)  is currently supporting strategic, targeted community testing for health care workers and first responders, and are working to increase the state’s testing capabilities.

    There are two primary routes to testing in Colorado today:

    1. Hospital staff, hospitalized patients, and vulnerable, symptomatic patients receiving care at health care facilities can get tested at those facilities.
    2. Critical health care workers and first responders who have symptoms can get tested at community testing sites being run by local public health agencies in various communities.

    “Right now, due to limited supplies of testing kits and personal protective equipment, testing needs to be focused on the people who are the most at-risk from this disease and the people in charge of caring for and keeping the rest of us safe. It’s important to protect the most critical element of the health care system. We are working hard to get the supplies and capacity to move to broader public testing, but until then our message remains the same: if you have only mild symptoms, self-isolate and don’t wait for a test,” said Scott Bookman, CDPHE COVID-19 Incident Commander. 

    The state has distributed 4200 testing kits and PPE to local public health agencies in El Paso, Larimer and Mesa Counties. The counties will use these supplies to test healthcare workers and first responders across their regions. The CDPHE lab also sent 300 testing kits to the Ute Mountain Ute tribe. More testing kits will be provided to local public health agencies once those supplies are received from FEMA.

    Meanwhile, the UCG  is working to develop plans that local public health agencies can use to conduct their own community testing sites when testing kits are more readily available. 

    Personal protective equipment (PPE) is meant for single-use and is recommended by the CDC to be used for COVID-19 testing. In order to preserve these important resources for critical health care needs, CDPHE has recommended that health care providers prioritize testing according to these tiers: 

    TIER 1 

    • Hospitalized patients
    • Health care workers with symptoms

    TIER 2

    • Patients in long-term care facilities or other residential settings such as homeless shelters or correctional facilities with symptoms
    • Patients over age 65 with symptoms
    • Patients with underlying conditions with symptoms*
    • First responders with symptoms
    • Critical infrastructure workers with symptoms**
    • People with symptoms who work with vulnerable populations or in group residential settings

    TIER 3

    • Other individuals with symptoms

    CDPHE is urging the public to not wait for a test to self-isolate. People who are not at high risk of severe illness may not need to be evaluated in person or tested for COVID-19. Not everyone with symptoms will be tested right away.

    Call your healthcare provider if your illness becomes more severe, especially if you are experiencing shortness of breath. You can use telehealth or a nurseline to get medical guidance; find out more and access a  list of telehealth and nurseline resources here:
    https://covid19.colorado.gov/telehealth-and-nurselines

    If you have any symptoms -- even mild ones -- public health urges you to stay home and isolate yourself until: 

    • You have had no fever for at least 72 hours (without the use of medicine) AND
    • Other symptoms (cough, shortness of breath) have improved AND
    • At least 7 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared.
    • Anyone in your household you have had close contact with (within six feet for approximately 10 minutes) should self-quarantine for 14 days, even if you haven’t been tested for COVID-19.
    • If you have a medical emergency, call 911. If you have severe respiratory symptoms, especially shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, tell the 911 dispatcher about your symptoms. Do not wait for a COVID-19.
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    03/30: Survey on Attitudes

    tate health department releases survey results showing attitudes about COVID-19 

    DENVER, March 27, 2020:  The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) released results from a survey asking Coloradans about their perceptions and attitudes related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Nearly 45,000 Coloradans completed the survey between March 22 and March 24, 2020. 

    Highlights of the survey include:

    • 72% of respondents are “very concerned” about COVID-19 in Colorado.
    • Among 18-29-year-old respondents, 59% are “very concerned” about COVID-19 in Colorado.
    • Nearly 90% of respondents think it’s somewhat or very likely that they would get sick from the novel coronavirus.
    • Half (50%) of the respondents have a combination of symptoms indicative of generalized anxiety over the last two weeks.
    • A large majority of the respondents are taking extra precautions around COVID-19 to keep the community healthy:
      • 97% are washing their hands with soap and water more frequently.
      • 96% are avoiding large gatherings.
      • 70% are working from home.
      • 35% are stockpiling food and other household items.
    • Three in four respondents would try to get tested if they were exposed or had symptoms. The most common reason respondents selected would be to help the public health system build a better picture of how the virus is spreading.
    • Of those who would not get tested:
      • Three in four respondents said they would isolate themselves from others regardless.
      • More than 50% of respondents would not get tested because they are not sure if they meet the criteria for testing.
      • 3% think the virus isn’t that serious.
    • 40% of part-time, full-time, or self-employed respondents do not have access to paid leave if they were not able to work because of illness.
    • 43% of respondents are now working from home in response to the COVID-19. (Note: This survey was conducted prior to the state-wide stay-at-home order.)
    • 11% of respondents have had their hours reduced, 9% have temporarily lost their jobs and 1% have permanently lost their jobs due to COVID-19.

    “This survey shows what we already knew, that Coloradans are strong, and we are all in this together,” said Jill Hunsaker Ryan, executive director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. “We’re relieved to see that so many people are doing their part to slow the spread of this deadly virus. If we keep this up, we will protect our health care system from being overloaded with critical cases and countless lives will be saved.”

    This survey was fielded among a sample of Coloradans who accessed the survey by going to the CDPHE website. This sample may have been more concerned about COVID-19 and may have been more likely to have made behavior changes. The link to the survey was shared widely after release, so that bias may have been reduced. Although people of all racial and ethnic groups took the survey, Hispanic and Black or African American participants are underrepresented.

    The complete dashboard is available here and also at covid19.colorado.gov/about-covid-19.

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

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    03/26: Dialing 2-1-1

    State of Colorado Activates 2-1-1 Colorado to Connect Coloradans with Human Services Resources During COVID-19 Pandemic 

    CENTENNIAL (March 26): Today, in partnership with Mile High United Way, the Colorado State Emergency Operations Center activated 2-1-1 Colorado to connect Coloradans with human service resources statewide. Coloradans can reach 2-1-1 Colorado online at 211Colorado.org, by dialing 2-1-1 or texting your Zip Code to 898-211. Do not call 911 for COVID-19 questions unless it is a medical emergency. 

    2-1-1 Colorado is a confidential and multilingual service connecting people across the State of Colorado to vital resources in their local community. 2-1-1 serves as one central location where people can access over 7,500 health and human service resources. 

    Callers may experience long wait times, as demand for information is high. 2-1-1 Colorado is hiring in order to reduce wait times and meet Coloradans’ needs. Coloradans can also reach 2-1-1 Colorado online at 211Colorado.org.

    2-1-1 provides navigation services to resources such as:  

    • Housing, including shelters and transitional services.
    • Rent and utility assistance.
    • Applying for SNAP benefits by phone.
    • Childcare.
    • Food/meals.
    • Transportation.
    • Clothing/personal/household needs.
    • Mental health and substance use disorders. 
    • Employment.
    • Education.
    • Medical clinics.
    • Dental clinic.
    • Other government/economic services. 

    2-1-1 will work in conjunction with The Colorado Health Emergency Line for the Public (CO HELP), a toll-free hotline for the latest public health information. If Coloradans are looking for general information about COVID-19, such as the number of cases in Colorado, the list of symptoms, or how you can protect yourself, they can call CO HELP by dialing 303-389-1687 or 1-877-462-2911.  

    "2-1-1 Colorado provides an invaluable service to thousands of individuals and families across Colorado. 2-1-1 is committed to meeting the growing needs of our community members impacted by the outbreak, and we are expanding our capacity to reach more people in need of support. We encourage all of our neighbors in need of immediate resources to connect with 2-1-1 Colorado to get help. We are grateful to the State of Colorado for their support and all the volunteers and donors who are supporting us to be able to answer the call,” said Christine Benero, President and CEO, Mile High United Way. 

    2-1-1 Resource Navigators are available to help by phone, Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. and have access to a language translation service to accommodate over 170 languages. Coloradans can also reach 2-1-1 toll-free by dialing 866-760-6489. 

    2-1-1 and CO HELP cannot offer medical advice or assistance. If you are having a medical emergency, call 911.

     

  •  

    03/25: Strategic National Stockpile

    State health department to distribute resources from Strategic National Stockpile

    DENVER, March 25, 2020: The Colorado State Emergency Operations Center (EOC) and Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) are distributing critical resources today to help communities respond to COVID-19. 

    This week, Colorado received a second allotment from the Strategic National Stockpile, which it will begin distributing across the state today.  

    The Strategic National Stockpile is “the nation’s largest supply of potentially life-saving pharmaceuticals and medical supplies for use in a public health emergency severe enough to cause local supplies to run out.” This week Colorado received its second allotment, which included:

    • 49,920 N95 masks
    • 117,500 surgical masks
    • 21,312 face shields
    • 20,820 surgical gowns
    • 108,000 gloves

    CDPHE estimates that these supplies are sufficient for approximately one full day of statewide operations under normal standards of care. Information about the first allotment can be found here

    The State Unified Command Group, which is part of the State EOC, will distribute these materials to every county health department and tribe throughout the state where they are needed most. The following factors were used to determine allocation:

    • County population.
    • Portion of the population that is older than age 65 proportional to the state population.
    • The number of nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and hospitals.
    • If the county or tribe has received supplies previously.

    All county health departments and tribes in the state will receive supplies. CDPHE will work with regional staff to coordinate deliveries.

    “Because of the finite amount of supplies, we, and numerous other states across the country, are not receiving the amounts we are requesting. However, the State of Colorado is not waiting to resolve this issue; we are working with the private sector and the public to find ways to increase our inventory of critical medical equipment and supplies,” said Mike Willis, Director of the State EOC.

    There are many ways people can contribute to these efforts:

    • The EOC is coordinating requests for supplies, donations of supplies, vendors who can provide supplies, and trained medical personnel. Please follow the three steps on the Colorado Business EOC website [colorado.gov/cobeoc/business-members-and-vendors] to create an account in the state resource database. The State EOC uses this database to fill all resource requests from state and local agencies during emergencies.
    • Coloradans who wish to donate or volunteer to help those affected by COVID-19 should visit www.helpcoloradonow.com.
    • There is an urgent need for blood. Go to vitalent.org to sign up to donate blood.

    Personal protective equipment (PPE) is meant for single-use and is recommended by the CDC to be used for COVID-19 testing. In order to preserve these important resources for critical health care needs, CDPHE is urging the public to not wait for a test to self-isolate. People who are not at high risk of severe illness may not need to be evaluated in person or tested for COVID-19. Not everyone with symptoms will be tested right away. Call your healthcare provider only if your illness becomes more severe, especially if you are experiencing shortness of breath. 

    If you have any symptoms-- even mild ones-- public health urges you to stay home and isolate yourself until: 

    • You have had no fever for at least 72 hours (without the use of medicine) AND
    • Other symptoms (cough, shortness of breath) have improved AND
    • At least 7 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared.
    • Anyone in your household you have had close contact with (within six feet for approximately 10 minutes) should self-quarantine for 14 days, even if you haven’t been tested for COVID-19.
    • If you have a medical emergency, call 911. If you have severe respiratory symptoms, especially shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, tell the 911 dispatcher about your symptoms. Do not wait for a COVID-19 test to call 911.

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

  •  

    03/20: Testing Resources

    State health department sending testing resources to communities throughout Colorado

    Drive-through testing site will be open in Salida on Saturday 

    DENVER, March 20, 2020: The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) is sending testing resources to specific communities that have not yet had testing that will yield vital information about how the disease is spreading. CDPHE is also strongly advising the public: If you have symptoms (fever, cough, and shortness of breath), don’t wait for a test to self-isolate.

    The State is expanding testing to include a temporary drive-through site at the Chaffee County Fairgrounds at 10165 County Road 120, Salida, CO on Saturday, March 21. The Colorado National Guard and Chaffee County Public Health are supporting these efforts. Chaffee County residents who are symptomatic and have a doctor’s order can show up between noon and 4 p.m. for the test. 

    People who come to be tested should know and do the following: 

    • Testing is free. Proof of insurance is not required. 
    • Bring a written or electronic copy of the doctor’s order. Individuals should not go to their doctor’s office but should call to get an emailed or faxed copy of the order. Bring a form of photo ID (driver’s
    • license, school ID, work badge, etc.) that matches the name on the doctor’s order. 
    • If there are multiple people in one vehicle, each person to be tested must have their own doctor’s order.
    • The first 100 people 
    • in the queue will have access to the drive-up testing; all other vehicles that arrive after that will be encouraged to seek testing from a private provider. Always call ahead and speak with the health
    • care facility in advance before going there for testing or treatment.
    • Individuals will drive through a secured area and will remain in their vehicles throughout the entire testing process. 
    • Be prepared for long wait times. No restrooms will be available.
    • Bring water and other items to be comfortable while waiting. 
    • Telephonic interpretation will be available for speakers of other languages. 

    CDPHE also plans to send testing resources to other locations next week. CDPHE is prioritizing testing in areas that have not been highly tested to better understand where the disease is occurring and respond. These sites will serve high-risk patients who have been pre-selected by area health care providers. They will not accept walk-up or drive-up patients.  

    The state health department is also strongly advising that if you have mild symptoms, stay home and avoid contact with others. Call your health care provider only if your illness becomes more severe, especially if you are experiencing shortness of breath. If you have a medical emergency, call 911 and tell the dispatcher your symptoms. People who are not at high risk of severe illness may not need to be evaluated in person or tested for COVID-19. Not everyone with symptoms will be tested right away. 

    If you have mild symptoms, suspect you were exposed, and are either unable to get tested or waiting on test results:

    • Please stay home and isolate yourself until:
      • You have had no fever for at least 72 hours (without the use of medicine)
      • AND
      • Other symptoms (cough, shortness of breath) have improved
      • AND
      • At least 7 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared.
    • Anyone in your household you have had close contact with (within six feet for approximately 10 minutes) should
    • self-quarantine
    • for 14 days, even if you haven’t been tested for COVID-19.

     

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

  •  

    03/16: Parents and Guardians

    State health department provides recommendations for parents and guardians

    DENVER, March 16, 2020: The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has recommendations for parents and guardians with children at home from school.

    Closing schools is a powerful way to slow the spread of COVID-19 and protect people at higher risk from getting very sick or dying. Though kids are thought to be at lower risk for severe disease from COVID-19, they can easily spread it to others.

    “We are all in this together. Nearly every child could have an  interaction with an older adult or others at risk of getting severe illness from  COVID-19. This is not just about keeping kids safe, which is absolutely important; it’s about keeping the whole community safe by limiting and slowing the spread,” said Dr. Rachel Herlihy, state epidemiologist, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

    When school is closed, kids and adults should practice social distancing. Aim to stay 6 feet away from others as much as possible. Do not take children into any social setting when they are sick. 

    The complete set of recommendations is available on the website.

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting colorado.gov/cdphe/2019-novel-coronavirus.

  •  

    03/15: Colorado Cases

    CDPHE confirms 24 additional new presumptive positive cases in Colorado

    DENVER, March 14, 2020: The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) confirmed 24 new presumptive positive cases in Colorado, based on overnight test results. That brings the total number of presumptive positive cases to date to 101.

    The test results include 20 from the state lab and 4 from private testing facilities that are receiving samples from health care providers. The state can confirm completed test results on approximately 800 people in Colorado since testing started on February 28.

    Because of the large number of new cases, CDPHE is shifting to report aggregate data for new cases, instead of listing details on each specific case. Additionally, the release of these updated numbers of cases will be released once per day, at approximately noon.

    Total new presumptive positive cases: 24

    Age of individuals:
    • 20s – 4
    • 30s – 5
    • 40s – 5
    • 50s – 5
    • 60s – 2
    • 70s – 2
    • 80s – 1
    County of residence:
    • Adams - 3
    • Arapahoe – 3
    • Denver – 5
    • Eagle – 4
    • El Paso – 1
    • Gunnison - 2
    • Jefferson – 2
    • Mesa - 1
    • Pitkin – 1
    • Weld - 1
    • Out of state - 1 (Currently located Denver County)

    Resident/Visitor:
    • Residents: 23
    • Visitors: 1
    Gender:
    • Female: 11
    • Male: 13
    To ensure expedience on reporting presumptive positive cases, the state will provide overall testing statistics as soon as we are able on the website.

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting our website.
  •  

    03/13: Drive-up Testing Site

    Lab to implement changes to drive-up

    CDPHE drive-up COVID-19 testing site in Lowry tested more than 650 Coloradans in 2 days

    *We ask members of the media to help us disseminate this information as soon as possible 

    DENVER, March 12, 2020: The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment's (CDPHE) drive-up COVID-19 testing site in Lowry has collected tests for more than 650 Coloradans since Tuesday, March 11. The results of these test results will give the state much needed epidemiological intelligence that is critical for policy decisions.

    Due to the overwhelming response in the first two days, we will be operating with limited capacity on Friday, March 13. This will ensure the safety of our lab and health care workers and minimize unnecessary wait times. Because Colorado now has capacity for private labs to conduct testing, CDPHE encourages anyone who is symptomatic or who believes they may have been exposed to COVID-19 to call or email your physician first for guidance, obtain a doctor’s order for testing, and request information about private providers where you can get tested. Always call first before reporting to a health care facility for testing.

    Any medical provider with a relationship with Labcorp or Qwest can send out the test, but be sure to contact your provider ahead of time because many providers have centralized sites for collection due to safety precautions.

    CDPHE has determined that traffic patterns, on-site staffing, and lab testing capabilities can handle a maximum of 100-150 vehicles in the drive-up queue. 

    • Testing at the drive-up site will take place from noon-2 p.m. on Friday, March 13.
    • The first 100-150 vehicles in the queue will have access to the drive-up testing; all other vehicles that arrive after that will be encouraged to seek testing from a private provider. Always call ahead and speak with the health care facility in advance before going there for testing or treatment.
    • If you have a medical emergency, call 911- do not report to the testing site, as it is not a diagnostic facility not a care facility. If you have severe respiratory symptoms, especially shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, tell the dispatcher about your symptoms. Do not wait for a COVID-19 test to call 911.
    • If you are ill or suspect that you were exposed, but are not able to be immediately tested, please stay home, self-isolate, and contact your physician. 
    • For the safety of drive-up lab workers, hours of operation will be contingent upon safe weather. We will announce if we need to close the site due to unsafe conditions.
    • Unsafe conditions include any weather that can make personal protection equipment ineffective, such as any precipitation, wind, or colder temperatures. 
    • While waiting for their test results, individuals should stay at home. Those who receive positive test results may be issued isolation orders. Depending on test volume, we aim to contact individuals directly with their results within 72 hours.

    Gov. Polis has deployed the Colorado National Guard to help manage logistics, traffic, and other assistance with capacity for the site.

    Continue to stay up to date by visiting colorado.gov/cdphe/2019-novel-coronavirus.

Misc

  •  

    03/25: Returning to Work

    March 25, 2020         

    4:00 p.m. What Public Health Wants You to Know: 
    “Returning to Work” Pueblo, CO #PuebloCOVID19 

    This is to guide individuals returning to work following recommended quarantine or isolation. 

    If your employer will not allow you to return to work after quarantine or isolation without a test: 

    • Contact your human resources representative. If your human resources representative has questions, they may call 719-583-4369. 

    If you are an employer with concerns allowing an employee to return to work without a test: 

    • Please call 719-583-4369 for further guidance. 

    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment does not have, and cannot provide, individuals with a letter clearing you to go back to work. If you had symptoms consistent with COVID-19, you should isolate yourself for 7 days after symptoms started, and continue isolating yourself until you are fever-free (without the use of fever reducing medications) for 3 days.

    Public health is not requiring people to have a negative test to return to work. If your employer is requiring this, you may want to contact your doctor, or another health care provider, or direct your employer to this website (under FAQ- Public health and employment). 

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is answering questions 8 AM – 5 PM, Monday – Friday, 719-583-4444. 

    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the most vulnerable in Pueblo by: 

    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.  
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly. 
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue. 
    • Stay home when you’re sick. 
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. 
    • Avoid close contact with sick people. 
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched.  

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:  

  •  

    03/25: Senior Shopping Time

    March 25, 2020       

    3:00 p.m. What Public Health Wants You to Know:
    “Seniors Shopping Time” Pueblo, CO #PuebloCOVID19

    Many stores in the area are offering a separate time for senior only shopping to assist in keeping one of the most vulnerable populations protected from the spread of COVID-19. At this time, information for senior only shopping is as follows:

    • Albertson’s
      • Tuesdays and Thursdays, 7 – 9 AM
    • Dollar General, 1245 Spruce
      • Every day, 8 – 9 AM
    • Dollar General, W. 18th Street
      • Sundays, 8 – 9 AM
    • Dollar General, 1502 Troy
      • Every day, 8 –9 AM
    • Dollar General, 609 Pueblo Boulevard
      • Thursdays, 12 – 1 PM; All other days, 8 –9 AM
    • Dollar General, 1610 Santa Fe
      • Every day, 8 – 9 AM
    • Dollar General, 2417 Prairie
      • Every day, 8 –9 AM
    • King Soopers North and South
      • Monday, Wednesday, and Friday: 7 – 9 AM
    • LaGrees
      • Every day, 8 – 10 AM
    • Natural Grocers
      • Sundays,  9 – 10 AM
    • Safeway Southside and Pueblo West
      • Tuesdays and Thursdays, 7 – 9 AM
    • Sam’s Club
      • Thursdays, 7 – 9 AM
    • Save-A-Lot
      • Every day, 7 – 8 AM
    • Target
      • Every day, 8 – 9 AM
    • Walmart; South, North, Pueblo West, Neighborhood Market
      • Every day  6 -7 AM

    All public and media inquiries in Pueblo are answered through the local hotline at Pueblo’s Joint Information Center. Pueblo COVID-19 Hotline is answering questions 8 AM – 5 PM, Monday – Friday, 719-583-4444.   

    Everybody has a responsibility to protect the most vulnerable in Pueblo by:

    • Minimize social activities and being physically close to other people.
    • Do not go to the emergency room unless medically necessary.
    • Wash your hands with soap regularly.
    • Cough or sneeze into elbow or tissue.
    • Stay home when you’re sick.
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    • Avoid close contact with sick people.
    • Clean surfaces frequently touched

    Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment encourages residents to seek out credible, reliable sources of information on COVID-19:

    ###

  •  

    03/19: Food Production and Supply

    Broomfield, Colo. - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are ensuring that food production and supply systems nationwide remain safe and abundant. Currently, there is no evidence to suggest that food produced in the United States can transmit COVID-19, and no evidence to support the transmission of COVID-19 associated with imported goods. Additionally, there are no reported cases of COVID-19 in the United States associated with imported goods.

    “People across Colorado can rest assured that our state’s food supply systems are operating as intended:  To provide plenty of safe food for the public,” said Colorado Commissioner of Agriculture Kate Greenberg. “The Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA) is working closely with the USDA, together ensuring the safety and timely delivery of the U.S. food supply while protecting the health of our employees during the COVID-19 National Emergency.”

    Commissioner Greenberg has created a Food Security Task Force to work closely with Colorado’s agriculture producers and food companies across the supply chain to support their needs during the COVID-19 emergency. For more information about the Task Force, please contact Tom Lipetzky, Director of CDA’s Markets Division, or Jordan Beezley, CDA Legislative and Policy Advisor.

    The public is reminded to consult only trusted scientific sources for accurate information about food safety, supply and COVID-19. Please see the attached food safety fact sheet from the Colorado Department of Agriculture and visit the U.S. Food and Drug Administration  and U.S. Department of Agriculture food safety FAQ pages.

  •  

    03/17: PSAT and SAT

    CDE announces pause on 2019-20 state assessments, accountability

    State working on possible solution for PSAT, SAT

    DENVER – The administration of end-of-the-year assessments, including the Colorado Measures of Academic Success (CMAS), will be paused for the remainder of the 2019-20 school year due to extensive school closures throughout Colorado to prevent the spread of COVID-19, Colorado Education Commissioner Katy Anthes announced today. 

    “With the extraordinary actions we are taking to prevent the spread of COVID-19, it’s clear that we need to press pause on our CMAS tests this year,” Commissioner Anthes said. “Students and educators need to feel a sense of stability and normalcy before state tests can be administered and produce valid results. This also means we plan to pause our school and district state accountability system as it relates to state assessments for a year.” 

    CDE is working with The College Board to generate possible solutions for the administration of the PSAT and SAT tests, which offer unique roles in Colorado’s system in terms of scholarships and college entrance. Additional information will come from CDE as it becomes available.

    CDE intends to engage with the U.S. Department of Education to address implications, including those related to federal accountability, and will complete waiver documentation as necessary, Anthes said.

    "I’m a big fan of accountability and transparency in public education, but we will simply have to forgo incredibly useful data on student achievement for a year to help contain the virus,” said Colorado Gov. Jared Polis. “Right now, students, families, and educators need to be focused on doing everything they can to keep families safe and stable. It is clear that COVID-19 will put extraordinary stress on our education system for the coming weeks and months. In order to ensure our schools and educators are able to spend as much time as possible on online instruction in a difficult situation, I support the decision to pause assessments and school accountability for this year only.”

    Making the decision to pause testing now allows schools and districts to concentrate on determining ways to deliver continued instruction to the extent they are able during this unprecedented disruption in education, Anthes said.

    The department will continue working with schools and districts that are already identified for improvement to help support instruction, including options for instruction during and after school closures. 

    CDE has compiled resources about Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) for schools and districts on its website, http://www.cde.state.co.us/safeschools.
  •  

    03/16: St. Patrick's Day

    St. Patrick’s Day Message from Mayor Nicholas Gradisar

    Pueblo has a long tradition of celebrating St. Patrick’s Day. This year must be different. Due to the COVID-19 Virus Health Emergency, I encourage everyone to celebrate the holiday at home with your family. Because we are in the midst of this infectious outbreak which is spread for the most part by personal contact, it is imperative that we maintain adequate social distancing. Experts suggest that we maintain six feet of distance between ourselves and others. Unfortunately, this social distancing cannot be accomplished by eating inside restaurants and bars.

    Each of us has a role to play in fighting this battle. While restricting inside dining and drinking will be unfortunate for those small businesses, it is absolutely necessary to slow the spread of this infection. Encourage your favorite restaurant to limit their services to take out only or outside dining.

    As of this writing we only have one confirmed case of the virus in Pueblo. While this number will surely increase, to date, there is no evidence that it is being transmitted within the community. Maintaining our social distancing can mitigate the spread of the infection. These are unprecedented times and they require unprecedented measures, as difficult as they may be.

    Pueblo will make it through this crisis, and we will soon be back to planning community activities and celebrations. The precautions that we make today will ensure that we will be celebrating as a community again soon.

Pueblo Communicators Unify to Share Timely Information about Coronavirus

The Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment (PDPHE) continues to respond to developments related to the COVID-19 outbreak, and part of that response is to ensure that accurate, timely information is being shared to the greater Pueblo community.

As a result, PDPHE partnered with multiple local governmental, public safety, health, and educational agencies to create a Unified Message COVID-19 group, whose goal is to share timely, accurate information to the public, with the PDPHE as the lead.

Most developments related to the COVID-19 outbreak will be disseminated by PDPHE via local media and social media, with local agencies playing a supporting role. PDPHE is also in regular contact with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in order to obtain relevant information.

Public Health alerts and any response measures taken related to COVID-19 will be posted for the general public via PDPHE’s Facebook and Twitter channels (@PuebloHealth), with partner organizations sharing those posts. Additionally, press releases and press conferences will be organized and led by PDPHE, with partner agencies playing a supporting role as needed.

The following agencies have partnered with PDPHE:

For media inquiries related to COVID-19, local media is asked to contact Sarah Joseph, PDPHE Public Information Officer, at (719) 583-4526 or via email at sarah.joseph@pueblocounty.us.
Aerial shot of campus fountain

Campus Safety: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

We have a number of individuals working on a plan to ensure that we are prepared to take care of our students and employees in the event our campus is directly impacted by the coronavirus.

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